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Investigation of the Morphology of the Lacunocanalicular System of Cortical Bone Using Atomic Force Microscopy

Mechanical loading has been implicated as a powerful driving mechanism for interstitial fluid flow through bone. However, little information is available with regard to the morphology of bone fluid spaces, e.g., the canalicular wall, which would be expected to dictate the type of flow regime develop... Full description

Journal Title: Annals of biomedical engineering 2001-12, Vol.29 (12), p.1074-1081
Main Author: Reilly, G C
Other Authors: Knapp, H F , Stemmer, A , Niederer, P , Knothe Tate, M L
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: United States: Springer Nature B.V
ID: ISSN: 0090-6964
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11853258
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recordid: cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_831178454
title: Investigation of the Morphology of the Lacunocanalicular System of Cortical Bone Using Atomic Force Microscopy
format: Article
creator:
  • Reilly, G C
  • Knapp, H F
  • Stemmer, A
  • Niederer, P
  • Knothe Tate, M L
subjects:
  • Animals
  • Artifacts
  • Atomic force microscopy
  • Bone
  • Bone Matrix - blood supply
  • Bone Matrix - ultrastructure
  • Casting
  • Cells
  • Collagen
  • Collagen - analysis
  • Etching
  • Female
  • Flow of fluids
  • Hydrochloric Acid - chemistry
  • Image Enhancement - methods
  • Metallurgy - methods
  • Methylmethacrylate
  • Microscopy, Atomic Force - methods
  • Morphology
  • Plastic Embedding - methods
  • Sensitivity and Specificity
  • Sheep
  • Tibia - blood supply
  • Tibia - ultrastructure
ispartof: Annals of biomedical engineering, 2001-12, Vol.29 (12), p.1074-1081
description: Mechanical loading has been implicated as a powerful driving mechanism for interstitial fluid flow through bone. However, little information is available with regard to the morphology of bone fluid spaces, e.g., the canalicular wall, which would be expected to dictate the type of flow regime developing in the lacunocanalicular system under mechanical loads. The purpose of this study was to examine the fine structure of the lacunocanalicular system in cortical bone using atomic force microscopy (AFM), resin casting methods, and selective etching of the specimen surface. A resin-cast replica of the canalicular wall was produced and surface morphology and dimensions were observed using AFM in tapping mode. Material contrast was obtained using surface potential measurements. A striped pattern perpendicular to the canaliculus long axis with a periodicity of 125 nm dominated the structure of the canalicular wall; it is likely that this was caused by the imprint of collagen fibrils arranged in parallel, lining the canaliculus wall. The largest dimension measured for canalicular diameter was on the order of 500 nm. The regular dips and ridges caused by the collagen that lines the wall are a source of roughness which may influence shear stresses imparted by the fluid on the cell surface as well as mixing of solutes within the lacunocanalicular system. In addition, the lacunocanalicular wall lining is likely to affect physicochemical interactions between the fluid and bone matrix. This has important implications for modeling and understanding the microfluid mechanics and rheology of the fluid-filled lacunocanalicular network.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0090-6964
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0090-6964
  • 1573-9686
url: Link


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titleInvestigation of the Morphology of the Lacunocanalicular System of Cortical Bone Using Atomic Force Microscopy
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descriptionMechanical loading has been implicated as a powerful driving mechanism for interstitial fluid flow through bone. However, little information is available with regard to the morphology of bone fluid spaces, e.g., the canalicular wall, which would be expected to dictate the type of flow regime developing in the lacunocanalicular system under mechanical loads. The purpose of this study was to examine the fine structure of the lacunocanalicular system in cortical bone using atomic force microscopy (AFM), resin casting methods, and selective etching of the specimen surface. A resin-cast replica of the canalicular wall was produced and surface morphology and dimensions were observed using AFM in tapping mode. Material contrast was obtained using surface potential measurements. A striped pattern perpendicular to the canaliculus long axis with a periodicity of 125 nm dominated the structure of the canalicular wall; it is likely that this was caused by the imprint of collagen fibrils arranged in parallel, lining the canaliculus wall. The largest dimension measured for canalicular diameter was on the order of 500 nm. The regular dips and ridges caused by the collagen that lines the wall are a source of roughness which may influence shear stresses imparted by the fluid on the cell surface as well as mixing of solutes within the lacunocanalicular system. In addition, the lacunocanalicular wall lining is likely to affect physicochemical interactions between the fluid and bone matrix. This has important implications for modeling and understanding the microfluid mechanics and rheology of the fluid-filled lacunocanalicular network.
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subjectAnimals ; Artifacts ; Atomic force microscopy ; Bone ; Bone Matrix - blood supply ; Bone Matrix - ultrastructure ; Casting ; Cells ; Collagen ; Collagen - analysis ; Etching ; Female ; Flow of fluids ; Hydrochloric Acid - chemistry ; Image Enhancement - methods ; Metallurgy - methods ; Methylmethacrylate ; Microscopy, Atomic Force - methods ; Morphology ; Plastic Embedding - methods ; Sensitivity and Specificity ; Sheep ; Tibia - blood supply ; Tibia - ultrastructure
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abstractMechanical loading has been implicated as a powerful driving mechanism for interstitial fluid flow through bone. However, little information is available with regard to the morphology of bone fluid spaces, e.g., the canalicular wall, which would be expected to dictate the type of flow regime developing in the lacunocanalicular system under mechanical loads. The purpose of this study was to examine the fine structure of the lacunocanalicular system in cortical bone using atomic force microscopy (AFM), resin casting methods, and selective etching of the specimen surface. A resin-cast replica of the canalicular wall was produced and surface morphology and dimensions were observed using AFM in tapping mode. Material contrast was obtained using surface potential measurements. A striped pattern perpendicular to the canaliculus long axis with a periodicity of 125 nm dominated the structure of the canalicular wall; it is likely that this was caused by the imprint of collagen fibrils arranged in parallel, lining the canaliculus wall. The largest dimension measured for canalicular diameter was on the order of 500 nm. The regular dips and ridges caused by the collagen that lines the wall are a source of roughness which may influence shear stresses imparted by the fluid on the cell surface as well as mixing of solutes within the lacunocanalicular system. In addition, the lacunocanalicular wall lining is likely to affect physicochemical interactions between the fluid and bone matrix. This has important implications for modeling and understanding the microfluid mechanics and rheology of the fluid-filled lacunocanalicular network.
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pmid11853258
doi10.1114/1.1424910