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Institutional Mechanisms for Unionization in Sixteen OECD Countries: An Analysis of Social Survey Data

A key debate in studies of unionization concerns the influence of structural characteristics of labor markets on labor organizing. Studies of national survey data reveal strong relationships between unionization and demographic, industrial, and occupational structures. By contrast, comparativists an... Full description

Journal Title: Social forces 1994, Vol.73 (2), p.497-519
Main Author: Western, B.
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: Chapel Hill, N.C: The University of North Carolina Press
ID: ISSN: 0037-7732
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recordid: cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_839019793
title: Institutional Mechanisms for Unionization in Sixteen OECD Countries: An Analysis of Social Survey Data
format: Article
creator:
  • Western, B.
subjects:
  • Collective bargaining
  • Corporatism
  • Crossnational studies
  • Employees
  • Employment
  • Industrial unions
  • Institutional aspects
  • Institutions
  • International Economic Organizations
  • Labor markets
  • Labor unionization
  • Labor unions
  • Labour market
  • OECD
  • Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD)
  • Political institutions
  • Politics
  • Polls & surveys
  • Social classes
  • Social Institutions
  • Social research
  • Social Structure
  • Social surveys
  • Surveys
  • Trade unionism
  • Unemployment insurance
  • Union organizing
  • Unionization
  • Unions
  • Working class
ispartof: Social forces, 1994, Vol.73 (2), p.497-519
description: A key debate in studies of unionization concerns the influence of structural characteristics of labor markets on labor organizing. Studies of national survey data reveal strong relationships between unionization and demographic, industrial, and occupational structures. By contrast, comparativists analyzing highly aggregated union density data emphasize the institutional determinants of labor organization. In this article I synthesize structural and institutional explanations of unionization in a multilevel analysis that combines social survey data and comparative institutional information from 16 countries of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. This analysis indicates that highly centralized collective bargaining and union-managed unemployment insurance schemes are associated with high and distinctively solidaristic patterns of unionization. More generally, the results suggests that institutions that displace market allocation with political control assist working-class organization in trade unions.
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 0037-7732
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0037-7732
  • 1534-7605
url: Link


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descriptionA key debate in studies of unionization concerns the influence of structural characteristics of labor markets on labor organizing. Studies of national survey data reveal strong relationships between unionization and demographic, industrial, and occupational structures. By contrast, comparativists analyzing highly aggregated union density data emphasize the institutional determinants of labor organization. In this article I synthesize structural and institutional explanations of unionization in a multilevel analysis that combines social survey data and comparative institutional information from 16 countries of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. This analysis indicates that highly centralized collective bargaining and union-managed unemployment insurance schemes are associated with high and distinctively solidaristic patterns of unionization. More generally, the results suggests that institutions that displace market allocation with political control assist working-class organization in trade unions.
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subjectCollective bargaining ; Corporatism ; Crossnational studies ; Employees ; Employment ; Industrial unions ; Institutional aspects ; Institutions ; International Economic Organizations ; Labor markets ; Labor unionization ; Labor unions ; Labour market ; OECD ; Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) ; Political institutions ; Politics ; Polls & surveys ; Social classes ; Social Institutions ; Social research ; Social Structure ; Social surveys ; Surveys ; Trade unionism ; Unemployment insurance ; Union organizing ; Unionization ; Unions ; Working class
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auWestern, B.
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atitleInstitutional Mechanisms for Unionization in Sixteen OECD Countries: An Analysis of Social Survey Data
jtitleSocial forces
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date1994-12
risdate1994
volume73
issue2
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epage519
pages497-519
issn0037-7732
eissn1534-7605
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notes
0Richard Berk, Sanford Jacoby, Ivan Szelenyi, Michael Wallerstein, and Maurice Zeitlin provided comments on earlier drafts. Jan de Leeuw provided very helpful statistical advice. Marty Pawlocki and Libby Stephenson at UCLA's Institute of Social Science Research provided invaluable data archival assistance. This article also greatly benefited from the comments of the editor and anonymous Social Forces reviewers.
1Direct all correspondence to Bruce Western, Department of Sociology, 2-N-2 Green Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544-1010.
abstractA key debate in studies of unionization concerns the influence of structural characteristics of labor markets on labor organizing. Studies of national survey data reveal strong relationships between unionization and demographic, industrial, and occupational structures. By contrast, comparativists analyzing highly aggregated union density data emphasize the institutional determinants of labor organization. In this article I synthesize structural and institutional explanations of unionization in a multilevel analysis that combines social survey data and comparative institutional information from 16 countries of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. This analysis indicates that highly centralized collective bargaining and union-managed unemployment insurance schemes are associated with high and distinctively solidaristic patterns of unionization. More generally, the results suggests that institutions that displace market allocation with political control assist working-class organization in trade unions.
copChapel Hill, N.C
pubThe University of North Carolina Press
doi10.1093/sf/73.2.497