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50-year mortality trends in children and young people: a study of 50 low-income, middle-income, and high-income countries

Summary Background Global attention has focused on mortality in children younger than 5 years. We analysed global mortality data for people aged 1–24 years across a 50-year period. Methods The WHO mortality database was used to obtain mortality data from 1955 to 2004, by age-group (1–4, 5–9, 10–14,... Full description

Journal Title: The Lancet (British edition) 2011, Vol.377 (9772), p.1162-1174
Main Author: Viner, Russell M, Dr
Other Authors: Coffey, Carolyn, GradDipEpi , Mathers, Colin, PhD , Bloem, Paul, MBA , Costello, Anthony, Prof , Santelli, John, Prof , Patton, George C, Prof
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: Kidlington: Elsevier Ltd
ID: ISSN: 0140-6736
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title: 50-year mortality trends in children and young people: a study of 50 low-income, middle-income, and high-income countries
format: Article
creator:
  • Viner, Russell M, Dr
  • Coffey, Carolyn, GradDipEpi
  • Mathers, Colin, PhD
  • Bloem, Paul, MBA
  • Costello, Anthony, Prof
  • Santelli, John, Prof
  • Patton, George C, Prof
subjects:
  • Abridged Index Medicus
  • Adolescent
  • Age Distribution
  • Alliances
  • Analysis
  • Australia
  • Biological and medical sciences
  • Cause of Death
  • Central America - epidemiology
  • Child
  • Child, Preschool
  • Children & youth
  • Communicable Diseases - mortality
  • Databases
  • Demographic aspects
  • Developed Countries - economics
  • Developed Countries - statistics & numerical data
  • Developing Countries - economics
  • Developing Countries - statistics & numerical data
  • Disease
  • Epidemiology
  • Europe, Eastern - epidemiology
  • Female
  • General aspects
  • Global Health
  • Humans
  • Infant
  • Injuries
  • Internal Medicine
  • Low income groups
  • Male
  • Medical sciences
  • Miscellaneous
  • Mortality
  • Mortality - trends
  • Public health. Hygiene
  • Public health. Hygiene-occupational medicine
  • Purchasing power parity
  • Retrospective Studies
  • Sex Distribution
  • South America - epidemiology
  • Studies
  • United Kingdom
  • United States
  • Wounds and Injuries - mortality
  • Young Adult
ispartof: The Lancet (British edition), 2011, Vol.377 (9772), p.1162-1174
description: Summary Background Global attention has focused on mortality in children younger than 5 years. We analysed global mortality data for people aged 1–24 years across a 50-year period. Methods The WHO mortality database was used to obtain mortality data from 1955 to 2004, by age-group (1–4, 5–9, 10–14, 15–19, and 20–24 years) and stratified by sex. To analyse change in mortality, we calculated mortality rates averaged over three 5-year periods (1955–59, 1978–82, and 2000–04) to investigate trends in deaths caused by communicable and non-communicable diseases and injury. Findings Data were available for 50 countries (ten high income, 22 middle income, eight low income, seven very low income, and three unclassified), grouped as Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries, Central and South American countries, eastern European countries and ex-Soviet states, and other countries. In 1955, mortality was highest in the 1–4-year age-group. Across the study period, all-cause mortality reduced by 85–93% in children aged 1–4 years, 80–87% in children aged 5–9 years, and 68–78% in young people aged 10–14 years in OECD, Central and South American, and other countries. Smaller declines (41–48%) were recorded in young men (15–24 years), and by 2000–04, mortality in this group was two-to-three times higher than that in young boys (1–4 years). Mortality in young women (15–24 years) was equal to that of young girls (1–4 years) from 2000 onwards. Substantial declines in death caused by communicable diseases were seen in all age-groups and regions, although communicable and non-communicable diseases remained the main causes of death in children (1–9 years) and young women (10–24 years). Injury was the dominant cause of death in young men (10–24 years) in all regions by the late 1970s. Interpretation Adolescents and young adults have benefited from the epidemiological transition less than children have, with a reversal of traditional mortality patterns over the past 50 years. Future global health targets should include a focus on the health problems of people aged 10–24 years. Funding None.
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 0140-6736
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0140-6736
  • 1474-547X
url: Link


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title50-year mortality trends in children and young people: a study of 50 low-income, middle-income, and high-income countries
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creatorViner, Russell M, Dr ; Coffey, Carolyn, GradDipEpi ; Mathers, Colin, PhD ; Bloem, Paul, MBA ; Costello, Anthony, Prof ; Santelli, John, Prof ; Patton, George C, Prof
creatorcontribViner, Russell M, Dr ; Coffey, Carolyn, GradDipEpi ; Mathers, Colin, PhD ; Bloem, Paul, MBA ; Costello, Anthony, Prof ; Santelli, John, Prof ; Patton, George C, Prof
descriptionSummary Background Global attention has focused on mortality in children younger than 5 years. We analysed global mortality data for people aged 1–24 years across a 50-year period. Methods The WHO mortality database was used to obtain mortality data from 1955 to 2004, by age-group (1–4, 5–9, 10–14, 15–19, and 20–24 years) and stratified by sex. To analyse change in mortality, we calculated mortality rates averaged over three 5-year periods (1955–59, 1978–82, and 2000–04) to investigate trends in deaths caused by communicable and non-communicable diseases and injury. Findings Data were available for 50 countries (ten high income, 22 middle income, eight low income, seven very low income, and three unclassified), grouped as Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries, Central and South American countries, eastern European countries and ex-Soviet states, and other countries. In 1955, mortality was highest in the 1–4-year age-group. Across the study period, all-cause mortality reduced by 85–93% in children aged 1–4 years, 80–87% in children aged 5–9 years, and 68–78% in young people aged 10–14 years in OECD, Central and South American, and other countries. Smaller declines (41–48%) were recorded in young men (15–24 years), and by 2000–04, mortality in this group was two-to-three times higher than that in young boys (1–4 years). Mortality in young women (15–24 years) was equal to that of young girls (1–4 years) from 2000 onwards. Substantial declines in death caused by communicable diseases were seen in all age-groups and regions, although communicable and non-communicable diseases remained the main causes of death in children (1–9 years) and young women (10–24 years). Injury was the dominant cause of death in young men (10–24 years) in all regions by the late 1970s. Interpretation Adolescents and young adults have benefited from the epidemiological transition less than children have, with a reversal of traditional mortality patterns over the past 50 years. Future global health targets should include a focus on the health problems of people aged 10–24 years. Funding None.
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subjectAbridged Index Medicus ; Adolescent ; Age Distribution ; Alliances ; Analysis ; Australia ; Biological and medical sciences ; Cause of Death ; Central America - epidemiology ; Child ; Child, Preschool ; Children & youth ; Communicable Diseases - mortality ; Databases ; Demographic aspects ; Developed Countries - economics ; Developed Countries - statistics & numerical data ; Developing Countries - economics ; Developing Countries - statistics & numerical data ; Disease ; Epidemiology ; Europe, Eastern - epidemiology ; Female ; General aspects ; Global Health ; Humans ; Infant ; Injuries ; Internal Medicine ; Low income groups ; Male ; Medical sciences ; Miscellaneous ; Mortality ; Mortality - trends ; Public health. Hygiene ; Public health. Hygiene-occupational medicine ; Purchasing power parity ; Retrospective Studies ; Sex Distribution ; South America - epidemiology ; Studies ; United Kingdom ; United States ; Wounds and Injuries - mortality ; Young Adult
ispartofThe Lancet (British edition), 2011, Vol.377 (9772), p.1162-1174
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title
050-year mortality trends in children and young people: a study of 50 low-income, middle-income, and high-income countries
1The Lancet (British edition)
addtitleLancet
descriptionSummary Background Global attention has focused on mortality in children younger than 5 years. We analysed global mortality data for people aged 1–24 years across a 50-year period. Methods The WHO mortality database was used to obtain mortality data from 1955 to 2004, by age-group (1–4, 5–9, 10–14, 15–19, and 20–24 years) and stratified by sex. To analyse change in mortality, we calculated mortality rates averaged over three 5-year periods (1955–59, 1978–82, and 2000–04) to investigate trends in deaths caused by communicable and non-communicable diseases and injury. Findings Data were available for 50 countries (ten high income, 22 middle income, eight low income, seven very low income, and three unclassified), grouped as Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries, Central and South American countries, eastern European countries and ex-Soviet states, and other countries. In 1955, mortality was highest in the 1–4-year age-group. Across the study period, all-cause mortality reduced by 85–93% in children aged 1–4 years, 80–87% in children aged 5–9 years, and 68–78% in young people aged 10–14 years in OECD, Central and South American, and other countries. Smaller declines (41–48%) were recorded in young men (15–24 years), and by 2000–04, mortality in this group was two-to-three times higher than that in young boys (1–4 years). Mortality in young women (15–24 years) was equal to that of young girls (1–4 years) from 2000 onwards. Substantial declines in death caused by communicable diseases were seen in all age-groups and regions, although communicable and non-communicable diseases remained the main causes of death in children (1–9 years) and young women (10–24 years). Injury was the dominant cause of death in young men (10–24 years) in all regions by the late 1970s. Interpretation Adolescents and young adults have benefited from the epidemiological transition less than children have, with a reversal of traditional mortality patterns over the past 50 years. Future global health targets should include a focus on the health problems of people aged 10–24 years. Funding None.
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9Child
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13Databases
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15Developed Countries - economics
16Developed Countries - statistics & numerical data
17Developing Countries - economics
18Developing Countries - statistics & numerical data
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20Epidemiology
21Europe, Eastern - epidemiology
22Female
23General aspects
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25Humans
26Infant
27Injuries
28Internal Medicine
29Low income groups
30Male
31Medical sciences
32Miscellaneous
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34Mortality - trends
35Public health. Hygiene
36Public health. Hygiene-occupational medicine
37Purchasing power parity
38Retrospective Studies
39Sex Distribution
40South America - epidemiology
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42United Kingdom
43United States
44Wounds and Injuries - mortality
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title50-year mortality trends in children and young people: a study of 50 low-income, middle-income, and high-income countries
authorViner, Russell M, Dr ; Coffey, Carolyn, GradDipEpi ; Mathers, Colin, PhD ; Bloem, Paul, MBA ; Costello, Anthony, Prof ; Santelli, John, Prof ; Patton, George C, Prof
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1Adolescent
2Age Distribution
3Alliances
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5Australia
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8Central America - epidemiology
9Child
10Child, Preschool
11Children & youth
12Communicable Diseases - mortality
13Databases
14Demographic aspects
15Developed Countries - economics
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17Developing Countries - economics
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abstractSummary Background Global attention has focused on mortality in children younger than 5 years. We analysed global mortality data for people aged 1–24 years across a 50-year period. Methods The WHO mortality database was used to obtain mortality data from 1955 to 2004, by age-group (1–4, 5–9, 10–14, 15–19, and 20–24 years) and stratified by sex. To analyse change in mortality, we calculated mortality rates averaged over three 5-year periods (1955–59, 1978–82, and 2000–04) to investigate trends in deaths caused by communicable and non-communicable diseases and injury. Findings Data were available for 50 countries (ten high income, 22 middle income, eight low income, seven very low income, and three unclassified), grouped as Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries, Central and South American countries, eastern European countries and ex-Soviet states, and other countries. In 1955, mortality was highest in the 1–4-year age-group. Across the study period, all-cause mortality reduced by 85–93% in children aged 1–4 years, 80–87% in children aged 5–9 years, and 68–78% in young people aged 10–14 years in OECD, Central and South American, and other countries. Smaller declines (41–48%) were recorded in young men (15–24 years), and by 2000–04, mortality in this group was two-to-three times higher than that in young boys (1–4 years). Mortality in young women (15–24 years) was equal to that of young girls (1–4 years) from 2000 onwards. Substantial declines in death caused by communicable diseases were seen in all age-groups and regions, although communicable and non-communicable diseases remained the main causes of death in children (1–9 years) and young women (10–24 years). Injury was the dominant cause of death in young men (10–24 years) in all regions by the late 1970s. Interpretation Adolescents and young adults have benefited from the epidemiological transition less than children have, with a reversal of traditional mortality patterns over the past 50 years. Future global health targets should include a focus on the health problems of people aged 10–24 years. Funding None.
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pubElsevier Ltd
pmid21450338
doi10.1016/S0140-6736(11)60106-2