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Dietary fatty acids, hemostasis, and cardiovascular disease risk

The cause of many myocardial infarctions is occlusive thrombosis, or a blood clot that stops blood flow in a coronary artery. Hemostasis involves a complex system of factors, which normally form and degrade blood clots, that work within a delicate balance. Emerging evidence suggests that some hemost... Full description

Journal Title: Journal of the American Dietetic Association 2004, Vol.104 (3), p.410-419
Main Author: Lefevre, Michael
Other Authors: Kris-Etherton, Penny M , Zhao, Guixiang , Tracy, Russell P
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: New York, NY: Elsevier Inc
ID: ISSN: 0002-8223
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recordid: cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_71696240
title: Dietary fatty acids, hemostasis, and cardiovascular disease risk
format: Article
creator:
  • Lefevre, Michael
  • Kris-Etherton, Penny M
  • Zhao, Guixiang
  • Tracy, Russell P
subjects:
  • Abridged Index Medicus
  • Biological and medical sciences
  • Blood clots
  • Cardiology. Vascular system
  • Coronary Artery Disease - blood
  • Coronary Artery Disease - etiology
  • Coronary heart disease
  • Dietary Fats
  • Dietary supplements
  • Fatty acids
  • Fatty Acids - administration & dosage
  • Heart
  • Heart attacks
  • Hemostasis
  • Humans
  • Medical sciences
  • Oils & fats
  • Pathology
  • Risk Factors
ispartof: Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 2004, Vol.104 (3), p.410-419
description: The cause of many myocardial infarctions is occlusive thrombosis, or a blood clot that stops blood flow in a coronary artery. Hemostasis involves a complex system of factors, which normally form and degrade blood clots, that work within a delicate balance. Emerging evidence suggests that some hemostatic factors, including factor VII, fibrinogen, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, are associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Accumulating evidence suggests a relationship between dietary fatty acids and emerging hemostatic CVD risk factors, although much of this evidence is incomplete or conflicting. Dietary supplementation with marine n-3 fatty acids prolongs bleeding time and may decrease risk for thrombosis. Factor VII coagulant activity modestly decreases with reductions in saturated fatty acid (SFA) intake and thereby may contribute to the beneficial effects of low SFA diets. Large triglyceride-rich particles formed during postprandial lipemia can support the assembly and function of coagulation complexes and seem to play a role in the activation of factor VII, and thus may partially explain increased CVD risk associated with increased postprandial triglyceridemia. As our understanding of the role of dietary fatty acids and hemostasis evolves, it is likely that we will be able to make specific dietary recommendations to further decrease CVD risk. At this juncture, however, increasing marine n-3 fatty acids and decreasing certain SFAs are leading strategies to reduce hemostatic CVD risk factors. An array of dietary strategies that target multiple CVD risk factors could have a greater impact on CVD than a single risk factor intervention strategy.
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 0002-8223
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0002-8223
  • 1878-3570
url: Link


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descriptionThe cause of many myocardial infarctions is occlusive thrombosis, or a blood clot that stops blood flow in a coronary artery. Hemostasis involves a complex system of factors, which normally form and degrade blood clots, that work within a delicate balance. Emerging evidence suggests that some hemostatic factors, including factor VII, fibrinogen, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, are associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Accumulating evidence suggests a relationship between dietary fatty acids and emerging hemostatic CVD risk factors, although much of this evidence is incomplete or conflicting. Dietary supplementation with marine n-3 fatty acids prolongs bleeding time and may decrease risk for thrombosis. Factor VII coagulant activity modestly decreases with reductions in saturated fatty acid (SFA) intake and thereby may contribute to the beneficial effects of low SFA diets. Large triglyceride-rich particles formed during postprandial lipemia can support the assembly and function of coagulation complexes and seem to play a role in the activation of factor VII, and thus may partially explain increased CVD risk associated with increased postprandial triglyceridemia. As our understanding of the role of dietary fatty acids and hemostasis evolves, it is likely that we will be able to make specific dietary recommendations to further decrease CVD risk. At this juncture, however, increasing marine n-3 fatty acids and decreasing certain SFAs are leading strategies to reduce hemostatic CVD risk factors. An array of dietary strategies that target multiple CVD risk factors could have a greater impact on CVD than a single risk factor intervention strategy.
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subjectAbridged Index Medicus ; Biological and medical sciences ; Blood clots ; Cardiology. Vascular system ; Coronary Artery Disease - blood ; Coronary Artery Disease - etiology ; Coronary heart disease ; Dietary Fats ; Dietary supplements ; Fatty acids ; Fatty Acids - administration & dosage ; Heart ; Heart attacks ; Hemostasis ; Humans ; Medical sciences ; Oils & fats ; Pathology ; Risk Factors
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descriptionThe cause of many myocardial infarctions is occlusive thrombosis, or a blood clot that stops blood flow in a coronary artery. Hemostasis involves a complex system of factors, which normally form and degrade blood clots, that work within a delicate balance. Emerging evidence suggests that some hemostatic factors, including factor VII, fibrinogen, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, are associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Accumulating evidence suggests a relationship between dietary fatty acids and emerging hemostatic CVD risk factors, although much of this evidence is incomplete or conflicting. Dietary supplementation with marine n-3 fatty acids prolongs bleeding time and may decrease risk for thrombosis. Factor VII coagulant activity modestly decreases with reductions in saturated fatty acid (SFA) intake and thereby may contribute to the beneficial effects of low SFA diets. Large triglyceride-rich particles formed during postprandial lipemia can support the assembly and function of coagulation complexes and seem to play a role in the activation of factor VII, and thus may partially explain increased CVD risk associated with increased postprandial triglyceridemia. As our understanding of the role of dietary fatty acids and hemostasis evolves, it is likely that we will be able to make specific dietary recommendations to further decrease CVD risk. At this juncture, however, increasing marine n-3 fatty acids and decreasing certain SFAs are leading strategies to reduce hemostatic CVD risk factors. An array of dietary strategies that target multiple CVD risk factors could have a greater impact on CVD than a single risk factor intervention strategy.
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abstractThe cause of many myocardial infarctions is occlusive thrombosis, or a blood clot that stops blood flow in a coronary artery. Hemostasis involves a complex system of factors, which normally form and degrade blood clots, that work within a delicate balance. Emerging evidence suggests that some hemostatic factors, including factor VII, fibrinogen, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, are associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Accumulating evidence suggests a relationship between dietary fatty acids and emerging hemostatic CVD risk factors, although much of this evidence is incomplete or conflicting. Dietary supplementation with marine n-3 fatty acids prolongs bleeding time and may decrease risk for thrombosis. Factor VII coagulant activity modestly decreases with reductions in saturated fatty acid (SFA) intake and thereby may contribute to the beneficial effects of low SFA diets. Large triglyceride-rich particles formed during postprandial lipemia can support the assembly and function of coagulation complexes and seem to play a role in the activation of factor VII, and thus may partially explain increased CVD risk associated with increased postprandial triglyceridemia. As our understanding of the role of dietary fatty acids and hemostasis evolves, it is likely that we will be able to make specific dietary recommendations to further decrease CVD risk. At this juncture, however, increasing marine n-3 fatty acids and decreasing certain SFAs are leading strategies to reduce hemostatic CVD risk factors. An array of dietary strategies that target multiple CVD risk factors could have a greater impact on CVD than a single risk factor intervention strategy.
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