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Mortality associated with HIV infection in rural Rakai District, Uganda

To assess mortality impact of HIV in rural Uganda. An open cohort of 19983 adults aged 15-59 years, in Rakai district was followed at 10 month intervals for four surveys. Sociodemographic characteristics and symptomatology/disease conditions were assessed by interview. Deaths among residents and out... Full description

Journal Title: AIDS (London) 2000, Vol.14 (15), p.2391-2400
Main Author: SEWANKAMBO, Nelson K
Other Authors: GRAY, Ronald H , MEEHAN, Mary P , BRAHMBATT, Heena , WAWER, Maria J , AHMAD, Saifuddin , SERWADDA, David , WABWIRE-MANGEN, Fred , NALUGODA, Fred , KIWANUKA, Noah , LUTALO, Tom , KIGOZI, Godfrey , CHUANJUN LI
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: Hagerstown, MD: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
ID: ISSN: 0269-9370
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recordid: cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_72425048
title: Mortality associated with HIV infection in rural Rakai District, Uganda
format: Article
creator:
  • SEWANKAMBO, Nelson K
  • GRAY, Ronald H
  • MEEHAN, Mary P
  • BRAHMBATT, Heena
  • WAWER, Maria J
  • AHMAD, Saifuddin
  • SERWADDA, David
  • WABWIRE-MANGEN, Fred
  • NALUGODA, Fred
  • KIWANUKA, Noah
  • LUTALO, Tom
  • KIGOZI, Godfrey
  • CHUANJUN LI
subjects:
  • Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome
  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Age Factors
  • AIDS/HIV
  • Biological and medical sciences
  • Educational Status
  • Female
  • HIV Infections - mortality
  • Human viral diseases
  • Humans
  • Infant Mortality
  • Infant, Newborn
  • Infant, Newborn, Diseases - mortality
  • Infectious diseases
  • Male
  • Maternal Mortality
  • Medical sciences
  • Middle Aged
  • Mortality Rates
  • population studies
  • Rural Population
  • Sex Factors
  • Socioeconomic Factors
  • Tropical medicine
  • Uganda
  • Uganda - epidemiology
  • Uganda, Rakai Dist
  • Viral diseases
  • Viral diseases of the lymphoid tissue and the blood. Aids
ispartof: AIDS (London), 2000, Vol.14 (15), p.2391-2400
description: To assess mortality impact of HIV in rural Uganda. An open cohort of 19983 adults aged 15-59 years, in Rakai district was followed at 10 month intervals for four surveys. Sociodemographic characteristics and symptomatology/disease conditions were assessed by interview. Deaths among residents and out-migrants were identified household census. Mortality rates were computed per 1000 person years (py) and the rate ratio (RR) of death in HIV-positive/HIV-negative subjects, and the population attributable fraction (PAF) of death were estimated according to sociodemographic characteristics. Mortality associated with potential AIDS defining symptoms and signs was assessed. HIV prevalence was 16.1%. Mortality was 132.6 per 1000 py in HIV-infected versus 6.7 per 1000 py in uninfected subjects, and 73.5% of adult deaths were attributable to HIV infection. Mortality increased with age, but the highest attributable risk of HIV associated deaths were observed in persons aged 20-39 years (PAF > 80%) and in women. HIV associated mortality was highest in the better educated (PAF > or = 75%) and among government employees (PAF > or = 82%). Of the HIV-positive subjects 40.5% reported no illness < 10 months preceding death, symptoms were poor predictors of death (sensitivity 1.6-38.8%), and only 9.1% met the World Health Organization clinical definition of AIDS. Infant mortality rates in babies of HIV-infected and uninfected mothers were 209.4 and 97.7 per 1000, respectively. HIV is taking substantial toll in this population, particularly among the younger better educated adults, and infants. Symptomatology or the World Health Organization definition of AIDS are poor predictors of death.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0269-9370
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0269-9370
  • 1473-5571
url: Link


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titleMortality associated with HIV infection in rural Rakai District, Uganda
creatorSEWANKAMBO, Nelson K ; GRAY, Ronald H ; MEEHAN, Mary P ; BRAHMBATT, Heena ; WAWER, Maria J ; AHMAD, Saifuddin ; SERWADDA, David ; WABWIRE-MANGEN, Fred ; NALUGODA, Fred ; KIWANUKA, Noah ; LUTALO, Tom ; KIGOZI, Godfrey ; CHUANJUN LI
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descriptionTo assess mortality impact of HIV in rural Uganda. An open cohort of 19983 adults aged 15-59 years, in Rakai district was followed at 10 month intervals for four surveys. Sociodemographic characteristics and symptomatology/disease conditions were assessed by interview. Deaths among residents and out-migrants were identified household census. Mortality rates were computed per 1000 person years (py) and the rate ratio (RR) of death in HIV-positive/HIV-negative subjects, and the population attributable fraction (PAF) of death were estimated according to sociodemographic characteristics. Mortality associated with potential AIDS defining symptoms and signs was assessed. HIV prevalence was 16.1%. Mortality was 132.6 per 1000 py in HIV-infected versus 6.7 per 1000 py in uninfected subjects, and 73.5% of adult deaths were attributable to HIV infection. Mortality increased with age, but the highest attributable risk of HIV associated deaths were observed in persons aged 20-39 years (PAF > 80%) and in women. HIV associated mortality was highest in the better educated (PAF > or = 75%) and among government employees (PAF > or = 82%). Of the HIV-positive subjects 40.5% reported no illness < 10 months preceding death, symptoms were poor predictors of death (sensitivity 1.6-38.8%), and only 9.1% met the World Health Organization clinical definition of AIDS. Infant mortality rates in babies of HIV-infected and uninfected mothers were 209.4 and 97.7 per 1000, respectively. HIV is taking substantial toll in this population, particularly among the younger better educated adults, and infants. Symptomatology or the World Health Organization definition of AIDS are poor predictors of death.
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subjectAcquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome ; Adolescent ; Adult ; Age Factors ; AIDS/HIV ; Biological and medical sciences ; Educational Status ; Female ; HIV Infections - mortality ; Human viral diseases ; Humans ; Infant Mortality ; Infant, Newborn ; Infant, Newborn, Diseases - mortality ; Infectious diseases ; Male ; Maternal Mortality ; Medical sciences ; Middle Aged ; Mortality Rates ; population studies ; Rural Population ; Sex Factors ; Socioeconomic Factors ; Tropical medicine ; Uganda ; Uganda - epidemiology ; Uganda, Rakai Dist ; Viral diseases ; Viral diseases of the lymphoid tissue and the blood. Aids
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descriptionTo assess mortality impact of HIV in rural Uganda. An open cohort of 19983 adults aged 15-59 years, in Rakai district was followed at 10 month intervals for four surveys. Sociodemographic characteristics and symptomatology/disease conditions were assessed by interview. Deaths among residents and out-migrants were identified household census. Mortality rates were computed per 1000 person years (py) and the rate ratio (RR) of death in HIV-positive/HIV-negative subjects, and the population attributable fraction (PAF) of death were estimated according to sociodemographic characteristics. Mortality associated with potential AIDS defining symptoms and signs was assessed. HIV prevalence was 16.1%. Mortality was 132.6 per 1000 py in HIV-infected versus 6.7 per 1000 py in uninfected subjects, and 73.5% of adult deaths were attributable to HIV infection. Mortality increased with age, but the highest attributable risk of HIV associated deaths were observed in persons aged 20-39 years (PAF > 80%) and in women. HIV associated mortality was highest in the better educated (PAF > or = 75%) and among government employees (PAF > or = 82%). Of the HIV-positive subjects 40.5% reported no illness < 10 months preceding death, symptoms were poor predictors of death (sensitivity 1.6-38.8%), and only 9.1% met the World Health Organization clinical definition of AIDS. Infant mortality rates in babies of HIV-infected and uninfected mothers were 209.4 and 97.7 per 1000, respectively. HIV is taking substantial toll in this population, particularly among the younger better educated adults, and infants. Symptomatology or the World Health Organization definition of AIDS are poor predictors of death.
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0Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome
1Adolescent
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3Age Factors
4AIDS/HIV
5Biological and medical sciences
6Educational Status
7Female
8HIV Infections - mortality
9Human viral diseases
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12Infant, Newborn
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19Mortality Rates
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21Rural Population
22Sex Factors
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24Tropical medicine
25Uganda
26Uganda - epidemiology
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29Viral diseases of the lymphoid tissue and the blood. Aids
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titleMortality associated with HIV infection in rural Rakai District, Uganda
authorSEWANKAMBO, Nelson K ; GRAY, Ronald H ; MEEHAN, Mary P ; BRAHMBATT, Heena ; WAWER, Maria J ; AHMAD, Saifuddin ; SERWADDA, David ; WABWIRE-MANGEN, Fred ; NALUGODA, Fred ; KIWANUKA, Noah ; LUTALO, Tom ; KIGOZI, Godfrey ; CHUANJUN LI
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1Adolescent
2Adult
3Age Factors
4AIDS/HIV
5Biological and medical sciences
6Educational Status
7Female
8HIV Infections - mortality
9Human viral diseases
10Humans
11Infant Mortality
12Infant, Newborn
13Infant, Newborn, Diseases - mortality
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15Male
16Maternal Mortality
17Medical sciences
18Middle Aged
19Mortality Rates
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21Rural Population
22Sex Factors
23Socioeconomic Factors
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abstractTo assess mortality impact of HIV in rural Uganda. An open cohort of 19983 adults aged 15-59 years, in Rakai district was followed at 10 month intervals for four surveys. Sociodemographic characteristics and symptomatology/disease conditions were assessed by interview. Deaths among residents and out-migrants were identified household census. Mortality rates were computed per 1000 person years (py) and the rate ratio (RR) of death in HIV-positive/HIV-negative subjects, and the population attributable fraction (PAF) of death were estimated according to sociodemographic characteristics. Mortality associated with potential AIDS defining symptoms and signs was assessed. HIV prevalence was 16.1%. Mortality was 132.6 per 1000 py in HIV-infected versus 6.7 per 1000 py in uninfected subjects, and 73.5% of adult deaths were attributable to HIV infection. Mortality increased with age, but the highest attributable risk of HIV associated deaths were observed in persons aged 20-39 years (PAF > 80%) and in women. HIV associated mortality was highest in the better educated (PAF > or = 75%) and among government employees (PAF > or = 82%). Of the HIV-positive subjects 40.5% reported no illness < 10 months preceding death, symptoms were poor predictors of death (sensitivity 1.6-38.8%), and only 9.1% met the World Health Organization clinical definition of AIDS. Infant mortality rates in babies of HIV-infected and uninfected mothers were 209.4 and 97.7 per 1000, respectively. HIV is taking substantial toll in this population, particularly among the younger better educated adults, and infants. Symptomatology or the World Health Organization definition of AIDS are poor predictors of death.
copHagerstown, MD
pubLippincott Williams & Wilkins
pmid11089628
doi10.1097/00002030-200010200-00021