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CULTURAL AND GENETIC EVOLUTION IN MOUNTAIN WHITE-CROWNED SPARROWS: SONG DIALECTS ARE ASSOCIATED WITH POPULATION STRUCTURE

Bird song often varies geographically within a species; when this geographic variation has distinct boundaries, the shared song types are referred to as song dialects. How dialects are produced and their adaptive significance are longstanding problems in biology, with implications for the role of cu... Full description

Journal Title: Evolution 2001, Vol.55 (12), p.2568-2575
Main Author: MacDougall-Shackleton, Elizabeth A.
Other Authors: MacDougall-Shackleton, Scott A.
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: Oxford, UK: Blackwell Publishing Ltd
ID: ISSN: 0014-3820
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11831670
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recordid: cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_72426853
title: CULTURAL AND GENETIC EVOLUTION IN MOUNTAIN WHITE-CROWNED SPARROWS: SONG DIALECTS ARE ASSOCIATED WITH POPULATION STRUCTURE
format: Article
creator:
  • MacDougall-Shackleton, Elizabeth A.
  • MacDougall-Shackleton, Scott A.
subjects:
  • Analysis
  • Animal communication
  • Animals
  • Biological Evolution
  • Bird songs
  • Birds
  • Cluster Analysis
  • Cultural transmission
  • Culture
  • Demographic aspects
  • Evolution
  • Evolutionary genetics
  • Gene flow
  • Genetic aspects
  • Genetic research
  • Genetic variation
  • Genetics
  • Geographic regions
  • Geography
  • Language
  • Phylogeny
  • Population
  • Population biology
  • population genetic structure
  • Population genetics
  • Population structure
  • Regional dialects
  • song dialects
  • Songbirds - classification
  • Songbirds - genetics
  • Songbirds - physiology
  • Sparrows
  • Vocalization, Animal
  • Zonotrichia leucophrys
  • Zonotrichia leucophrys oriantha
ispartof: Evolution, 2001, Vol.55 (12), p.2568-2575
description: Bird song often varies geographically within a species; when this geographic variation has distinct boundaries, the shared song types are referred to as song dialects. How dialects are produced and their adaptive significance are longstanding problems in biology, with implications for the role of culture in the evolution and ecology of diverse organisms, including humans. Here we test the hypothesis that song dialect, a culturally transmitted trait, is related to the population genetic structure of mountain white-crowned sparrows (Zonotrichia leucophrys oriantha). To address this, we compared microsatellite allele frequencies from 18 sample sites representing eight dialect regions in the Sierra Nevada. Pairwise genetic distances were not significantly correlated with geographic distances either within or between dialects, nor did dialect groups form distinct genetic groups according to neighbor-joining or UPGMA analysis, and most variation in allele frequencies occurred among individuals rather than at higher levels. However, most of the remaining variation was attributable to differences among, rather than within, dialect regions, and this among-dialect component of variance was statistically significant. Moreover, when controlling for the effect of geographic distance, song dissimilarity and genetic distance between site pairs were significantly correlated. Thus, song dialects appear to be associated with reductions in, but not strict barriers to, gene flow among dialect regions.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0014-3820
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0014-3820
  • 1558-5646
url: Link


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titleCULTURAL AND GENETIC EVOLUTION IN MOUNTAIN WHITE-CROWNED SPARROWS: SONG DIALECTS ARE ASSOCIATED WITH POPULATION STRUCTURE
creatorMacDougall-Shackleton, Elizabeth A. ; MacDougall-Shackleton, Scott A.
creatorcontribMacDougall-Shackleton, Elizabeth A. ; MacDougall-Shackleton, Scott A.
descriptionBird song often varies geographically within a species; when this geographic variation has distinct boundaries, the shared song types are referred to as song dialects. How dialects are produced and their adaptive significance are longstanding problems in biology, with implications for the role of culture in the evolution and ecology of diverse organisms, including humans. Here we test the hypothesis that song dialect, a culturally transmitted trait, is related to the population genetic structure of mountain white-crowned sparrows (Zonotrichia leucophrys oriantha). To address this, we compared microsatellite allele frequencies from 18 sample sites representing eight dialect regions in the Sierra Nevada. Pairwise genetic distances were not significantly correlated with geographic distances either within or between dialects, nor did dialect groups form distinct genetic groups according to neighbor-joining or UPGMA analysis, and most variation in allele frequencies occurred among individuals rather than at higher levels. However, most of the remaining variation was attributable to differences among, rather than within, dialect regions, and this among-dialect component of variance was statistically significant. Moreover, when controlling for the effect of geographic distance, song dissimilarity and genetic distance between site pairs were significantly correlated. Thus, song dialects appear to be associated with reductions in, but not strict barriers to, gene flow among dialect regions.
editionReceived April 30, 2001. Accepted August 29, 2001.
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subjectAnalysis ; Animal communication ; Animals ; Biological Evolution ; Bird songs ; Birds ; Cluster Analysis ; Cultural transmission ; Culture ; Demographic aspects ; Evolution ; Evolutionary genetics ; Gene flow ; Genetic aspects ; Genetic research ; Genetic variation ; Genetics ; Geographic regions ; Geography ; Language ; Phylogeny ; Population ; Population biology ; population genetic structure ; Population genetics ; Population structure ; Regional dialects ; song dialects ; Songbirds - classification ; Songbirds - genetics ; Songbirds - physiology ; Sparrows ; Vocalization, Animal ; Zonotrichia leucophrys ; Zonotrichia leucophrys oriantha
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descriptionBird song often varies geographically within a species; when this geographic variation has distinct boundaries, the shared song types are referred to as song dialects. How dialects are produced and their adaptive significance are longstanding problems in biology, with implications for the role of culture in the evolution and ecology of diverse organisms, including humans. Here we test the hypothesis that song dialect, a culturally transmitted trait, is related to the population genetic structure of mountain white-crowned sparrows (Zonotrichia leucophrys oriantha). To address this, we compared microsatellite allele frequencies from 18 sample sites representing eight dialect regions in the Sierra Nevada. Pairwise genetic distances were not significantly correlated with geographic distances either within or between dialects, nor did dialect groups form distinct genetic groups according to neighbor-joining or UPGMA analysis, and most variation in allele frequencies occurred among individuals rather than at higher levels. However, most of the remaining variation was attributable to differences among, rather than within, dialect regions, and this among-dialect component of variance was statistically significant. Moreover, when controlling for the effect of geographic distance, song dissimilarity and genetic distance between site pairs were significantly correlated. Thus, song dialects appear to be associated with reductions in, but not strict barriers to, gene flow among dialect regions.
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0Analysis
1Animal communication
2Animals
3Biological Evolution
4Bird songs
5Birds
6Cluster Analysis
7Cultural transmission
8Culture
9Demographic aspects
10Evolution
11Evolutionary genetics
12Gene flow
13Genetic aspects
14Genetic research
15Genetic variation
16Genetics
17Geographic regions
18Geography
19Language
20Phylogeny
21Population
22Population biology
23population genetic structure
24Population genetics
25Population structure
26Regional dialects
27song dialects
28Songbirds - classification
29Songbirds - genetics
30Songbirds - physiology
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32Vocalization, Animal
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titleCULTURAL AND GENETIC EVOLUTION IN MOUNTAIN WHITE-CROWNED SPARROWS: SONG DIALECTS ARE ASSOCIATED WITH POPULATION STRUCTURE
authorMacDougall-Shackleton, Elizabeth A. ; MacDougall-Shackleton, Scott A.
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0Analysis
1Animal communication
2Animals
3Biological Evolution
4Bird songs
5Birds
6Cluster Analysis
7Cultural transmission
8Culture
9Demographic aspects
10Evolution
11Evolutionary genetics
12Gene flow
13Genetic aspects
14Genetic research
15Genetic variation
16Genetics
17Geographic regions
18Geography
19Language
20Phylogeny
21Population
22Population biology
23population genetic structure
24Population genetics
25Population structure
26Regional dialects
27song dialects
28Songbirds - classification
29Songbirds - genetics
30Songbirds - physiology
31Sparrows
32Vocalization, Animal
33Zonotrichia leucophrys
34Zonotrichia leucophrys oriantha
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11Calcium & Calcified Tissue Abstracts
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3Department of Psychology, University of Toronto at Mississauga, Mississauga, Ontario L5L 1C6, Canada; E‐mail: smacdoug@credit.erin.utoronto.ca.
4earns@sympatico.ca
5.
6Department of Zoology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B7, Canada; E‐mail
abstractBird song often varies geographically within a species; when this geographic variation has distinct boundaries, the shared song types are referred to as song dialects. How dialects are produced and their adaptive significance are longstanding problems in biology, with implications for the role of culture in the evolution and ecology of diverse organisms, including humans. Here we test the hypothesis that song dialect, a culturally transmitted trait, is related to the population genetic structure of mountain white-crowned sparrows (Zonotrichia leucophrys oriantha). To address this, we compared microsatellite allele frequencies from 18 sample sites representing eight dialect regions in the Sierra Nevada. Pairwise genetic distances were not significantly correlated with geographic distances either within or between dialects, nor did dialect groups form distinct genetic groups according to neighbor-joining or UPGMA analysis, and most variation in allele frequencies occurred among individuals rather than at higher levels. However, most of the remaining variation was attributable to differences among, rather than within, dialect regions, and this among-dialect component of variance was statistically significant. Moreover, when controlling for the effect of geographic distance, song dissimilarity and genetic distance between site pairs were significantly correlated. Thus, song dialects appear to be associated with reductions in, but not strict barriers to, gene flow among dialect regions.
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pmid11831670
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tpages8
editionReceived April 30, 2001. Accepted August 29, 2001.
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