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PHYLOGENETIC META-ANALYSIS

Meta-analysis is a powerful statistical technique that combines the results of independent studies to identify general trends. When the species under examination are not independent however, it is also necessary to incorporate phylogenetic information into the analysis. Unfortunately, current meta-a... Full description

Journal Title: Evolution 2008-03, Vol.62 (3), p.567-572
Main Author: Adams, Dean C
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: Malden, USA: Blackwell Science Inc
ID: ISSN: 0014-3820
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18182073
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title: PHYLOGENETIC META-ANALYSIS
format: Article
creator:
  • Adams, Dean C
subjects:
  • Animals
  • Biological taxonomies
  • Body Size
  • Cladistic analysis
  • Classification - methods
  • Comparative method
  • Correlations
  • Covariance matrices
  • Ecology
  • Evolution
  • Evolutionary biology
  • general linear models
  • Genetics
  • Mammals
  • Mammals - anatomy & histology
  • Mammals - genetics
  • Meta analysis
  • Meta-Analysis as Topic
  • Models, Theoretical
  • Original s
  • Phylogenetics
  • Phylogeny
  • Population ecology
  • quantitative research synthesis
  • Usage
ispartof: Evolution, 2008-03, Vol.62 (3), p.567-572
description: Meta-analysis is a powerful statistical technique that combines the results of independent studies to identify general trends. When the species under examination are not independent however, it is also necessary to incorporate phylogenetic information into the analysis. Unfortunately, current meta-analytic approaches cannot account for lack of independence resulting from shared evolutionary history, so a general solution to this problem is lacking. In this article, I derive a model for phylogenetic meta-analysis, so that data across studies may be summarized with evolutionary history explicitly incorporated. The approach takes advantage of common aspects of linear statistical models used by both meta-analysis and the phylogenetic comparative method, thereby allowing them to be analytically combined. In this manner, the correlation structure generated by phylogenetic history can be incorporated directly into the meta-analytic procedure. I illustrate the approach by examining the prevalence of body size clines in mammals. The approach is general, and can also be used to incorporate correlation structure among studies generated by other factors, such as spatial or temporal proximity, or environmental similarity. Therefore, this procedure provides a general statistical template for meta-analytic techniques that can account for attributes that generate nonindependence among studies. Implications of the phylogenetic meta-analysis are discussed.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0014-3820
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0014-3820
  • 1558-5646
url: Link


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descriptionMeta-analysis is a powerful statistical technique that combines the results of independent studies to identify general trends. When the species under examination are not independent however, it is also necessary to incorporate phylogenetic information into the analysis. Unfortunately, current meta-analytic approaches cannot account for lack of independence resulting from shared evolutionary history, so a general solution to this problem is lacking. In this article, I derive a model for phylogenetic meta-analysis, so that data across studies may be summarized with evolutionary history explicitly incorporated. The approach takes advantage of common aspects of linear statistical models used by both meta-analysis and the phylogenetic comparative method, thereby allowing them to be analytically combined. In this manner, the correlation structure generated by phylogenetic history can be incorporated directly into the meta-analytic procedure. I illustrate the approach by examining the prevalence of body size clines in mammals. The approach is general, and can also be used to incorporate correlation structure among studies generated by other factors, such as spatial or temporal proximity, or environmental similarity. Therefore, this procedure provides a general statistical template for meta-analytic techniques that can account for attributes that generate nonindependence among studies. Implications of the phylogenetic meta-analysis are discussed.
editionReceived October 15, 2007 Accepted November 28, 2007
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subjectAnimals ; Biological taxonomies ; Body Size ; Cladistic analysis ; Classification - methods ; Comparative method ; Correlations ; Covariance matrices ; Ecology ; Evolution ; Evolutionary biology ; general linear models ; Genetics ; Mammals ; Mammals - anatomy & histology ; Mammals - genetics ; Meta analysis ; Meta-Analysis as Topic ; Models, Theoretical ; Original s ; Phylogenetics ; Phylogeny ; Population ecology ; quantitative research synthesis ; Usage
ispartofEvolution, 2008-03, Vol.62 (3), p.567-572
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abstractMeta-analysis is a powerful statistical technique that combines the results of independent studies to identify general trends. When the species under examination are not independent however, it is also necessary to incorporate phylogenetic information into the analysis. Unfortunately, current meta-analytic approaches cannot account for lack of independence resulting from shared evolutionary history, so a general solution to this problem is lacking. In this article, I derive a model for phylogenetic meta-analysis, so that data across studies may be summarized with evolutionary history explicitly incorporated. The approach takes advantage of common aspects of linear statistical models used by both meta-analysis and the phylogenetic comparative method, thereby allowing them to be analytically combined. In this manner, the correlation structure generated by phylogenetic history can be incorporated directly into the meta-analytic procedure. I illustrate the approach by examining the prevalence of body size clines in mammals. The approach is general, and can also be used to incorporate correlation structure among studies generated by other factors, such as spatial or temporal proximity, or environmental similarity. Therefore, this procedure provides a general statistical template for meta-analytic techniques that can account for attributes that generate nonindependence among studies. Implications of the phylogenetic meta-analysis are discussed.
copMalden, USA
pubBlackwell Science Inc
pmid18182073
doi10.1111/j.1558-5646.2007.00314.x
tpages13
editionReceived October 15, 2007 Accepted November 28, 2007