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SPATIAL POPULATION GENETIC STRUCTURE IN TRILLIUM GRANDIFLORUM: THE ROLES OF DISPERSAL, MATING, HISTORY, AND SELECTION

The roles of the various potential ecological and evolutionary causes of spatial population genetic structure (SPGS) cannot in general be inferred from the extant structure alone. However, a stage-specific analysis can provide clues as to the causes of SPGS. We conducted a stage-specific SPGS analys... Full description

Journal Title: Evolution 2001, Vol.55 (8), p.1560-1568
Main Author: Kalisz, Susan
Other Authors: Nason, John D. , Hanzawa, Frances M. , Tonsor, Stephen J.
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: Oxford, UK: Blackwell Publishing Ltd
ID: ISSN: 0014-3820
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11580015
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title: SPATIAL POPULATION GENETIC STRUCTURE IN TRILLIUM GRANDIFLORUM: THE ROLES OF DISPERSAL, MATING, HISTORY, AND SELECTION
format: Article
creator:
  • Kalisz, Susan
  • Nason, John D.
  • Hanzawa, Frances M.
  • Tonsor, Stephen J.
subjects:
  • Alleles
  • Analysis
  • Autocorrelation
  • Chromosome mapping
  • Evolution
  • gene flow
  • Genetic aspects
  • Genetic loci
  • Genetic research
  • Genetic structures
  • Genetics
  • Genetics, Population
  • Herbs
  • History
  • Magnoliopsida - genetics
  • Magnoliopsida - physiology
  • Plant reproduction
  • Plants
  • Pollen
  • population genetic structure
  • Population genetics
  • Population parameters
  • Population structure
  • Reproduction
  • Seed dispersal
  • Seeds - physiology
  • selection
  • Selection, Genetic
  • spatial autocorrelation
  • spatial genetic structure
  • stage structure
  • Trillium grandiflorum
ispartof: Evolution, 2001, Vol.55 (8), p.1560-1568
description: The roles of the various potential ecological and evolutionary causes of spatial population genetic structure (SPGS) cannot in general be inferred from the extant structure alone. However, a stage-specific analysis can provide clues as to the causes of SPGS. We conducted a stage-specific SPGS analysis of a mapped population of about 2000 Trillium grandiflorum (Liliaceae), a long-lived perennial herb. We compared SPGS for juvenile (J), nonreproductive (NR), and reproductive (R) stages. Fisher's exact test showed that genotypes had Hardy-Weinberg frequencies at all loci and stage classes. Allele frequencies did not differ between stages. Bootstrapped 99% confidence intervals (99%CI) indicate that F-statistic values are indistinguishable from zero, (except for a slightly negative FITfor the R stage). Spatial autocorrelation was used to calculate f the average kinship coefficient between individuals within distance intervals. Null hypothesis 99%CIs for f were constructed by repeatedly randomizing genotypic locations. Significant positive fine-scale genetic structure was detected in the R and NR stages, but not in the J stage. This structure was most pronounced in the R stage, and declined by about half in each remaining stage: near-neighbor f = 0.122, 0.065, 0.027, for R, NR, and J, respectively. For R and NR, the near-neighbor f lies outside the null hypothesis 99%CI, indicating kinship at approximately the level of half-sibs and first cousins, respectively. We also simulated the expected SPGS of juveniles post dispersal, based on measured R-stage SPGS, the mating system, and measured pollen and seed dispersal properties. This provides a null hypothesis expectation (as a 99%CI) for the J-stage correlogram, against which to test the likelihood that post-dispersal events have influenced J-stage SPGS. The actual J correlogram lies within the null hypothesis 99%CI for the shortest distance interval and nearly all other distance intervals indicating that the observed low recruitment, random mating and seed dispersal patterns are sufficient to account for the disappearance of SPSG between the R and the J stages. The observed increase in SPGS between J and R stages has two potential explanations: history and local selection. The observed low total allelic diversity is consistent with a past bottleneck: a possible historical explanation. Only a longitudinal stage-specific study of SPGS structure can distinguish between historical events and local selection as causes
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0014-3820
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0014-3820
  • 1558-5646
url: Link


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titleSPATIAL POPULATION GENETIC STRUCTURE IN TRILLIUM GRANDIFLORUM: THE ROLES OF DISPERSAL, MATING, HISTORY, AND SELECTION
creatorKalisz, Susan ; Nason, John D. ; Hanzawa, Frances M. ; Tonsor, Stephen J.
creatorcontribKalisz, Susan ; Nason, John D. ; Hanzawa, Frances M. ; Tonsor, Stephen J.
descriptionThe roles of the various potential ecological and evolutionary causes of spatial population genetic structure (SPGS) cannot in general be inferred from the extant structure alone. However, a stage-specific analysis can provide clues as to the causes of SPGS. We conducted a stage-specific SPGS analysis of a mapped population of about 2000 Trillium grandiflorum (Liliaceae), a long-lived perennial herb. We compared SPGS for juvenile (J), nonreproductive (NR), and reproductive (R) stages. Fisher's exact test showed that genotypes had Hardy-Weinberg frequencies at all loci and stage classes. Allele frequencies did not differ between stages. Bootstrapped 99% confidence intervals (99%CI) indicate that F-statistic values are indistinguishable from zero, (except for a slightly negative FITfor the R stage). Spatial autocorrelation was used to calculate f the average kinship coefficient between individuals within distance intervals. Null hypothesis 99%CIs for f were constructed by repeatedly randomizing genotypic locations. Significant positive fine-scale genetic structure was detected in the R and NR stages, but not in the J stage. This structure was most pronounced in the R stage, and declined by about half in each remaining stage: near-neighbor f = 0.122, 0.065, 0.027, for R, NR, and J, respectively. For R and NR, the near-neighbor f lies outside the null hypothesis 99%CI, indicating kinship at approximately the level of half-sibs and first cousins, respectively. We also simulated the expected SPGS of juveniles post dispersal, based on measured R-stage SPGS, the mating system, and measured pollen and seed dispersal properties. This provides a null hypothesis expectation (as a 99%CI) for the J-stage correlogram, against which to test the likelihood that post-dispersal events have influenced J-stage SPGS. The actual J correlogram lies within the null hypothesis 99%CI for the shortest distance interval and nearly all other distance intervals indicating that the observed low recruitment, random mating and seed dispersal patterns are sufficient to account for the disappearance of SPSG between the R and the J stages. The observed increase in SPGS between J and R stages has two potential explanations: history and local selection. The observed low total allelic diversity is consistent with a past bottleneck: a possible historical explanation. Only a longitudinal stage-specific study of SPGS structure can distinguish between historical events and local selection as causes of increased structure with increasing life history stage.
editionReceived June 21, 2000. Accepted April 4, 2001.
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subjectAlleles ; Analysis ; Autocorrelation ; Chromosome mapping ; Evolution ; gene flow ; Genetic aspects ; Genetic loci ; Genetic research ; Genetic structures ; Genetics ; Genetics, Population ; Herbs ; History ; Magnoliopsida - genetics ; Magnoliopsida - physiology ; Plant reproduction ; Plants ; Pollen ; population genetic structure ; Population genetics ; Population parameters ; Population structure ; Reproduction ; Seed dispersal ; Seeds - physiology ; selection ; Selection, Genetic ; spatial autocorrelation ; spatial genetic structure ; stage structure ; Trillium grandiflorum
ispartofEvolution, 2001, Vol.55 (8), p.1560-1568
rightsCopyright 2001 The Society for the Study of Evolution
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descriptionThe roles of the various potential ecological and evolutionary causes of spatial population genetic structure (SPGS) cannot in general be inferred from the extant structure alone. However, a stage-specific analysis can provide clues as to the causes of SPGS. We conducted a stage-specific SPGS analysis of a mapped population of about 2000 Trillium grandiflorum (Liliaceae), a long-lived perennial herb. We compared SPGS for juvenile (J), nonreproductive (NR), and reproductive (R) stages. Fisher's exact test showed that genotypes had Hardy-Weinberg frequencies at all loci and stage classes. Allele frequencies did not differ between stages. Bootstrapped 99% confidence intervals (99%CI) indicate that F-statistic values are indistinguishable from zero, (except for a slightly negative FITfor the R stage). Spatial autocorrelation was used to calculate f the average kinship coefficient between individuals within distance intervals. Null hypothesis 99%CIs for f were constructed by repeatedly randomizing genotypic locations. Significant positive fine-scale genetic structure was detected in the R and NR stages, but not in the J stage. This structure was most pronounced in the R stage, and declined by about half in each remaining stage: near-neighbor f = 0.122, 0.065, 0.027, for R, NR, and J, respectively. For R and NR, the near-neighbor f lies outside the null hypothesis 99%CI, indicating kinship at approximately the level of half-sibs and first cousins, respectively. We also simulated the expected SPGS of juveniles post dispersal, based on measured R-stage SPGS, the mating system, and measured pollen and seed dispersal properties. This provides a null hypothesis expectation (as a 99%CI) for the J-stage correlogram, against which to test the likelihood that post-dispersal events have influenced J-stage SPGS. The actual J correlogram lies within the null hypothesis 99%CI for the shortest distance interval and nearly all other distance intervals indicating that the observed low recruitment, random mating and seed dispersal patterns are sufficient to account for the disappearance of SPSG between the R and the J stages. The observed increase in SPGS between J and R stages has two potential explanations: history and local selection. The observed low total allelic diversity is consistent with a past bottleneck: a possible historical explanation. Only a longitudinal stage-specific study of SPGS structure can distinguish between historical events and local selection as causes of increased structure with increasing life history stage.
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2Autocorrelation
3Chromosome mapping
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5gene flow
6Genetic aspects
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9Genetic structures
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13History
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15Magnoliopsida - physiology
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18Pollen
19population genetic structure
20Population genetics
21Population parameters
22Population structure
23Reproduction
24Seed dispersal
25Seeds - physiology
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titleSPATIAL POPULATION GENETIC STRUCTURE IN TRILLIUM GRANDIFLORUM: THE ROLES OF DISPERSAL, MATING, HISTORY, AND SELECTION
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abstractThe roles of the various potential ecological and evolutionary causes of spatial population genetic structure (SPGS) cannot in general be inferred from the extant structure alone. However, a stage-specific analysis can provide clues as to the causes of SPGS. We conducted a stage-specific SPGS analysis of a mapped population of about 2000 Trillium grandiflorum (Liliaceae), a long-lived perennial herb. We compared SPGS for juvenile (J), nonreproductive (NR), and reproductive (R) stages. Fisher's exact test showed that genotypes had Hardy-Weinberg frequencies at all loci and stage classes. Allele frequencies did not differ between stages. Bootstrapped 99% confidence intervals (99%CI) indicate that F-statistic values are indistinguishable from zero, (except for a slightly negative FITfor the R stage). Spatial autocorrelation was used to calculate f the average kinship coefficient between individuals within distance intervals. Null hypothesis 99%CIs for f were constructed by repeatedly randomizing genotypic locations. Significant positive fine-scale genetic structure was detected in the R and NR stages, but not in the J stage. This structure was most pronounced in the R stage, and declined by about half in each remaining stage: near-neighbor f = 0.122, 0.065, 0.027, for R, NR, and J, respectively. For R and NR, the near-neighbor f lies outside the null hypothesis 99%CI, indicating kinship at approximately the level of half-sibs and first cousins, respectively. We also simulated the expected SPGS of juveniles post dispersal, based on measured R-stage SPGS, the mating system, and measured pollen and seed dispersal properties. This provides a null hypothesis expectation (as a 99%CI) for the J-stage correlogram, against which to test the likelihood that post-dispersal events have influenced J-stage SPGS. The actual J correlogram lies within the null hypothesis 99%CI for the shortest distance interval and nearly all other distance intervals indicating that the observed low recruitment, random mating and seed dispersal patterns are sufficient to account for the disappearance of SPSG between the R and the J stages. The observed increase in SPGS between J and R stages has two potential explanations: history and local selection. The observed low total allelic diversity is consistent with a past bottleneck: a possible historical explanation. Only a longitudinal stage-specific study of SPGS structure can distinguish between historical events and local selection as causes of increased structure with increasing life history stage.
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pubBlackwell Publishing Ltd
pmid11580015
doi10.1111/j.0014-3820.2001.tb00675.x
tpages9
editionReceived June 21, 2000. Accepted April 4, 2001.
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