schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

Growth processes in teeth distinguish modern humans from Homo erectus and earlier hominins

A modern human-like sequence of dental development, as a proxy for the pace of life history, is regarded as one of the diagnostic hallmarks of our own genus Homo. Brain size, age at first reproduction, lifespan and other life-history traits correlate tightly with dental development. Here we report d... Full description

Journal Title: Nature (London) 2001-12-06, Vol.414 (6864), p.628-631
Main Author: Dean, Christopher
Other Authors: Leakey, Meave G , Reid, Donald , Schrenk, Friedemann , Schwartz, Gary T , Stringer, Christopher , Walker, Alan
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: London: Nature Publishing
ID: ISSN: 0028-0836
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_72345713
title: Growth processes in teeth distinguish modern humans from Homo erectus and earlier hominins
format: Article
creator:
  • Dean, Christopher
  • Leakey, Meave G
  • Reid, Donald
  • Schrenk, Friedemann
  • Schwartz, Gary T
  • Stringer, Christopher
  • Walker, Alan
subjects:
  • Adult
  • Animals
  • Biological Evolution
  • Dental Enamel - growth & development
  • Dentition
  • Earth sciences
  • Earth, ocean, space
  • Exact sciences and technology
  • Fossils
  • Hominidae - anatomy & histology
  • Hominidae - classification
  • Hominidae - growth & development
  • Homo erectus
  • Humans
  • Paleontology
  • Species Specificity
  • Tooth - growth & development
  • Vertebrate paleontology
ispartof: Nature (London), 2001-12-06, Vol.414 (6864), p.628-631
description: A modern human-like sequence of dental development, as a proxy for the pace of life history, is regarded as one of the diagnostic hallmarks of our own genus Homo. Brain size, age at first reproduction, lifespan and other life-history traits correlate tightly with dental development. Here we report differences in enamel growth that show the earliest fossils attributed to Homo do not resemble modern humans in their development. We used daily incremental markings in enamel to calculate rates of enamel formation in 13 fossil hominins and identified differences in this key determinant of tooth formation time. Neither australopiths nor fossils currently attributed to early Homo shared the slow trajectory of enamel growth typical of modern humans; rather, both resembled modern and fossil African apes. We then reconstructed tooth formation times in australopiths, in the ∼1.5-Myr-old Homo erectus skeleton from Nariokotome, Kenya, and in another Homo erectus specimen, Sangiran S7-37 from Java. These times were shorter than those in modern humans. It therefore seems likely that truly modern dental development emerged relatively late in human evolution.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0028-0836
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0028-0836
  • 1476-4687
url: Link


@attributes
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
RANK2.487679
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourceidgale_proqu
recordidTN_cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_72345713
sourceformatXML
sourcesystemPC
galeidA187934164
sourcerecordidA187934164
originalsourceidFETCH-LOGICAL-1656t-88f157d51aa048ac6b485f779eabee6617d6fac5cbc6a53efb6be4c3c0aded880
addsrcrecordideNqN0l9rFDEQAPBFFHtW8RMoi6AisjXZ_L3H49C2UBS0IviyzGZn7yK7yTXJYvvtjdxpPalU8jCQ_GYmCVMUjyk5ooTpN5xyWWu4U8woV7LiUqu7xYyQWldEM3lQPIjxGyFEUMXvFwc0ByKEmhVfj4P_ntblJniDMWIsrSsTYt7qbEzWrSYb1-XoOwyuXE8juFj2wY_liR99iQFNmmIJrisRwmAxlGs_WmddfFjc62GI-GgXD4vP796eL0-qsw_Hp8vFWUWlkKnSuqdCdYICEK7ByJZr0Ss1R2gRpaSqkz0YYVojQTDsW9kiN8wQ6LDTmhwWL7Z18xsuJoypGW00OAzg0E-xUTXjQlF2K2SCziX5j4o1pZLV4vaKVNNaMUoyfLaFKxiwsa73KYAxG3uRjZozTiXP6OgGlFeHozXeYW_z_uLPhFd7CdkkvEwrmGJsTj993Lev_20X51-W7_f1y602wccYsG82wY4QrhpKmp8T1-wmLsunuy-Y2hG7a7cbsQye7wBEA0MfwBkbrx2nNVOcZlf91dLYBMnmewawww2Nn2y9gzQF_F3w1_kP6pbzSQ
sourcetypeAggregation Database
isCDItrue
recordtypearticle
pqid18127310
display
typearticle
titleGrowth processes in teeth distinguish modern humans from Homo erectus and earlier hominins
creatorDean, Christopher ; Leakey, Meave G ; Reid, Donald ; Schrenk, Friedemann ; Schwartz, Gary T ; Stringer, Christopher ; Walker, Alan
creatorcontribDean, Christopher ; Leakey, Meave G ; Reid, Donald ; Schrenk, Friedemann ; Schwartz, Gary T ; Stringer, Christopher ; Walker, Alan
descriptionA modern human-like sequence of dental development, as a proxy for the pace of life history, is regarded as one of the diagnostic hallmarks of our own genus Homo. Brain size, age at first reproduction, lifespan and other life-history traits correlate tightly with dental development. Here we report differences in enamel growth that show the earliest fossils attributed to Homo do not resemble modern humans in their development. We used daily incremental markings in enamel to calculate rates of enamel formation in 13 fossil hominins and identified differences in this key determinant of tooth formation time. Neither australopiths nor fossils currently attributed to early Homo shared the slow trajectory of enamel growth typical of modern humans; rather, both resembled modern and fossil African apes. We then reconstructed tooth formation times in australopiths, in the ∼1.5-Myr-old Homo erectus skeleton from Nariokotome, Kenya, and in another Homo erectus specimen, Sangiran S7-37 from Java. These times were shorter than those in modern humans. It therefore seems likely that truly modern dental development emerged relatively late in human evolution.
identifier
0ISSN: 0028-0836
1EISSN: 1476-4687
2DOI: 10.1038/414628a
3PMID: 11740557
4CODEN: NATUAS
languageeng
publisherLondon: Nature Publishing
subjectAdult ; Animals ; Biological Evolution ; Dental Enamel - growth & development ; Dentition ; Earth sciences ; Earth, ocean, space ; Exact sciences and technology ; Fossils ; Hominidae - anatomy & histology ; Hominidae - classification ; Hominidae - growth & development ; Homo erectus ; Humans ; Paleontology ; Species Specificity ; Tooth - growth & development ; Vertebrate paleontology
ispartofNature (London), 2001-12-06, Vol.414 (6864), p.628-631
rights
02002 INIST-CNRS
1COPYRIGHT 2001 Nature Publishing Group
lds50peer_reviewed
citedbyFETCH-LOGICAL-1656t-88f157d51aa048ac6b485f779eabee6617d6fac5cbc6a53efb6be4c3c0aded880
citesFETCH-LOGICAL-1656t-88f157d51aa048ac6b485f779eabee6617d6fac5cbc6a53efb6be4c3c0aded880
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
thumbnail$$Usyndetics_thumb_exl
backlink
0$$Uhttp://pascal-francis.inist.fr/vibad/index.php?action=getRecordDetail&idt=14123741$$DView record in Pascal Francis
1$$Uhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11740557$$D View this record in MEDLINE/PubMed
search
creatorcontrib
0Dean, Christopher
1Leakey, Meave G
2Reid, Donald
3Schrenk, Friedemann
4Schwartz, Gary T
5Stringer, Christopher
6Walker, Alan
title
0Growth processes in teeth distinguish modern humans from Homo erectus and earlier hominins
1Nature (London)
addtitleNature
descriptionA modern human-like sequence of dental development, as a proxy for the pace of life history, is regarded as one of the diagnostic hallmarks of our own genus Homo. Brain size, age at first reproduction, lifespan and other life-history traits correlate tightly with dental development. Here we report differences in enamel growth that show the earliest fossils attributed to Homo do not resemble modern humans in their development. We used daily incremental markings in enamel to calculate rates of enamel formation in 13 fossil hominins and identified differences in this key determinant of tooth formation time. Neither australopiths nor fossils currently attributed to early Homo shared the slow trajectory of enamel growth typical of modern humans; rather, both resembled modern and fossil African apes. We then reconstructed tooth formation times in australopiths, in the ∼1.5-Myr-old Homo erectus skeleton from Nariokotome, Kenya, and in another Homo erectus specimen, Sangiran S7-37 from Java. These times were shorter than those in modern humans. It therefore seems likely that truly modern dental development emerged relatively late in human evolution.
subject
0Adult
1Animals
2Biological Evolution
3Dental Enamel - growth & development
4Dentition
5Earth sciences
6Earth, ocean, space
7Exact sciences and technology
8Fossils
9Hominidae - anatomy & histology
10Hominidae - classification
11Hominidae - growth & development
12Homo erectus
13Humans
14Paleontology
15Species Specificity
16Tooth - growth & development
17Vertebrate paleontology
issn
00028-0836
11476-4687
fulltextfalse
rsrctypearticle
creationdate2001
recordtypearticle
recordideNqN0l9rFDEQAPBFFHtW8RMoi6AisjXZ_L3H49C2UBS0IviyzGZn7yK7yTXJYvvtjdxpPalU8jCQ_GYmCVMUjyk5ooTpN5xyWWu4U8woV7LiUqu7xYyQWldEM3lQPIjxGyFEUMXvFwc0ByKEmhVfj4P_ntblJniDMWIsrSsTYt7qbEzWrSYb1-XoOwyuXE8juFj2wY_liR99iQFNmmIJrisRwmAxlGs_WmddfFjc62GI-GgXD4vP796eL0-qsw_Hp8vFWUWlkKnSuqdCdYICEK7ByJZr0Ss1R2gRpaSqkz0YYVojQTDsW9kiN8wQ6LDTmhwWL7Z18xsuJoypGW00OAzg0E-xUTXjQlF2K2SCziX5j4o1pZLV4vaKVNNaMUoyfLaFKxiwsa73KYAxG3uRjZozTiXP6OgGlFeHozXeYW_z_uLPhFd7CdkkvEwrmGJsTj993Lev_20X51-W7_f1y602wccYsG82wY4QrhpKmp8T1-wmLsunuy-Y2hG7a7cbsQye7wBEA0MfwBkbrx2nNVOcZlf91dLYBMnmewawww2Nn2y9gzQF_F3w1_kP6pbzSQ
startdate20011206
enddate20011206
creator
0Dean, Christopher
1Leakey, Meave G
2Reid, Donald
3Schrenk, Friedemann
4Schwartz, Gary T
5Stringer, Christopher
6Walker, Alan
general
0Nature Publishing
1Nature Publishing Group
scope
0IQODW
1CGR
2CUY
3CVF
4ECM
5EIF
6NPM
7AAYXX
8CITATION
97QP
107SC
117SP
127SR
137TB
147U5
158BQ
168FD
17F28
18FR3
19JG9
20JQ2
21KR7
22L7M
23L~C
24L~D
257X8
sort
creationdate20011206
titleGrowth processes in teeth distinguish modern humans from Homo erectus and earlier hominins
authorDean, Christopher ; Leakey, Meave G ; Reid, Donald ; Schrenk, Friedemann ; Schwartz, Gary T ; Stringer, Christopher ; Walker, Alan
facets
frbrtype5
frbrgroupidcdi_FETCH-LOGICAL-1656t-88f157d51aa048ac6b485f779eabee6617d6fac5cbc6a53efb6be4c3c0aded880
rsrctypearticles
prefilterarticles
languageeng
creationdate2001
topic
0Adult
1Animals
2Biological Evolution
3Dental Enamel - growth & development
4Dentition
5Earth sciences
6Earth, ocean, space
7Exact sciences and technology
8Fossils
9Hominidae - anatomy & histology
10Hominidae - classification
11Hominidae - growth & development
12Homo erectus
13Humans
14Paleontology
15Species Specificity
16Tooth - growth & development
17Vertebrate paleontology
toplevelpeer_reviewed
creatorcontrib
0Dean, Christopher
1Leakey, Meave G
2Reid, Donald
3Schrenk, Friedemann
4Schwartz, Gary T
5Stringer, Christopher
6Walker, Alan
collection
0Pascal-Francis
1Medline
2MEDLINE
3MEDLINE (Ovid)
4MEDLINE
5MEDLINE
6PubMed
7CrossRef
8Calcium & Calcified Tissue Abstracts
9Computer and Information Systems Abstracts
10Electronics & Communications Abstracts
11Engineered Materials Abstracts
12Mechanical & Transportation Engineering Abstracts
13Solid State and Superconductivity Abstracts
14METADEX
15Technology Research Database
16ANTE: Abstracts in New Technology & Engineering
17Engineering Research Database
18Materials Research Database
19ProQuest Computer Science Collection
20Civil Engineering Abstracts
21Advanced Technologies Database with Aerospace
22Computer and Information Systems Abstracts – Academic
23Computer and Information Systems Abstracts Professional
24MEDLINE - Academic
jtitleNature (London)
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextno_fulltext
addata
au
0Dean, Christopher
1Leakey, Meave G
2Reid, Donald
3Schrenk, Friedemann
4Schwartz, Gary T
5Stringer, Christopher
6Walker, Alan
formatjournal
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
atitleGrowth processes in teeth distinguish modern humans from Homo erectus and earlier hominins
jtitleNature (London)
addtitleNature
date2001-12-06
risdate2001
volume414
issue6864
spage628
epage631
pages628-631
issn0028-0836
eissn1476-4687
codenNATUAS
abstractA modern human-like sequence of dental development, as a proxy for the pace of life history, is regarded as one of the diagnostic hallmarks of our own genus Homo. Brain size, age at first reproduction, lifespan and other life-history traits correlate tightly with dental development. Here we report differences in enamel growth that show the earliest fossils attributed to Homo do not resemble modern humans in their development. We used daily incremental markings in enamel to calculate rates of enamel formation in 13 fossil hominins and identified differences in this key determinant of tooth formation time. Neither australopiths nor fossils currently attributed to early Homo shared the slow trajectory of enamel growth typical of modern humans; rather, both resembled modern and fossil African apes. We then reconstructed tooth formation times in australopiths, in the ∼1.5-Myr-old Homo erectus skeleton from Nariokotome, Kenya, and in another Homo erectus specimen, Sangiran S7-37 from Java. These times were shorter than those in modern humans. It therefore seems likely that truly modern dental development emerged relatively late in human evolution.
copLondon
pubNature Publishing
pmid11740557
doi10.1038/414628a
tpages4