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GENETICS AND RECENT HUMAN EVOLUTION

Starting with “mitochondrial Eve” in 1987, genetics has played an increasingly important role in studies of the last two million years of human evolution. It initially appeared that genetic data resolved the basic models of recent human evolution in favor of the “out-of-Africa replacement” hypothesi... Full description

Journal Title: Evolution 2007, Vol.61 (7), p.1507-1519
Main Author: Templeton, Alan R
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
DNA
Publisher: Malden, USA: Blackwell Science Inc
ID: ISSN: 0014-3820
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17598736
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recordid: cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_70677305
title: GENETICS AND RECENT HUMAN EVOLUTION
format: Article
creator:
  • Templeton, Alan R
subjects:
  • Biological Evolution
  • DNA
  • Evolution
  • Evolutionary biology
  • Evolutionary genetics
  • Gene flow
  • Genes
  • Genetic research
  • Genetics
  • Genetics, Medical
  • Geography
  • Haplotypes
  • Human evolution
  • Human genetics
  • Humans
  • Hypotheses
  • Mitochondrial DNA
  • mitochondrial Eve
  • Modeling
  • multiregional model
  • nested clade analysis
  • Null hypothesis
  • out-of-Africa replacement
  • Pedigree
  • Perspective
  • Phylogeny
  • phylogeography
  • Population genetics
ispartof: Evolution, 2007, Vol.61 (7), p.1507-1519
description: Starting with “mitochondrial Eve” in 1987, genetics has played an increasingly important role in studies of the last two million years of human evolution. It initially appeared that genetic data resolved the basic models of recent human evolution in favor of the “out-of-Africa replacement” hypothesis in which anatomically modern humans evolved in Africa about 150,000 years ago, started to spread throughout the world about 100,000 years ago, and subsequently drove to complete genetic extinction (replacement) all other human populations in Eurasia. Unfortunately, many of the genetic studies on recent human evolution have suffered from scientific flaws, including misrepresenting the models of recent human evolution, focusing upon hypothesis compatibility rather than hypothesis testing, committing the ecological fallacy, and failing to consider a broader array of alternative hypotheses. Once these flaws are corrected, there is actually little genetic support for the out-of-Africa replacement hypothesis. Indeed, when genetic data are used in a hypothesis-testing framework, the out-of-Africa replacement hypothesis is strongly rejected. The model of recent human evolution that emerges from a statistical hypothesis-testing framework does not correspond to any of the traditional models of human evolution, but it is compatible with fossil and archaeological data. These studies also reveal that any one gene or DNA region captures only a small part of human evolutionary history, so multilocus studies are essential. As more and more loci became available, genetics will undoubtedly offer additional insights and resolutions of human evolution.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0014-3820
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0014-3820
  • 1558-5646
url: Link


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descriptionStarting with “mitochondrial Eve” in 1987, genetics has played an increasingly important role in studies of the last two million years of human evolution. It initially appeared that genetic data resolved the basic models of recent human evolution in favor of the “out-of-Africa replacement” hypothesis in which anatomically modern humans evolved in Africa about 150,000 years ago, started to spread throughout the world about 100,000 years ago, and subsequently drove to complete genetic extinction (replacement) all other human populations in Eurasia. Unfortunately, many of the genetic studies on recent human evolution have suffered from scientific flaws, including misrepresenting the models of recent human evolution, focusing upon hypothesis compatibility rather than hypothesis testing, committing the ecological fallacy, and failing to consider a broader array of alternative hypotheses. Once these flaws are corrected, there is actually little genetic support for the out-of-Africa replacement hypothesis. Indeed, when genetic data are used in a hypothesis-testing framework, the out-of-Africa replacement hypothesis is strongly rejected. The model of recent human evolution that emerges from a statistical hypothesis-testing framework does not correspond to any of the traditional models of human evolution, but it is compatible with fossil and archaeological data. These studies also reveal that any one gene or DNA region captures only a small part of human evolutionary history, so multilocus studies are essential. As more and more loci became available, genetics will undoubtedly offer additional insights and resolutions of human evolution.
editionReceived January 12, 2007Accepted April 19, 2007
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subjectBiological Evolution ; DNA ; Evolution ; Evolutionary biology ; Evolutionary genetics ; Gene flow ; Genes ; Genetic research ; Genetics ; Genetics, Medical ; Geography ; Haplotypes ; Human evolution ; Human genetics ; Humans ; Hypotheses ; Mitochondrial DNA ; mitochondrial Eve ; Modeling ; multiregional model ; nested clade analysis ; Null hypothesis ; out-of-Africa replacement ; Pedigree ; Perspective ; Phylogeny ; phylogeography ; Population genetics
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abstractStarting with “mitochondrial Eve” in 1987, genetics has played an increasingly important role in studies of the last two million years of human evolution. It initially appeared that genetic data resolved the basic models of recent human evolution in favor of the “out-of-Africa replacement” hypothesis in which anatomically modern humans evolved in Africa about 150,000 years ago, started to spread throughout the world about 100,000 years ago, and subsequently drove to complete genetic extinction (replacement) all other human populations in Eurasia. Unfortunately, many of the genetic studies on recent human evolution have suffered from scientific flaws, including misrepresenting the models of recent human evolution, focusing upon hypothesis compatibility rather than hypothesis testing, committing the ecological fallacy, and failing to consider a broader array of alternative hypotheses. Once these flaws are corrected, there is actually little genetic support for the out-of-Africa replacement hypothesis. Indeed, when genetic data are used in a hypothesis-testing framework, the out-of-Africa replacement hypothesis is strongly rejected. The model of recent human evolution that emerges from a statistical hypothesis-testing framework does not correspond to any of the traditional models of human evolution, but it is compatible with fossil and archaeological data. These studies also reveal that any one gene or DNA region captures only a small part of human evolutionary history, so multilocus studies are essential. As more and more loci became available, genetics will undoubtedly offer additional insights and resolutions of human evolution.
copMalden, USA
pubBlackwell Science Inc
pmid17598736
doi10.1111/j.1558-5646.2007.00164.x
tpages13
editionReceived January 12, 2007Accepted April 19, 2007
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