schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

Serum Antioxidant Vitamins and Blood Pressure in the United States Population

ABSTRACT—Serum vitamin C has been inversely associated with blood pressure in several epidemiologic studies, but little is known about effect of other antioxidant vitamins. We examined the relation between serum vitamins A, C, and E, α-carotene, and β-carotene levels and blood pressure among 15 317... Full description

Journal Title: Hypertension 2002, Vol.40 (6), p.810-816
Main Author: Chen, Jing
Other Authors: He, Jiang , Hamm, Lee , Batuman, Vecihi , Whelton, Paul K
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: Philadelphia, PA: Am Heart Assoc
ID: ISSN: 0194-911X
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_72745357
title: Serum Antioxidant Vitamins and Blood Pressure in the United States Population
format: Article
creator:
  • Chen, Jing
  • He, Jiang
  • Hamm, Lee
  • Batuman, Vecihi
  • Whelton, Paul K
subjects:
  • Adult
  • Antioxidants - analysis
  • Antioxidants - metabolism
  • Arterial hypertension. Arterial hypotension
  • Ascorbic Acid - blood
  • beta Carotene - blood
  • Biological and medical sciences
  • Blood and lymphatic vessels
  • Blood Pressure - physiology
  • Cardiology. Vascular system
  • Carotenoids - blood
  • Clinical manifestations. Epidemiology. Investigative techniques. Etiology
  • Continental Population Groups
  • Diastole - physiology
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Hypertension - blood
  • Hypertension - epidemiology
  • Hypertension - ethnology
  • Linear Models
  • Logistic Models
  • Male
  • Medical sciences
  • Middle Aged
  • Multivariate Analysis
  • Nutrition Surveys
  • Odds Ratio
  • Systole - physiology
  • United States - epidemiology
  • Vitamin A - blood
  • Vitamin E - blood
  • Vitamins - blood
ispartof: Hypertension, 2002, Vol.40 (6), p.810-816
description: ABSTRACT—Serum vitamin C has been inversely associated with blood pressure in several epidemiologic studies, but little is known about effect of other antioxidant vitamins. We examined the relation between serum vitamins A, C, and E, α-carotene, and β-carotene levels and blood pressure among 15 317 men and women ≥20 years of age who participated in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Blood pressure was characterized as the average of 6 measurements obtained over 2 visits by trained observers and hypertension was defined as blood pressure ≥140/90 mm Hg and/or taking antihypertensive medications. In multivariate models, a 1 SD difference in vitamin A (16.2 μg/dL) and vitamin E (20.4 μg/dL) was associated with a 43% (OR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.34 to 1.53) and 18% (OR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.09 to 1.27) higher odds of hypertension, respectively. A 1 SD difference in α-carotene (0.47 μg/dL) and β-carotene (496 μg/dL) was associated with a 16% (OR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.76 to 0.94) and 11% (OR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.82 to 0.97) lower odds of hypertension, respectively. In addition, serum vitamins A and E were positively and significantly associated with both systolic and diastolic blood pressure, whereas α-carotene and β-carotene were inversely and significantly associated with systolic and vitamin C associated with diastolic blood pressure in multivariate linear regression analyses. These findings indicate that antioxidant vitamins may be important in the underlying cause and prevention of hypertension. Further studies in this important area are warranted.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0194-911X
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0194-911X
  • 1524-4563
url: Link


@attributes
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
RANK2.2690113
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourceidproquest_cross
recordidTN_cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_72745357
sourceformatXML
sourcesystemPC
sourcerecordid276382141
originalsourceidFETCH-LOGICAL-14497-28139f67d1c03eb0057180eeaf8754a5b37e8fcd3b5660a399d79219597b5a0b0
addsrcrecordideNpdkd1u1DAQhSMEotvCK6CoEtwljB3_xNy1FVCkIlYqRXBlOcmEuCTOYjva9u3xdldaCV_Y0ug7M2eOs-ycQEmIIO-BlNe_1iXsTqWUoKWoq4qWXD3LVoRTVjAuqufZCohihSLk50l2GsI9AGGMyZfZCaFM1FzQVfb1Fv0y5Rcu2vnBdsbF_IeNZrIu5MZ1-eU4z12-9hjC4jG3Lo8D5nfORuzy22gihnw9b5bRpAbuVfaiN2PA14f3LLv79PH71XVx8-3zl6uLmyIZULKgNalUL2RHWqiwAeCS1IBo-lpyZnhTSaz7tqsaLgSYtGMnFSWKK9lwAw2cZe_2fTd-_rtgiHqyocVxNA7nJWhJJeMVlwk8_w-8nxfvkjdNge8oWifowx5q_RyCx15vvJ2Mf9QE9C5xDUSnxPUxcf2UuOYqid8cJizNhN1Reog4AW8PgAmtGXtvXGvDkUuJqGQkcWzPbecxog9_xmWLXg9oxjg8jWZU1AUFoCRdUOxKuw1hLxvs72FrPWozJY2PenjcoI_oQvoYMxjNQAtdE4B_hfGpBg
sourcetypeAggregation Database
isCDItrue
recordtypearticle
pqid205274528
display
typearticle
titleSerum Antioxidant Vitamins and Blood Pressure in the United States Population
creatorChen, Jing ; He, Jiang ; Hamm, Lee ; Batuman, Vecihi ; Whelton, Paul K
creatorcontribChen, Jing ; He, Jiang ; Hamm, Lee ; Batuman, Vecihi ; Whelton, Paul K
descriptionABSTRACT—Serum vitamin C has been inversely associated with blood pressure in several epidemiologic studies, but little is known about effect of other antioxidant vitamins. We examined the relation between serum vitamins A, C, and E, α-carotene, and β-carotene levels and blood pressure among 15 317 men and women ≥20 years of age who participated in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Blood pressure was characterized as the average of 6 measurements obtained over 2 visits by trained observers and hypertension was defined as blood pressure ≥140/90 mm Hg and/or taking antihypertensive medications. In multivariate models, a 1 SD difference in vitamin A (16.2 μg/dL) and vitamin E (20.4 μg/dL) was associated with a 43% (OR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.34 to 1.53) and 18% (OR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.09 to 1.27) higher odds of hypertension, respectively. A 1 SD difference in α-carotene (0.47 μg/dL) and β-carotene (496 μg/dL) was associated with a 16% (OR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.76 to 0.94) and 11% (OR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.82 to 0.97) lower odds of hypertension, respectively. In addition, serum vitamins A and E were positively and significantly associated with both systolic and diastolic blood pressure, whereas α-carotene and β-carotene were inversely and significantly associated with systolic and vitamin C associated with diastolic blood pressure in multivariate linear regression analyses. These findings indicate that antioxidant vitamins may be important in the underlying cause and prevention of hypertension. Further studies in this important area are warranted.
identifier
0ISSN: 0194-911X
1EISSN: 1524-4563
2DOI: 10.1161/01.HYP.0000039962.68332.59
3PMID: 12468562
4CODEN: HPRTDN
languageeng
publisherPhiladelphia, PA: Am Heart Assoc
subjectAdult ; Antioxidants - analysis ; Antioxidants - metabolism ; Arterial hypertension. Arterial hypotension ; Ascorbic Acid - blood ; beta Carotene - blood ; Biological and medical sciences ; Blood and lymphatic vessels ; Blood Pressure - physiology ; Cardiology. Vascular system ; Carotenoids - blood ; Clinical manifestations. Epidemiology. Investigative techniques. Etiology ; Continental Population Groups ; Diastole - physiology ; Female ; Humans ; Hypertension - blood ; Hypertension - epidemiology ; Hypertension - ethnology ; Linear Models ; Logistic Models ; Male ; Medical sciences ; Middle Aged ; Multivariate Analysis ; Nutrition Surveys ; Odds Ratio ; Systole - physiology ; United States - epidemiology ; Vitamin A - blood ; Vitamin E - blood ; Vitamins - blood
ispartofHypertension, 2002, Vol.40 (6), p.810-816
rights
02002 American Heart Association, Inc.
12003 INIST-CNRS
lds50peer_reviewed
oafree_for_read
citesFETCH-LOGICAL-14497-28139f67d1c03eb0057180eeaf8754a5b37e8fcd3b5660a399d79219597b5a0b0
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
thumbnail$$Usyndetics_thumb_exl
backlink
0$$Uhttp://pascal-francis.inist.fr/vibad/index.php?action=getRecordDetail&idt=14499274$$DView record in Pascal Francis
1$$Uhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12468562$$D View this record in MEDLINE/PubMed
search
creatorcontrib
0Chen, Jing
1He, Jiang
2Hamm, Lee
3Batuman, Vecihi
4Whelton, Paul K
title
0Serum Antioxidant Vitamins and Blood Pressure in the United States Population
1Hypertension
addtitleHypertension
descriptionABSTRACT—Serum vitamin C has been inversely associated with blood pressure in several epidemiologic studies, but little is known about effect of other antioxidant vitamins. We examined the relation between serum vitamins A, C, and E, α-carotene, and β-carotene levels and blood pressure among 15 317 men and women ≥20 years of age who participated in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Blood pressure was characterized as the average of 6 measurements obtained over 2 visits by trained observers and hypertension was defined as blood pressure ≥140/90 mm Hg and/or taking antihypertensive medications. In multivariate models, a 1 SD difference in vitamin A (16.2 μg/dL) and vitamin E (20.4 μg/dL) was associated with a 43% (OR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.34 to 1.53) and 18% (OR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.09 to 1.27) higher odds of hypertension, respectively. A 1 SD difference in α-carotene (0.47 μg/dL) and β-carotene (496 μg/dL) was associated with a 16% (OR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.76 to 0.94) and 11% (OR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.82 to 0.97) lower odds of hypertension, respectively. In addition, serum vitamins A and E were positively and significantly associated with both systolic and diastolic blood pressure, whereas α-carotene and β-carotene were inversely and significantly associated with systolic and vitamin C associated with diastolic blood pressure in multivariate linear regression analyses. These findings indicate that antioxidant vitamins may be important in the underlying cause and prevention of hypertension. Further studies in this important area are warranted.
subject
0Adult
1Antioxidants - analysis
2Antioxidants - metabolism
3Arterial hypertension. Arterial hypotension
4Ascorbic Acid - blood
5beta Carotene - blood
6Biological and medical sciences
7Blood and lymphatic vessels
8Blood Pressure - physiology
9Cardiology. Vascular system
10Carotenoids - blood
11Clinical manifestations. Epidemiology. Investigative techniques. Etiology
12Continental Population Groups
13Diastole - physiology
14Female
15Humans
16Hypertension - blood
17Hypertension - epidemiology
18Hypertension - ethnology
19Linear Models
20Logistic Models
21Male
22Medical sciences
23Middle Aged
24Multivariate Analysis
25Nutrition Surveys
26Odds Ratio
27Systole - physiology
28United States - epidemiology
29Vitamin A - blood
30Vitamin E - blood
31Vitamins - blood
issn
00194-911X
11524-4563
fulltextfalse
rsrctypearticle
creationdate2002
recordtypearticle
recordideNpdkd1u1DAQhSMEotvCK6CoEtwljB3_xNy1FVCkIlYqRXBlOcmEuCTOYjva9u3xdldaCV_Y0ug7M2eOs-ycQEmIIO-BlNe_1iXsTqWUoKWoq4qWXD3LVoRTVjAuqufZCohihSLk50l2GsI9AGGMyZfZCaFM1FzQVfb1Fv0y5Rcu2vnBdsbF_IeNZrIu5MZ1-eU4z12-9hjC4jG3Lo8D5nfORuzy22gihnw9b5bRpAbuVfaiN2PA14f3LLv79PH71XVx8-3zl6uLmyIZULKgNalUL2RHWqiwAeCS1IBo-lpyZnhTSaz7tqsaLgSYtGMnFSWKK9lwAw2cZe_2fTd-_rtgiHqyocVxNA7nJWhJJeMVlwk8_w-8nxfvkjdNge8oWifowx5q_RyCx15vvJ2Mf9QE9C5xDUSnxPUxcf2UuOYqid8cJizNhN1Reog4AW8PgAmtGXtvXGvDkUuJqGQkcWzPbecxog9_xmWLXg9oxjg8jWZU1AUFoCRdUOxKuw1hLxvs72FrPWozJY2PenjcoI_oQvoYMxjNQAtdE4B_hfGpBg
startdate20021201
enddate20021201
creator
0Chen, Jing
1He, Jiang
2Hamm, Lee
3Batuman, Vecihi
4Whelton, Paul K
general
0Am Heart Assoc
1American Heart Association, Inc
2Lippincott
scope
0IQODW
1CGR
2CUY
3CVF
4ECM
5EIF
6NPM
7AAYXX
8CITATION
9K9.
107X8
sort
creationdate20021201
titleSerum Antioxidant Vitamins and Blood Pressure in the United States Population
authorChen, Jing ; He, Jiang ; Hamm, Lee ; Batuman, Vecihi ; Whelton, Paul K
facets
frbrtype5
frbrgroupidcdi_FETCH-LOGICAL-14497-28139f67d1c03eb0057180eeaf8754a5b37e8fcd3b5660a399d79219597b5a0b0
rsrctypearticles
prefilterarticles
languageeng
creationdate2002
topic
0Adult
1Antioxidants - analysis
2Antioxidants - metabolism
3Arterial hypertension. Arterial hypotension
4Ascorbic Acid - blood
5beta Carotene - blood
6Biological and medical sciences
7Blood and lymphatic vessels
8Blood Pressure - physiology
9Cardiology. Vascular system
10Carotenoids - blood
11Clinical manifestations. Epidemiology. Investigative techniques. Etiology
12Continental Population Groups
13Diastole - physiology
14Female
15Humans
16Hypertension - blood
17Hypertension - epidemiology
18Hypertension - ethnology
19Linear Models
20Logistic Models
21Male
22Medical sciences
23Middle Aged
24Multivariate Analysis
25Nutrition Surveys
26Odds Ratio
27Systole - physiology
28United States - epidemiology
29Vitamin A - blood
30Vitamin E - blood
31Vitamins - blood
toplevelpeer_reviewed
creatorcontrib
0Chen, Jing
1He, Jiang
2Hamm, Lee
3Batuman, Vecihi
4Whelton, Paul K
collection
0Pascal-Francis
1Medline
2MEDLINE
3MEDLINE (Ovid)
4MEDLINE
5MEDLINE
6PubMed
7CrossRef
8ProQuest Health & Medical Complete (Alumni)
9MEDLINE - Academic
jtitleHypertension
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextno_fulltext
addata
au
0Chen, Jing
1He, Jiang
2Hamm, Lee
3Batuman, Vecihi
4Whelton, Paul K
formatjournal
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
atitleSerum Antioxidant Vitamins and Blood Pressure in the United States Population
jtitleHypertension
addtitleHypertension
date2002-12-01
risdate2002
volume40
issue6
spage810
epage816
pages810-816
issn0194-911X
eissn1524-4563
codenHPRTDN
abstractABSTRACT—Serum vitamin C has been inversely associated with blood pressure in several epidemiologic studies, but little is known about effect of other antioxidant vitamins. We examined the relation between serum vitamins A, C, and E, α-carotene, and β-carotene levels and blood pressure among 15 317 men and women ≥20 years of age who participated in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Blood pressure was characterized as the average of 6 measurements obtained over 2 visits by trained observers and hypertension was defined as blood pressure ≥140/90 mm Hg and/or taking antihypertensive medications. In multivariate models, a 1 SD difference in vitamin A (16.2 μg/dL) and vitamin E (20.4 μg/dL) was associated with a 43% (OR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.34 to 1.53) and 18% (OR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.09 to 1.27) higher odds of hypertension, respectively. A 1 SD difference in α-carotene (0.47 μg/dL) and β-carotene (496 μg/dL) was associated with a 16% (OR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.76 to 0.94) and 11% (OR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.82 to 0.97) lower odds of hypertension, respectively. In addition, serum vitamins A and E were positively and significantly associated with both systolic and diastolic blood pressure, whereas α-carotene and β-carotene were inversely and significantly associated with systolic and vitamin C associated with diastolic blood pressure in multivariate linear regression analyses. These findings indicate that antioxidant vitamins may be important in the underlying cause and prevention of hypertension. Further studies in this important area are warranted.
cop
0Philadelphia, PA
1Hagerstown, MD
pubAm Heart Assoc
pmid12468562
doi10.1161/01.HYP.0000039962.68332.59
oafree_for_read