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Heritability of Extinction Rates Links Diversification Patterns in Molecular Phylogenies and Fossils

Time-calibrated molecular phylogenies provide a valuable window into the tempo and mode of species diversification, especially for the large number of groups that lack adequate fossil records. Molecular phylogenetic data frequently suggest an initial “explosive speciation” phase, leading to widespre... Full description

Journal Title: Systematic biology 2009-10-05, Vol.58 (6), p.629-640
Main Author: Rabosky, Daniel L
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: England: Oxford University Press
ID: ISSN: 1063-5157
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20525614
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recordid: cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_733162751
title: Heritability of Extinction Rates Links Diversification Patterns in Molecular Phylogenies and Fossils
format: Article
creator:
  • Rabosky, Daniel L
subjects:
  • Adaptation, Biological - genetics
  • Adaptive radiation
  • approximate Bayesian computation
  • Bayes Theorem
  • Bayesian analysis
  • Biodiversity
  • Biological taxonomies
  • birth-death process
  • Classification - methods
  • Computer Simulation
  • Ecological modeling
  • Evolution & development
  • Evolution, Molecular
  • Extinct species
  • Extinction
  • Extinction, Biological
  • Fossils
  • Genetic diversity
  • Genetic Speciation
  • Heritability
  • macroevolution
  • Modeling
  • Models
  • Models, Theoretical
  • Molecular structure
  • Phylogenetics
  • Phylogeny
  • Speciation
  • Species extinction
  • Time Factors
ispartof: Systematic biology, 2009-10-05, Vol.58 (6), p.629-640
description: Time-calibrated molecular phylogenies provide a valuable window into the tempo and mode of species diversification, especially for the large number of groups that lack adequate fossil records. Molecular phylogenetic data frequently suggest an initial “explosive speciation” phase, leading to widespread speculation that ecological niche-filling processes might govern the dynamics of species diversification during evolutionary radiations. However, these patterns are difficult to reconcile with the fossil record. The fossil record strongly suggests that extinction rates have been high relative to speciation rates, but such elevated background extinction should erase the signal of early, rapid speciation from molecular phylogenies. For this reason, extinction rates in molecular phylogenies are frequently estimated as zero under the widely used birth–death model. Here, I construct a simple model that combines phylogenetically patterned extinction with pulsed turnover dynamics and constant diversity through time. Using approximate Bayesian methods, I show that heritable extinction can easily explain the phenomenon of explosive early diversification, even when net diversification rates are equal to zero. Several assumptions of the model are more consistent with both the fossil record and neontological data than the standard birth–death model and it may thus represent a viable alternative interpretation of phylogenetic diversification patterns. These results suggest that variation in the absolute rate of lineage turnover through time, in conjunction with phylogenetically nonrandom extinction, may underlie the apparent diversity-dependent speciation observed in molecular phylogenies.
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 1063-5157
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 1063-5157
  • 1076-836X
url: Link


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descriptionTime-calibrated molecular phylogenies provide a valuable window into the tempo and mode of species diversification, especially for the large number of groups that lack adequate fossil records. Molecular phylogenetic data frequently suggest an initial “explosive speciation” phase, leading to widespread speculation that ecological niche-filling processes might govern the dynamics of species diversification during evolutionary radiations. However, these patterns are difficult to reconcile with the fossil record. The fossil record strongly suggests that extinction rates have been high relative to speciation rates, but such elevated background extinction should erase the signal of early, rapid speciation from molecular phylogenies. For this reason, extinction rates in molecular phylogenies are frequently estimated as zero under the widely used birth–death model. Here, I construct a simple model that combines phylogenetically patterned extinction with pulsed turnover dynamics and constant diversity through time. Using approximate Bayesian methods, I show that heritable extinction can easily explain the phenomenon of explosive early diversification, even when net diversification rates are equal to zero. Several assumptions of the model are more consistent with both the fossil record and neontological data than the standard birth–death model and it may thus represent a viable alternative interpretation of phylogenetic diversification patterns. These results suggest that variation in the absolute rate of lineage turnover through time, in conjunction with phylogenetically nonrandom extinction, may underlie the apparent diversity-dependent speciation observed in molecular phylogenies.
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subjectAdaptation, Biological - genetics ; Adaptive radiation ; approximate Bayesian computation ; Bayes Theorem ; Bayesian analysis ; Biodiversity ; Biological taxonomies ; birth-death process ; Classification - methods ; Computer Simulation ; Ecological modeling ; Evolution & development ; Evolution, Molecular ; Extinct species ; Extinction ; Extinction, Biological ; Fossils ; Genetic diversity ; Genetic Speciation ; Heritability ; macroevolution ; Modeling ; Models ; Models, Theoretical ; Molecular structure ; Phylogenetics ; Phylogeny ; Speciation ; Species extinction ; Time Factors
ispartofSystematic biology, 2009-10-05, Vol.58 (6), p.629-640
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descriptionTime-calibrated molecular phylogenies provide a valuable window into the tempo and mode of species diversification, especially for the large number of groups that lack adequate fossil records. Molecular phylogenetic data frequently suggest an initial “explosive speciation” phase, leading to widespread speculation that ecological niche-filling processes might govern the dynamics of species diversification during evolutionary radiations. However, these patterns are difficult to reconcile with the fossil record. The fossil record strongly suggests that extinction rates have been high relative to speciation rates, but such elevated background extinction should erase the signal of early, rapid speciation from molecular phylogenies. For this reason, extinction rates in molecular phylogenies are frequently estimated as zero under the widely used birth–death model. Here, I construct a simple model that combines phylogenetically patterned extinction with pulsed turnover dynamics and constant diversity through time. Using approximate Bayesian methods, I show that heritable extinction can easily explain the phenomenon of explosive early diversification, even when net diversification rates are equal to zero. Several assumptions of the model are more consistent with both the fossil record and neontological data than the standard birth–death model and it may thus represent a viable alternative interpretation of phylogenetic diversification patterns. These results suggest that variation in the absolute rate of lineage turnover through time, in conjunction with phylogenetically nonrandom extinction, may underlie the apparent diversity-dependent speciation observed in molecular phylogenies.
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2approximate Bayesian computation
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4Bayesian analysis
5Biodiversity
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notesAssociate Editor: Vincent Savolainen
abstractTime-calibrated molecular phylogenies provide a valuable window into the tempo and mode of species diversification, especially for the large number of groups that lack adequate fossil records. Molecular phylogenetic data frequently suggest an initial “explosive speciation” phase, leading to widespread speculation that ecological niche-filling processes might govern the dynamics of species diversification during evolutionary radiations. However, these patterns are difficult to reconcile with the fossil record. The fossil record strongly suggests that extinction rates have been high relative to speciation rates, but such elevated background extinction should erase the signal of early, rapid speciation from molecular phylogenies. For this reason, extinction rates in molecular phylogenies are frequently estimated as zero under the widely used birth–death model. Here, I construct a simple model that combines phylogenetically patterned extinction with pulsed turnover dynamics and constant diversity through time. Using approximate Bayesian methods, I show that heritable extinction can easily explain the phenomenon of explosive early diversification, even when net diversification rates are equal to zero. Several assumptions of the model are more consistent with both the fossil record and neontological data than the standard birth–death model and it may thus represent a viable alternative interpretation of phylogenetic diversification patterns. These results suggest that variation in the absolute rate of lineage turnover through time, in conjunction with phylogenetically nonrandom extinction, may underlie the apparent diversity-dependent speciation observed in molecular phylogenies.
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