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Primary Controls on Species Richness in Higher Taxa

The disparity in species richness across the tree of life is one of the most striking and pervasive features of biological diversity. Some groups are exceptionally diverse, whereas many other groups are species poor. Differences in diversity among groups are frequently assumed to result from primary... Full description

Journal Title: Systematic biology 2010-12, Vol.59 (6), p.634-645
Main Author: Rabosky, Daniel L
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: England: Oxford University Press
ID: ISSN: 1063-5157
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20926597
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title: Primary Controls on Species Richness in Higher Taxa
format: Article
creator:
  • Rabosky, Daniel L
subjects:
  • Adaptive radiation
  • Animals
  • Ants
  • Biodiversity
  • Biological diversity
  • Biological taxonomies
  • birth–death model
  • Ecological modeling
  • Ecology
  • Extinct species
  • extinction
  • Genetic Speciation
  • Likelihood Functions
  • macroevolution
  • Modeling
  • Models, Genetic
  • Phylogenetics
  • SOCIETY OF SYSTEMATIC BIOLOGISTS SYMPOSIUM ARTICLES
  • Speciation
  • Species
  • Species diversity
  • Species extinction
  • species richness
  • Systematic biology
  • Taxa
  • Taxonomy
ispartof: Systematic biology, 2010-12, Vol.59 (6), p.634-645
description: The disparity in species richness across the tree of life is one of the most striking and pervasive features of biological diversity. Some groups are exceptionally diverse, whereas many other groups are species poor. Differences in diversity among groups are frequently assumed to result from primary control by differential rates of net diversification. However, a major alternative explanation is that ecological and other factors exert primary control on clade diversity, such that apparent variation in net diversification rates is a secondary consequence of ecological limits on clade growth. Here, I consider a likelihood framework for distinguishing between these competing hypotheses. I incorporate hierarchical modeling to explicitly relax assumptions about the constancy of diversification rates across clades, and I propose several statistics for a posteriori evaluation of model adequacy. I apply the framework to a recent dated phylogeny of ants. My results reject the hypothesis that net diversification rates exert primary control on species richness in this group and demonstrate that clade diversity is better explained by total time-integrated speciation. These results further suggest that it may not possible to estimate meaningful speciation and extinction rates from higher-level phylogenies of extant taxa only.
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 1063-5157
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 1063-5157
  • 1076-836X
url: Link


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descriptionThe disparity in species richness across the tree of life is one of the most striking and pervasive features of biological diversity. Some groups are exceptionally diverse, whereas many other groups are species poor. Differences in diversity among groups are frequently assumed to result from primary control by differential rates of net diversification. However, a major alternative explanation is that ecological and other factors exert primary control on clade diversity, such that apparent variation in net diversification rates is a secondary consequence of ecological limits on clade growth. Here, I consider a likelihood framework for distinguishing between these competing hypotheses. I incorporate hierarchical modeling to explicitly relax assumptions about the constancy of diversification rates across clades, and I propose several statistics for a posteriori evaluation of model adequacy. I apply the framework to a recent dated phylogeny of ants. My results reject the hypothesis that net diversification rates exert primary control on species richness in this group and demonstrate that clade diversity is better explained by total time-integrated speciation. These results further suggest that it may not possible to estimate meaningful speciation and extinction rates from higher-level phylogenies of extant taxa only.
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subjectAdaptive radiation ; Animals ; Ants ; Biodiversity ; Biological diversity ; Biological taxonomies ; birth–death model ; Ecological modeling ; Ecology ; Extinct species ; extinction ; Genetic Speciation ; Likelihood Functions ; macroevolution ; Modeling ; Models, Genetic ; Phylogenetics ; SOCIETY OF SYSTEMATIC BIOLOGISTS SYMPOSIUM ARTICLES ; Speciation ; Species ; Species diversity ; Species extinction ; species richness ; Systematic biology ; Taxa ; Taxonomy
ispartofSystematic biology, 2010-12, Vol.59 (6), p.634-645
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0Copyright © 2010 Society of Systematic Biologists
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abstractThe disparity in species richness across the tree of life is one of the most striking and pervasive features of biological diversity. Some groups are exceptionally diverse, whereas many other groups are species poor. Differences in diversity among groups are frequently assumed to result from primary control by differential rates of net diversification. However, a major alternative explanation is that ecological and other factors exert primary control on clade diversity, such that apparent variation in net diversification rates is a secondary consequence of ecological limits on clade growth. Here, I consider a likelihood framework for distinguishing between these competing hypotheses. I incorporate hierarchical modeling to explicitly relax assumptions about the constancy of diversification rates across clades, and I propose several statistics for a posteriori evaluation of model adequacy. I apply the framework to a recent dated phylogeny of ants. My results reject the hypothesis that net diversification rates exert primary control on species richness in this group and demonstrate that clade diversity is better explained by total time-integrated speciation. These results further suggest that it may not possible to estimate meaningful speciation and extinction rates from higher-level phylogenies of extant taxa only.
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