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Aids education for primary school children in Tanzania: an evaluation study

To test the effects of an HIV/AIDS education program. A quasi-experimental, nested cross-sectional design including baseline and 6-month follow-up surveys. Schools, stratified according to location, were randomly assigned to intervention (n = 6) or comparison conditions (n = 12). Public primary scho... Full description

Journal Title: AIDS (London) 1994, Vol.8 (8), p.1157-1162
Main Author: KLEPP, K.-I
Other Authors: NDEKI, S. S , SEHA, A. M , HANNAN, P , LYIMO, B. A , MSUYA, M. H , IREMA, M. N , SCHREINER, A
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: Hagerstown, MD: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
ID: ISSN: 0269-9370
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recordid: cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_76873145
title: Aids education for primary school children in Tanzania: an evaluation study
format: Article
creator:
  • KLEPP, K.-I
  • NDEKI, S. S
  • SEHA, A. M
  • HANNAN, P
  • LYIMO, B. A
  • MSUYA, M. H
  • IREMA, M. N
  • SCHREINER, A
subjects:
  • Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - prevention & control
  • Adolescent
  • AIDS/HIV
  • Biological and medical sciences
  • Cross-Sectional Studies
  • Female
  • Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
  • HIV Infections - epidemiology
  • HIV Infections - prevention & control
  • human immunodeficiency virus
  • Humans
  • Immunodeficiencies
  • Immunodeficiencies. Immunoglobulinopathies
  • Immunopathology
  • Male
  • Manuals as Topic
  • Medical sciences
  • Population
  • Risk Factors
  • Schools
  • Sex Education
  • Sexual Behavior
  • Tanzania
  • Teaching Materials
  • Tropical medicine
ispartof: AIDS (London), 1994, Vol.8 (8), p.1157-1162
description: To test the effects of an HIV/AIDS education program. A quasi-experimental, nested cross-sectional design including baseline and 6-month follow-up surveys. Schools, stratified according to location, were randomly assigned to intervention (n = 6) or comparison conditions (n = 12). Public primary schools in Arusha and Kilimanjaro regions, Tanzania. A total of 2026 sixth and seventh grade pupils (average age, 14.0 years) participated at baseline (85%) and 1785 at follow-up. The program was designed to reduce children's risk of HIV infection and to improve their tolerance of and care for people with AIDS. Local teachers and health workers attended a 1-week training workshop before implementing the program over a 2-3-month period (averaging 20 school hours per class). Self-reported exposure to AIDS information, communication regarding AIDS; AIDS knowledge, attitudes towards people with AIDS, attitudes towards having sexual intercourse, subjective norms regarding sexual intercourse, and intention to engage in sexual intercourse. Following this program, intervention pupils reported significantly higher scores for the following outcome measures than pupils attending the comparison schools: AIDS information (13.1 versus 10.5; P = 0.0001), AIDS communication (10.9 versus 7.8; P = 0.0001) AIDS knowledge (14.5 versus 11.5; P = 0.0001), attitudes towards people with AIDS (9.0 versus 6.7; P = 0.0008), subjective norms (45.5 versus 43.9; P = 0.011), and intention (1.3 versus 1.4; P = 0.020). No program effect was seen for attitudes towards sexual intercourse (47.0 versus 46.3, P = 0.44). These results indicate that it is feasible and effective to provide AIDS education for Tanzanian primary school children.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0269-9370
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0269-9370
  • 1473-5571
url: Link


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creatorKLEPP, K.-I ; NDEKI, S. S ; SEHA, A. M ; HANNAN, P ; LYIMO, B. A ; MSUYA, M. H ; IREMA, M. N ; SCHREINER, A
creatorcontribKLEPP, K.-I ; NDEKI, S. S ; SEHA, A. M ; HANNAN, P ; LYIMO, B. A ; MSUYA, M. H ; IREMA, M. N ; SCHREINER, A
descriptionTo test the effects of an HIV/AIDS education program. A quasi-experimental, nested cross-sectional design including baseline and 6-month follow-up surveys. Schools, stratified according to location, were randomly assigned to intervention (n = 6) or comparison conditions (n = 12). Public primary schools in Arusha and Kilimanjaro regions, Tanzania. A total of 2026 sixth and seventh grade pupils (average age, 14.0 years) participated at baseline (85%) and 1785 at follow-up. The program was designed to reduce children's risk of HIV infection and to improve their tolerance of and care for people with AIDS. Local teachers and health workers attended a 1-week training workshop before implementing the program over a 2-3-month period (averaging 20 school hours per class). Self-reported exposure to AIDS information, communication regarding AIDS; AIDS knowledge, attitudes towards people with AIDS, attitudes towards having sexual intercourse, subjective norms regarding sexual intercourse, and intention to engage in sexual intercourse. Following this program, intervention pupils reported significantly higher scores for the following outcome measures than pupils attending the comparison schools: AIDS information (13.1 versus 10.5; P = 0.0001), AIDS communication (10.9 versus 7.8; P = 0.0001) AIDS knowledge (14.5 versus 11.5; P = 0.0001), attitudes towards people with AIDS (9.0 versus 6.7; P = 0.0008), subjective norms (45.5 versus 43.9; P = 0.011), and intention (1.3 versus 1.4; P = 0.020). No program effect was seen for attitudes towards sexual intercourse (47.0 versus 46.3, P = 0.44). These results indicate that it is feasible and effective to provide AIDS education for Tanzanian primary school children.
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subjectAcquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - prevention & control ; Adolescent ; AIDS/HIV ; Biological and medical sciences ; Cross-Sectional Studies ; Female ; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice ; HIV Infections - epidemiology ; HIV Infections - prevention & control ; human immunodeficiency virus ; Humans ; Immunodeficiencies ; Immunodeficiencies. Immunoglobulinopathies ; Immunopathology ; Male ; Manuals as Topic ; Medical sciences ; Population ; Risk Factors ; Schools ; Sex Education ; Sexual Behavior ; Tanzania ; Teaching Materials ; Tropical medicine
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descriptionTo test the effects of an HIV/AIDS education program. A quasi-experimental, nested cross-sectional design including baseline and 6-month follow-up surveys. Schools, stratified according to location, were randomly assigned to intervention (n = 6) or comparison conditions (n = 12). Public primary schools in Arusha and Kilimanjaro regions, Tanzania. A total of 2026 sixth and seventh grade pupils (average age, 14.0 years) participated at baseline (85%) and 1785 at follow-up. The program was designed to reduce children's risk of HIV infection and to improve their tolerance of and care for people with AIDS. Local teachers and health workers attended a 1-week training workshop before implementing the program over a 2-3-month period (averaging 20 school hours per class). Self-reported exposure to AIDS information, communication regarding AIDS; AIDS knowledge, attitudes towards people with AIDS, attitudes towards having sexual intercourse, subjective norms regarding sexual intercourse, and intention to engage in sexual intercourse. Following this program, intervention pupils reported significantly higher scores for the following outcome measures than pupils attending the comparison schools: AIDS information (13.1 versus 10.5; P = 0.0001), AIDS communication (10.9 versus 7.8; P = 0.0001) AIDS knowledge (14.5 versus 11.5; P = 0.0001), attitudes towards people with AIDS (9.0 versus 6.7; P = 0.0008), subjective norms (45.5 versus 43.9; P = 0.011), and intention (1.3 versus 1.4; P = 0.020). No program effect was seen for attitudes towards sexual intercourse (47.0 versus 46.3, P = 0.44). These results indicate that it is feasible and effective to provide AIDS education for Tanzanian primary school children.
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2AIDS/HIV
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6Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
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abstractTo test the effects of an HIV/AIDS education program. A quasi-experimental, nested cross-sectional design including baseline and 6-month follow-up surveys. Schools, stratified according to location, were randomly assigned to intervention (n = 6) or comparison conditions (n = 12). Public primary schools in Arusha and Kilimanjaro regions, Tanzania. A total of 2026 sixth and seventh grade pupils (average age, 14.0 years) participated at baseline (85%) and 1785 at follow-up. The program was designed to reduce children's risk of HIV infection and to improve their tolerance of and care for people with AIDS. Local teachers and health workers attended a 1-week training workshop before implementing the program over a 2-3-month period (averaging 20 school hours per class). Self-reported exposure to AIDS information, communication regarding AIDS; AIDS knowledge, attitudes towards people with AIDS, attitudes towards having sexual intercourse, subjective norms regarding sexual intercourse, and intention to engage in sexual intercourse. Following this program, intervention pupils reported significantly higher scores for the following outcome measures than pupils attending the comparison schools: AIDS information (13.1 versus 10.5; P = 0.0001), AIDS communication (10.9 versus 7.8; P = 0.0001) AIDS knowledge (14.5 versus 11.5; P = 0.0001), attitudes towards people with AIDS (9.0 versus 6.7; P = 0.0008), subjective norms (45.5 versus 43.9; P = 0.011), and intention (1.3 versus 1.4; P = 0.020). No program effect was seen for attitudes towards sexual intercourse (47.0 versus 46.3, P = 0.44). These results indicate that it is feasible and effective to provide AIDS education for Tanzanian primary school children.
copHagerstown, MD
pubLippincott Williams & Wilkins
pmid7986415
doi10.1097/00002030-199408000-00019