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Methanogen communities along a primary succession transect of mire ecosystems

Abstract Peat accumulating mires are important sources of the greenhouse gas methane. Methane emissions and methanogenic Archaea communities have been shown to differ between fens and bogs, implying that mire succession includes an ecological succession in methanogen communities. We investigated met... Full description

Journal Title: FEMS microbiology ecology 2006-02-01, Vol.55 (2), p.221-229
Main Author: Merilä, Päivi
Other Authors: Galand, Pierre E , Fritze, Hannu , Tuittila, Eeva-Stiina , Kukko-oja, Kari , Laine, Jukka , Yrjälä, Kim
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: Oxford, UK: Blackwell Publishing Ltd
ID: ISSN: 0168-6496
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title: Methanogen communities along a primary succession transect of mire ecosystems
format: Article
creator:
  • Merilä, Päivi
  • Galand, Pierre E
  • Fritze, Hannu
  • Tuittila, Eeva-Stiina
  • Kukko-oja, Kari
  • Laine, Jukka
  • Yrjälä, Kim
subjects:
  • Amplification
  • Archaea
  • Biodiversity
  • Biological and medical sciences
  • Bogs
  • Coenzyme M
  • Communities
  • Community structure
  • DNA Fingerprinting
  • DNA, Archaeal - genetics
  • Ecological monitoring
  • Ecological succession
  • Ecosystem
  • Ecosystems
  • Environmental aspects
  • Euryarchaeota - genetics
  • Euryarchaeota - isolation & purification
  • Euryarchaeota - metabolism
  • Fens
  • Fingerprinting
  • Fragments
  • Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology
  • Gene polymorphism
  • Greenhouse effect
  • Greenhouse gases
  • Incubation
  • Methane
  • Methane - biosynthesis
  • methane production
  • methanogen Archaea
  • Methanogenic archaea
  • methyl‐coenzyme M reductase
  • Microbiology
  • Multidimensional scaling
  • Ordination
  • Oxidoreductases - genetics
  • Peat
  • peatlands
  • Polymorphism
  • Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length
  • Reductase
  • Reductases
  • Research institutes
  • Restriction fragment length polymorphism
  • Soil Microbiology
  • terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism
  • Time Factors
  • Uplift
  • Water table
ispartof: FEMS microbiology ecology, 2006-02-01, Vol.55 (2), p.221-229
description: Abstract Peat accumulating mires are important sources of the greenhouse gas methane. Methane emissions and methanogenic Archaea communities have been shown to differ between fens and bogs, implying that mire succession includes an ecological succession in methanogen communities. We investigated methane production and the methanogen communities along a chronosequence of mires (ca. 100–2500 years), which consisted of five sites (1–5) located on the land-uplift coast of the Gulf of Bothnia. Methane production was measured in a laboratory incubation experiment. Methanogen communities were determined by amplification of a methyl coenzyme M-reductase (mcr) gene marker and analyzed by terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism. The terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism fingerprinting resulted in 15 terminal restriction fragments. The ordination configuration of the terminal restriction fragments data, using nonmetric multidimensional scaling, showed a clear gradient in the methanogen community structure along the mire chronosequence. In addition, fingerprint patterns of samples from the water table level and 40 cm below differed from one another in the bog site (site 5). Methane production was negligible in the three youngest fen sites (sites 1–3) and showed the highest rates in the oligotrophic fen site (site 4). Successful PCR amplification using mcr gene primers revealed the presence of a methanogen community in all five sites along the study transect.
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 0168-6496
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0168-6496
  • 1574-6941
url: Link


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descriptionAbstract Peat accumulating mires are important sources of the greenhouse gas methane. Methane emissions and methanogenic Archaea communities have been shown to differ between fens and bogs, implying that mire succession includes an ecological succession in methanogen communities. We investigated methane production and the methanogen communities along a chronosequence of mires (ca. 100–2500 years), which consisted of five sites (1–5) located on the land-uplift coast of the Gulf of Bothnia. Methane production was measured in a laboratory incubation experiment. Methanogen communities were determined by amplification of a methyl coenzyme M-reductase (mcr) gene marker and analyzed by terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism. The terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism fingerprinting resulted in 15 terminal restriction fragments. The ordination configuration of the terminal restriction fragments data, using nonmetric multidimensional scaling, showed a clear gradient in the methanogen community structure along the mire chronosequence. In addition, fingerprint patterns of samples from the water table level and 40 cm below differed from one another in the bog site (site 5). Methane production was negligible in the three youngest fen sites (sites 1–3) and showed the highest rates in the oligotrophic fen site (site 4). Successful PCR amplification using mcr gene primers revealed the presence of a methanogen community in all five sites along the study transect.
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subjectAmplification ; Archaea ; Biodiversity ; Biological and medical sciences ; Bogs ; Coenzyme M ; Communities ; Community structure ; DNA Fingerprinting ; DNA, Archaeal - genetics ; Ecological monitoring ; Ecological succession ; Ecosystem ; Ecosystems ; Environmental aspects ; Euryarchaeota - genetics ; Euryarchaeota - isolation & purification ; Euryarchaeota - metabolism ; Fens ; Fingerprinting ; Fragments ; Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology ; Gene polymorphism ; Greenhouse effect ; Greenhouse gases ; Incubation ; Methane ; Methane - biosynthesis ; methane production ; methanogen Archaea ; Methanogenic archaea ; methyl‐coenzyme M reductase ; Microbiology ; Multidimensional scaling ; Ordination ; Oxidoreductases - genetics ; Peat ; peatlands ; Polymorphism ; Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length ; Reductase ; Reductases ; Research institutes ; Restriction fragment length polymorphism ; Soil Microbiology ; terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism ; Time Factors ; Uplift ; Water table
ispartofFEMS microbiology ecology, 2006-02-01, Vol.55 (2), p.221-229
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6Yrjälä, Kim
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descriptionAbstract Peat accumulating mires are important sources of the greenhouse gas methane. Methane emissions and methanogenic Archaea communities have been shown to differ between fens and bogs, implying that mire succession includes an ecological succession in methanogen communities. We investigated methane production and the methanogen communities along a chronosequence of mires (ca. 100–2500 years), which consisted of five sites (1–5) located on the land-uplift coast of the Gulf of Bothnia. Methane production was measured in a laboratory incubation experiment. Methanogen communities were determined by amplification of a methyl coenzyme M-reductase (mcr) gene marker and analyzed by terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism. The terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism fingerprinting resulted in 15 terminal restriction fragments. The ordination configuration of the terminal restriction fragments data, using nonmetric multidimensional scaling, showed a clear gradient in the methanogen community structure along the mire chronosequence. In addition, fingerprint patterns of samples from the water table level and 40 cm below differed from one another in the bog site (site 5). Methane production was negligible in the three youngest fen sites (sites 1–3) and showed the highest rates in the oligotrophic fen site (site 4). Successful PCR amplification using mcr gene primers revealed the presence of a methanogen community in all five sites along the study transect.
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2Biodiversity
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4Bogs
5Coenzyme M
6Communities
7Community structure
8DNA Fingerprinting
9DNA, Archaeal - genetics
10Ecological monitoring
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14Environmental aspects
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17Euryarchaeota - metabolism
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19Fingerprinting
20Fragments
21Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology
22Gene polymorphism
23Greenhouse effect
24Greenhouse gases
25Incubation
26Methane
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31methyl‐coenzyme M reductase
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34Ordination
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40Reductase
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42Research institutes
43Restriction fragment length polymorphism
44Soil Microbiology
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0Merilä, Päivi
1Galand, Pierre E
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atitleMethanogen communities along a primary succession transect of mire ecosystems
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issue2
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pages221-229
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eissn1574-6941
notes
0Current address
1Editor: Gary King
2Pierre E. Galand, Département de biologie, Université Laval, Québec, Canada. E‐mail
3pierre.galand.1@ulaval.ca
abstractAbstract Peat accumulating mires are important sources of the greenhouse gas methane. Methane emissions and methanogenic Archaea communities have been shown to differ between fens and bogs, implying that mire succession includes an ecological succession in methanogen communities. We investigated methane production and the methanogen communities along a chronosequence of mires (ca. 100–2500 years), which consisted of five sites (1–5) located on the land-uplift coast of the Gulf of Bothnia. Methane production was measured in a laboratory incubation experiment. Methanogen communities were determined by amplification of a methyl coenzyme M-reductase (mcr) gene marker and analyzed by terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism. The terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism fingerprinting resulted in 15 terminal restriction fragments. The ordination configuration of the terminal restriction fragments data, using nonmetric multidimensional scaling, showed a clear gradient in the methanogen community structure along the mire chronosequence. In addition, fingerprint patterns of samples from the water table level and 40 cm below differed from one another in the bog site (site 5). Methane production was negligible in the three youngest fen sites (sites 1–3) and showed the highest rates in the oligotrophic fen site (site 4). Successful PCR amplification using mcr gene primers revealed the presence of a methanogen community in all five sites along the study transect.
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