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Serum C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and white blood cell count in acute hematogenous osteomyelitis of children

The aim of this prospective study was to compare the clinical value of the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), and white blood cell (WBC) count in diagnosis and follow-up of acute hematogenous osteomyelitis in children. Forty-four children aged 2 weeks to 14 years with ba... Full description

Journal Title: Pediatrics (Evanston) 1994, Vol.93 (1), p.59-62
Main Author: UNKILA-KALLIO, L
Other Authors: KALLIO, M. J. T , ESKOLA, J , PELTOLA, H
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics
ID: ISSN: 0031-4005
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recordid: cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_76323526
title: Serum C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and white blood cell count in acute hematogenous osteomyelitis of children
format: Article
creator:
  • UNKILA-KALLIO, L
  • KALLIO, M. J. T
  • ESKOLA, J
  • PELTOLA, H
subjects:
  • Abridged Index Medicus
  • Acute Disease
  • Adolescent
  • Bacterial arthritis and osteitis
  • Bacterial diseases
  • Biological and medical sciences
  • Blood Sedimentation
  • Bones
  • C-reactive protein
  • C-Reactive Protein - analysis
  • Child
  • Child, Preschool
  • Diagnosis
  • Erythrocyte sedimentation rate
  • Human bacterial diseases
  • Humans
  • Infant
  • Infant, Newborn
  • Infections
  • Infectious diseases
  • Leukocyte Count
  • Leukocytes
  • Measurement
  • Medical research
  • Medical sciences
  • Osteomyelitis
  • Osteomyelitis - blood
  • Osteomyelitis - diagnosis
  • Osteomyelitis - etiology
  • Pediatrics
  • Prospective Studies
  • White blood cells
ispartof: Pediatrics (Evanston), 1994, Vol.93 (1), p.59-62
description: The aim of this prospective study was to compare the clinical value of the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), and white blood cell (WBC) count in diagnosis and follow-up of acute hematogenous osteomyelitis in children. Forty-four children aged 2 weeks to 14 years with bacteriologically confirmed acute hematogenous osteomyelitis were examined. Staphylococcus aureus was responsible in 39 cases (89%), Haemophilus influenzae type b in 3 cases (7%), pneumococcus in 1 case (2%), and a microaerophilic streptococcus in 1 case (2%). ESR was measured at the time of admission and on days 3, 5, 7, 10, 14, 19, and 29 of treatment, and CRP was measured on the same days as ESR but also on days 2, 9, 12, 17, and 23. WBC count was examined at the time of admission and on days 5, 10, 19, and 29. ESR was elevated (> or = 20 mm/h) initially in 92% of the cases; the mean value was 45 mm/h, and the peak values (mean 58 mm/h) were reached on days 3 to 5. After this the levels slowly returned to normal in approximately 3 weeks (mean 18 days). CRP was elevated (> 19 mg/L) at the time of admission in 98% of the cases, the mean value being 71 mg/L. The peak CRP value was reached on day 2 (mean 83 mg/L). The decrease was very rapid, normal values being reached within a week (mean 6.9 days). The WBC count was a poor indicator of acute hematogenous osteomyelitis, since only 35% of the children had leukocytosis (WBCs > 12 x 10(9)/L) at the time of admission. In patients with acute hematogenous osteomyelitis, CRP increased and especially decreased significantly faster than ESR, reflecting the effectiveness of the therapy given and predicting recovery more sensitively than ESR or WBC count.
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 0031-4005
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0031-4005
  • 1098-4275
url: Link


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titleSerum C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and white blood cell count in acute hematogenous osteomyelitis of children
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descriptionThe aim of this prospective study was to compare the clinical value of the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), and white blood cell (WBC) count in diagnosis and follow-up of acute hematogenous osteomyelitis in children. Forty-four children aged 2 weeks to 14 years with bacteriologically confirmed acute hematogenous osteomyelitis were examined. Staphylococcus aureus was responsible in 39 cases (89%), Haemophilus influenzae type b in 3 cases (7%), pneumococcus in 1 case (2%), and a microaerophilic streptococcus in 1 case (2%). ESR was measured at the time of admission and on days 3, 5, 7, 10, 14, 19, and 29 of treatment, and CRP was measured on the same days as ESR but also on days 2, 9, 12, 17, and 23. WBC count was examined at the time of admission and on days 5, 10, 19, and 29. ESR was elevated (> or = 20 mm/h) initially in 92% of the cases; the mean value was 45 mm/h, and the peak values (mean 58 mm/h) were reached on days 3 to 5. After this the levels slowly returned to normal in approximately 3 weeks (mean 18 days). CRP was elevated (> 19 mg/L) at the time of admission in 98% of the cases, the mean value being 71 mg/L. The peak CRP value was reached on day 2 (mean 83 mg/L). The decrease was very rapid, normal values being reached within a week (mean 6.9 days). The WBC count was a poor indicator of acute hematogenous osteomyelitis, since only 35% of the children had leukocytosis (WBCs > 12 x 10(9)/L) at the time of admission. In patients with acute hematogenous osteomyelitis, CRP increased and especially decreased significantly faster than ESR, reflecting the effectiveness of the therapy given and predicting recovery more sensitively than ESR or WBC count.
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subjectAbridged Index Medicus ; Acute Disease ; Adolescent ; Bacterial arthritis and osteitis ; Bacterial diseases ; Biological and medical sciences ; Blood Sedimentation ; Bones ; C-reactive protein ; C-Reactive Protein - analysis ; Child ; Child, Preschool ; Diagnosis ; Erythrocyte sedimentation rate ; Human bacterial diseases ; Humans ; Infant ; Infant, Newborn ; Infections ; Infectious diseases ; Leukocyte Count ; Leukocytes ; Measurement ; Medical research ; Medical sciences ; Osteomyelitis ; Osteomyelitis - blood ; Osteomyelitis - diagnosis ; Osteomyelitis - etiology ; Pediatrics ; Prospective Studies ; White blood cells
ispartofPediatrics (Evanston), 1994, Vol.93 (1), p.59-62
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descriptionThe aim of this prospective study was to compare the clinical value of the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), and white blood cell (WBC) count in diagnosis and follow-up of acute hematogenous osteomyelitis in children. Forty-four children aged 2 weeks to 14 years with bacteriologically confirmed acute hematogenous osteomyelitis were examined. Staphylococcus aureus was responsible in 39 cases (89%), Haemophilus influenzae type b in 3 cases (7%), pneumococcus in 1 case (2%), and a microaerophilic streptococcus in 1 case (2%). ESR was measured at the time of admission and on days 3, 5, 7, 10, 14, 19, and 29 of treatment, and CRP was measured on the same days as ESR but also on days 2, 9, 12, 17, and 23. WBC count was examined at the time of admission and on days 5, 10, 19, and 29. ESR was elevated (> or = 20 mm/h) initially in 92% of the cases; the mean value was 45 mm/h, and the peak values (mean 58 mm/h) were reached on days 3 to 5. After this the levels slowly returned to normal in approximately 3 weeks (mean 18 days). CRP was elevated (> 19 mg/L) at the time of admission in 98% of the cases, the mean value being 71 mg/L. The peak CRP value was reached on day 2 (mean 83 mg/L). The decrease was very rapid, normal values being reached within a week (mean 6.9 days). The WBC count was a poor indicator of acute hematogenous osteomyelitis, since only 35% of the children had leukocytosis (WBCs > 12 x 10(9)/L) at the time of admission. In patients with acute hematogenous osteomyelitis, CRP increased and especially decreased significantly faster than ESR, reflecting the effectiveness of the therapy given and predicting recovery more sensitively than ESR or WBC count.
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0Abridged Index Medicus
1Acute Disease
2Adolescent
3Bacterial arthritis and osteitis
4Bacterial diseases
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6Blood Sedimentation
7Bones
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13Erythrocyte sedimentation rate
14Human bacterial diseases
15Humans
16Infant
17Infant, Newborn
18Infections
19Infectious diseases
20Leukocyte Count
21Leukocytes
22Measurement
23Medical research
24Medical sciences
25Osteomyelitis
26Osteomyelitis - blood
27Osteomyelitis - diagnosis
28Osteomyelitis - etiology
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30Prospective Studies
31White blood cells
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authorUNKILA-KALLIO, L ; KALLIO, M. J. T ; ESKOLA, J ; PELTOLA, H
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abstractThe aim of this prospective study was to compare the clinical value of the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), and white blood cell (WBC) count in diagnosis and follow-up of acute hematogenous osteomyelitis in children. Forty-four children aged 2 weeks to 14 years with bacteriologically confirmed acute hematogenous osteomyelitis were examined. Staphylococcus aureus was responsible in 39 cases (89%), Haemophilus influenzae type b in 3 cases (7%), pneumococcus in 1 case (2%), and a microaerophilic streptococcus in 1 case (2%). ESR was measured at the time of admission and on days 3, 5, 7, 10, 14, 19, and 29 of treatment, and CRP was measured on the same days as ESR but also on days 2, 9, 12, 17, and 23. WBC count was examined at the time of admission and on days 5, 10, 19, and 29. ESR was elevated (> or = 20 mm/h) initially in 92% of the cases; the mean value was 45 mm/h, and the peak values (mean 58 mm/h) were reached on days 3 to 5. After this the levels slowly returned to normal in approximately 3 weeks (mean 18 days). CRP was elevated (> 19 mg/L) at the time of admission in 98% of the cases, the mean value being 71 mg/L. The peak CRP value was reached on day 2 (mean 83 mg/L). The decrease was very rapid, normal values being reached within a week (mean 6.9 days). The WBC count was a poor indicator of acute hematogenous osteomyelitis, since only 35% of the children had leukocytosis (WBCs > 12 x 10(9)/L) at the time of admission. In patients with acute hematogenous osteomyelitis, CRP increased and especially decreased significantly faster than ESR, reflecting the effectiveness of the therapy given and predicting recovery more sensitively than ESR or WBC count.
copElk Grove Village, IL
pubAmerican Academy of Pediatrics
pmid8265325
doi10.1542/peds.93.1.59
tpages4