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Biochar impact on development and productivity of pepper and tomato grown in fertigated soilless media

The impact of additions (1–5% by weight) of a nutrient-poor, wood-derived biochar on pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) and tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum Mill.) plant development and productivity in a coconut fibentuff growing mix under optimal fertigation conditions was examined. Pepper plant developmen... Full description

Journal Title: Plant and soil 2010, Vol.337 (1/2), p.481-496
Main Author: Graber, Ellen R
Other Authors: Meller Harel, Yael , Kolton, Max , Cytryn, Eddie , Silber, Avner , Rav David, Dalia , Tsechansky, Ludmilla , Borenshtein, Menahem , Elad, Yigal
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
RNA
Publisher: Dordrecht: Springer
ID: ISSN: 0032-079X
Link: http://pascal-francis.inist.fr/vibad/index.php?action=getRecordDetail&idt=23442690
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title: Biochar impact on development and productivity of pepper and tomato grown in fertigated soilless media
format: Article
creator:
  • Graber, Ellen R
  • Meller Harel, Yael
  • Kolton, Max
  • Cytryn, Eddie
  • Silber, Avner
  • Rav David, Dalia
  • Tsechansky, Ludmilla
  • Borenshtein, Menahem
  • Elad, Yigal
subjects:
  • Acid soils
  • Agricultural soils
  • Agronomy
  • Agronomy. Soil science and plant productions
  • Animal, plant and microbial ecology
  • Bacillus
  • Benzoic acid
  • Biochar
  • Biochemistry and biology
  • Biological and medical sciences
  • Biological control
  • Biomedical and Life Sciences
  • Capsicum annuum
  • Carbon
  • Chemical, physicochemical, biochemical and biological properties
  • Ecology
  • Fertilizers
  • Fruits
  • Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology
  • General agronomy. Plant production
  • Genetics
  • Hydroxy acids
  • Labor productivity
  • Life Sciences
  • Lycopersicon esculentum
  • Microbiology
  • Peppers
  • Pests
  • Physics, chemistry, biochemistry and biology of agricultural and forest soils
  • Phytopathology. Animal pests. Plant and forest protection
  • Plant growth
  • Plant Physiology
  • Plant Sciences
  • Planting
  • Plants
  • Regular Article
  • RNA
  • Soil microbiology
  • Soil science
  • Soil Science & Conservation
  • Soil-plant relationships. Soil fertility
  • Soil-plant relationships. Soil fertility. Fertilization. Amendments
ispartof: Plant and soil, 2010, Vol.337 (1/2), p.481-496
description: The impact of additions (1–5% by weight) of a nutrient-poor, wood-derived biochar on pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) and tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum Mill.) plant development and productivity in a coconut fibentuff growing mix under optimal fertigation conditions was examined. Pepper plant development in the biochar-treated pots was significantly enhanced as compared with the unamended controls. This was reflected by a system-wide increase in most measured plant parameters: leaf area, canopy dry weight, number of nodes, and yields of buds, flowers and fruit. In addition to the observed increases in plant growth and productivity, the rhizosphere of biochar-amended pepper plants had significantly greater abundances of culturable microbes belonging to prominent soil-associated groups. Phylogenetic characterization of unique bacterial isolates based on 16S rRNA gene analysis demonstrated that of the 20 unique identified isolates from roots and bulk soil from the char-amended growing mix, 16 were affiliated with previously described plant growth promoting and/or biocontrol agents. In tomato, biochar treatments positively enhanced plant height and leaf size, but had no effect on flower and fruit yield. The positive impacts of biochar on plant response were not due to direct or indirect effects on plant nutrition, as there were no differences between control and treatments in leaf nutrient content. Nor did biochar affect the field capacity of the soilless mixture. A number of organic compounds belonging to various chemical classes, including n-alkanoic acids, hydroxy and acetoxy acids, benzoic acids, diols, triols, and phenols were identified in organic solvent extracts of the biochar. We conjecture two related alternatives to explain the improved plant performance under biochar treatment: (i) the biochar stimulated shifts in microbial populations towards beneficial plant growth promoting rhizobacteria or fungi, due to either chemical or physical attributes of the biochar; or (ii) low doses of biochar chemicals, many of which are phytotoxic or biocidal at high concentrations, stimulated plant growth at low doses (hormesis).
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0032-079X
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0032-079X
  • 1573-5036
url: Link


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titleBiochar impact on development and productivity of pepper and tomato grown in fertigated soilless media
creatorGraber, Ellen R ; Meller Harel, Yael ; Kolton, Max ; Cytryn, Eddie ; Silber, Avner ; Rav David, Dalia ; Tsechansky, Ludmilla ; Borenshtein, Menahem ; Elad, Yigal
creatorcontribGraber, Ellen R ; Meller Harel, Yael ; Kolton, Max ; Cytryn, Eddie ; Silber, Avner ; Rav David, Dalia ; Tsechansky, Ludmilla ; Borenshtein, Menahem ; Elad, Yigal
descriptionThe impact of additions (1–5% by weight) of a nutrient-poor, wood-derived biochar on pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) and tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum Mill.) plant development and productivity in a coconut fibentuff growing mix under optimal fertigation conditions was examined. Pepper plant development in the biochar-treated pots was significantly enhanced as compared with the unamended controls. This was reflected by a system-wide increase in most measured plant parameters: leaf area, canopy dry weight, number of nodes, and yields of buds, flowers and fruit. In addition to the observed increases in plant growth and productivity, the rhizosphere of biochar-amended pepper plants had significantly greater abundances of culturable microbes belonging to prominent soil-associated groups. Phylogenetic characterization of unique bacterial isolates based on 16S rRNA gene analysis demonstrated that of the 20 unique identified isolates from roots and bulk soil from the char-amended growing mix, 16 were affiliated with previously described plant growth promoting and/or biocontrol agents. In tomato, biochar treatments positively enhanced plant height and leaf size, but had no effect on flower and fruit yield. The positive impacts of biochar on plant response were not due to direct or indirect effects on plant nutrition, as there were no differences between control and treatments in leaf nutrient content. Nor did biochar affect the field capacity of the soilless mixture. A number of organic compounds belonging to various chemical classes, including n-alkanoic acids, hydroxy and acetoxy acids, benzoic acids, diols, triols, and phenols were identified in organic solvent extracts of the biochar. We conjecture two related alternatives to explain the improved plant performance under biochar treatment: (i) the biochar stimulated shifts in microbial populations towards beneficial plant growth promoting rhizobacteria or fungi, due to either chemical or physical attributes of the biochar; or (ii) low doses of biochar chemicals, many of which are phytotoxic or biocidal at high concentrations, stimulated plant growth at low doses (hormesis).
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languageeng
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subjectAcid soils ; Agricultural soils ; Agronomy ; Agronomy. Soil science and plant productions ; Animal, plant and microbial ecology ; Bacillus ; Benzoic acid ; Biochar ; Biochemistry and biology ; Biological and medical sciences ; Biological control ; Biomedical and Life Sciences ; Capsicum annuum ; Carbon ; Chemical, physicochemical, biochemical and biological properties ; Ecology ; Fertilizers ; Fruits ; Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology ; General agronomy. Plant production ; Genetics ; Hydroxy acids ; Labor productivity ; Life Sciences ; Lycopersicon esculentum ; Microbiology ; Peppers ; Pests ; Physics, chemistry, biochemistry and biology of agricultural and forest soils ; Phytopathology. Animal pests. Plant and forest protection ; Plant growth ; Plant Physiology ; Plant Sciences ; Planting ; Plants ; Regular Article ; RNA ; Soil microbiology ; Soil science ; Soil Science & Conservation ; Soil-plant relationships. Soil fertility ; Soil-plant relationships. Soil fertility. Fertilization. Amendments
ispartofPlant and soil, 2010, Vol.337 (1/2), p.481-496
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1Meller Harel, Yael
2Kolton, Max
3Cytryn, Eddie
4Silber, Avner
5Rav David, Dalia
6Tsechansky, Ludmilla
7Borenshtein, Menahem
8Elad, Yigal
title
0Biochar impact on development and productivity of pepper and tomato grown in fertigated soilless media
1Plant and soil
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descriptionThe impact of additions (1–5% by weight) of a nutrient-poor, wood-derived biochar on pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) and tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum Mill.) plant development and productivity in a coconut fibentuff growing mix under optimal fertigation conditions was examined. Pepper plant development in the biochar-treated pots was significantly enhanced as compared with the unamended controls. This was reflected by a system-wide increase in most measured plant parameters: leaf area, canopy dry weight, number of nodes, and yields of buds, flowers and fruit. In addition to the observed increases in plant growth and productivity, the rhizosphere of biochar-amended pepper plants had significantly greater abundances of culturable microbes belonging to prominent soil-associated groups. Phylogenetic characterization of unique bacterial isolates based on 16S rRNA gene analysis demonstrated that of the 20 unique identified isolates from roots and bulk soil from the char-amended growing mix, 16 were affiliated with previously described plant growth promoting and/or biocontrol agents. In tomato, biochar treatments positively enhanced plant height and leaf size, but had no effect on flower and fruit yield. The positive impacts of biochar on plant response were not due to direct or indirect effects on plant nutrition, as there were no differences between control and treatments in leaf nutrient content. Nor did biochar affect the field capacity of the soilless mixture. A number of organic compounds belonging to various chemical classes, including n-alkanoic acids, hydroxy and acetoxy acids, benzoic acids, diols, triols, and phenols were identified in organic solvent extracts of the biochar. We conjecture two related alternatives to explain the improved plant performance under biochar treatment: (i) the biochar stimulated shifts in microbial populations towards beneficial plant growth promoting rhizobacteria or fungi, due to either chemical or physical attributes of the biochar; or (ii) low doses of biochar chemicals, many of which are phytotoxic or biocidal at high concentrations, stimulated plant growth at low doses (hormesis).
subject
0Acid soils
1Agricultural soils
2Agronomy
3Agronomy. Soil science and plant productions
4Animal, plant and microbial ecology
5Bacillus
6Benzoic acid
7Biochar
8Biochemistry and biology
9Biological and medical sciences
10Biological control
11Biomedical and Life Sciences
12Capsicum annuum
13Carbon
14Chemical, physicochemical, biochemical and biological properties
15Ecology
16Fertilizers
17Fruits
18Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology
19General agronomy. Plant production
20Genetics
21Hydroxy acids
22Labor productivity
23Life Sciences
24Lycopersicon esculentum
25Microbiology
26Peppers
27Pests
28Physics, chemistry, biochemistry and biology of agricultural and forest soils
29Phytopathology. Animal pests. Plant and forest protection
30Plant growth
31Plant Physiology
32Plant Sciences
33Planting
34Plants
35Regular Article
36RNA
37Soil microbiology
38Soil science
39Soil Science & Conservation
40Soil-plant relationships. Soil fertility
41Soil-plant relationships. Soil fertility. Fertilization. Amendments
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00032-079X
11573-5036
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titleBiochar impact on development and productivity of pepper and tomato grown in fertigated soilless media
authorGraber, Ellen R ; Meller Harel, Yael ; Kolton, Max ; Cytryn, Eddie ; Silber, Avner ; Rav David, Dalia ; Tsechansky, Ludmilla ; Borenshtein, Menahem ; Elad, Yigal
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0Acid soils
1Agricultural soils
2Agronomy
3Agronomy. Soil science and plant productions
4Animal, plant and microbial ecology
5Bacillus
6Benzoic acid
7Biochar
8Biochemistry and biology
9Biological and medical sciences
10Biological control
11Biomedical and Life Sciences
12Capsicum annuum
13Carbon
14Chemical, physicochemical, biochemical and biological properties
15Ecology
16Fertilizers
17Fruits
18Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology
19General agronomy. Plant production
20Genetics
21Hydroxy acids
22Labor productivity
23Life Sciences
24Lycopersicon esculentum
25Microbiology
26Peppers
27Pests
28Physics, chemistry, biochemistry and biology of agricultural and forest soils
29Phytopathology. Animal pests. Plant and forest protection
30Plant growth
31Plant Physiology
32Plant Sciences
33Planting
34Plants
35Regular Article
36RNA
37Soil microbiology
38Soil science
39Soil Science & Conservation
40Soil-plant relationships. Soil fertility
41Soil-plant relationships. Soil fertility. Fertilization. Amendments
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1Meller Harel, Yael
2Kolton, Max
3Cytryn, Eddie
4Silber, Avner
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7Borenshtein, Menahem
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atitleBiochar impact on development and productivity of pepper and tomato grown in fertigated soilless media
jtitlePlant and soil
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abstractThe impact of additions (1–5% by weight) of a nutrient-poor, wood-derived biochar on pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) and tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum Mill.) plant development and productivity in a coconut fibentuff growing mix under optimal fertigation conditions was examined. Pepper plant development in the biochar-treated pots was significantly enhanced as compared with the unamended controls. This was reflected by a system-wide increase in most measured plant parameters: leaf area, canopy dry weight, number of nodes, and yields of buds, flowers and fruit. In addition to the observed increases in plant growth and productivity, the rhizosphere of biochar-amended pepper plants had significantly greater abundances of culturable microbes belonging to prominent soil-associated groups. Phylogenetic characterization of unique bacterial isolates based on 16S rRNA gene analysis demonstrated that of the 20 unique identified isolates from roots and bulk soil from the char-amended growing mix, 16 were affiliated with previously described plant growth promoting and/or biocontrol agents. In tomato, biochar treatments positively enhanced plant height and leaf size, but had no effect on flower and fruit yield. The positive impacts of biochar on plant response were not due to direct or indirect effects on plant nutrition, as there were no differences between control and treatments in leaf nutrient content. Nor did biochar affect the field capacity of the soilless mixture. A number of organic compounds belonging to various chemical classes, including n-alkanoic acids, hydroxy and acetoxy acids, benzoic acids, diols, triols, and phenols were identified in organic solvent extracts of the biochar. We conjecture two related alternatives to explain the improved plant performance under biochar treatment: (i) the biochar stimulated shifts in microbial populations towards beneficial plant growth promoting rhizobacteria or fungi, due to either chemical or physical attributes of the biochar; or (ii) low doses of biochar chemicals, many of which are phytotoxic or biocidal at high concentrations, stimulated plant growth at low doses (hormesis).
copDordrecht
pubSpringer
doi10.1007/s11104-010-0544-6