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Welfare state regimes, unemployment and health: a comparative study of the relationship between unemployment and self-reported health in 23 European countries

Background:The relationship between unemployment and increased risk of morbidity and mortality is well established. However, what is less clear is whether this relationship varies between welfare states with differing levels of social protection for the unemployed.Methods:The first (2002) and second... Full description

Journal Title: Journal of epidemiology and community health (1979) 2009-02, Vol.63 (2), p.92-98
Main Author: Bambra, C
Other Authors: Eikemo, T A
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Men
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: London: BMJ Publishing Group Ltd
ID: ISSN: 0143-005X
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recordid: cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_733917151
title: Welfare state regimes, unemployment and health: a comparative study of the relationship between unemployment and self-reported health in 23 European countries
format: Article
creator:
  • Bambra, C
  • Eikemo, T A
subjects:
  • Adult
  • Biological and medical sciences
  • Community health
  • Countries
  • Cross-Sectional Studies
  • Europe
  • Female
  • General aspects
  • Health aspects
  • Health Status
  • Health Status Disparities
  • Health surveys
  • Humans
  • Influence
  • Male
  • Medical sciences
  • Men
  • Middle Aged
  • Miscellaneous
  • Public health. Hygiene
  • Public health. Hygiene-occupational medicine
  • Reports
  • Research
  • Research reports
  • Self Disclosure
  • Self reports
  • Sex Factors
  • Social insurance
  • Social Security - statistics & numerical data
  • Social Welfare
  • Socioeconomic Factors
  • Unemployment
  • Unemployment - statistics & numerical data
  • Unemployment insurance
  • Welfare state
  • Womens health
  • Working women
ispartof: Journal of epidemiology and community health (1979), 2009-02, Vol.63 (2), p.92-98
description: Background:The relationship between unemployment and increased risk of morbidity and mortality is well established. However, what is less clear is whether this relationship varies between welfare states with differing levels of social protection for the unemployed.Methods:The first (2002) and second (2004) waves of the representative cross-sectional European Social Survey (37 499 respondents, aged 25–60 years). Employment status was main activity in the last 7 days. Health variables were self-reported limiting long-standing illness (LI) and fair/poor general health (PH). Data are for 23 European countries classified into five welfare state regimes (Scandinavian, Anglo-Saxon, Bismarckian, Southern and Eastern).Results:In all countries, unemployed people reported higher rates of poor health (LI, PH or both) than those in employment. There were also clear differences by welfare state regime: relative inequalities were largest in the Anglo-Saxon, Bismarckian and Scandinavian regimes. The negative health effect of unemployment was particularly strong for women, especially within the Anglo-Saxon (ORLI 2.73 and ORPH 2.78) and Scandinavian (ORLI 2.28 and ORPH 2.99) welfare state regimes.Discussion:The negative relationship between unemployment and health is consistent across Europe but varies by welfare state regime, suggesting that levels of social protection may indeed have a moderating influence. The especially strong negative relationship among women may well be because unemployed women are likely to receive lower than average wage replacement rates. Policy-makers’ attention therefore needs to be paid to income maintenance, and especially the extent to which the welfare state is able to support the needs of an increasingly feminised European workforce.
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 0143-005X
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0143-005X
  • 1470-2738
url: Link


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descriptionBackground:The relationship between unemployment and increased risk of morbidity and mortality is well established. However, what is less clear is whether this relationship varies between welfare states with differing levels of social protection for the unemployed.Methods:The first (2002) and second (2004) waves of the representative cross-sectional European Social Survey (37 499 respondents, aged 25–60 years). Employment status was main activity in the last 7 days. Health variables were self-reported limiting long-standing illness (LI) and fair/poor general health (PH). Data are for 23 European countries classified into five welfare state regimes (Scandinavian, Anglo-Saxon, Bismarckian, Southern and Eastern).Results:In all countries, unemployed people reported higher rates of poor health (LI, PH or both) than those in employment. There were also clear differences by welfare state regime: relative inequalities were largest in the Anglo-Saxon, Bismarckian and Scandinavian regimes. The negative health effect of unemployment was particularly strong for women, especially within the Anglo-Saxon (ORLI 2.73 and ORPH 2.78) and Scandinavian (ORLI 2.28 and ORPH 2.99) welfare state regimes.Discussion:The negative relationship between unemployment and health is consistent across Europe but varies by welfare state regime, suggesting that levels of social protection may indeed have a moderating influence. The especially strong negative relationship among women may well be because unemployed women are likely to receive lower than average wage replacement rates. Policy-makers’ attention therefore needs to be paid to income maintenance, and especially the extent to which the welfare state is able to support the needs of an increasingly feminised European workforce.
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subjectAdult ; Biological and medical sciences ; Community health ; Countries ; Cross-Sectional Studies ; Europe ; Female ; General aspects ; Health aspects ; Health Status ; Health Status Disparities ; Health surveys ; Humans ; Influence ; Male ; Medical sciences ; Men ; Middle Aged ; Miscellaneous ; Public health. Hygiene ; Public health. Hygiene-occupational medicine ; Reports ; Research ; Research reports ; Self Disclosure ; Self reports ; Sex Factors ; Social insurance ; Social Security - statistics & numerical data ; Social Welfare ; Socioeconomic Factors ; Unemployment ; Unemployment - statistics & numerical data ; Unemployment insurance ; Welfare state ; Womens health ; Working women
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descriptionBackground:The relationship between unemployment and increased risk of morbidity and mortality is well established. However, what is less clear is whether this relationship varies between welfare states with differing levels of social protection for the unemployed.Methods:The first (2002) and second (2004) waves of the representative cross-sectional European Social Survey (37 499 respondents, aged 25–60 years). Employment status was main activity in the last 7 days. Health variables were self-reported limiting long-standing illness (LI) and fair/poor general health (PH). Data are for 23 European countries classified into five welfare state regimes (Scandinavian, Anglo-Saxon, Bismarckian, Southern and Eastern).Results:In all countries, unemployed people reported higher rates of poor health (LI, PH or both) than those in employment. There were also clear differences by welfare state regime: relative inequalities were largest in the Anglo-Saxon, Bismarckian and Scandinavian regimes. The negative health effect of unemployment was particularly strong for women, especially within the Anglo-Saxon (ORLI 2.73 and ORPH 2.78) and Scandinavian (ORLI 2.28 and ORPH 2.99) welfare state regimes.Discussion:The negative relationship between unemployment and health is consistent across Europe but varies by welfare state regime, suggesting that levels of social protection may indeed have a moderating influence. The especially strong negative relationship among women may well be because unemployed women are likely to receive lower than average wage replacement rates. Policy-makers’ attention therefore needs to be paid to income maintenance, and especially the extent to which the welfare state is able to support the needs of an increasingly feminised European workforce.
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jtitleJournal of epidemiology and community health (1979)
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abstractBackground:The relationship between unemployment and increased risk of morbidity and mortality is well established. However, what is less clear is whether this relationship varies between welfare states with differing levels of social protection for the unemployed.Methods:The first (2002) and second (2004) waves of the representative cross-sectional European Social Survey (37 499 respondents, aged 25–60 years). Employment status was main activity in the last 7 days. Health variables were self-reported limiting long-standing illness (LI) and fair/poor general health (PH). Data are for 23 European countries classified into five welfare state regimes (Scandinavian, Anglo-Saxon, Bismarckian, Southern and Eastern).Results:In all countries, unemployed people reported higher rates of poor health (LI, PH or both) than those in employment. There were also clear differences by welfare state regime: relative inequalities were largest in the Anglo-Saxon, Bismarckian and Scandinavian regimes. The negative health effect of unemployment was particularly strong for women, especially within the Anglo-Saxon (ORLI 2.73 and ORPH 2.78) and Scandinavian (ORLI 2.28 and ORPH 2.99) welfare state regimes.Discussion:The negative relationship between unemployment and health is consistent across Europe but varies by welfare state regime, suggesting that levels of social protection may indeed have a moderating influence. The especially strong negative relationship among women may well be because unemployed women are likely to receive lower than average wage replacement rates. Policy-makers’ attention therefore needs to be paid to income maintenance, and especially the extent to which the welfare state is able to support the needs of an increasingly feminised European workforce.
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