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Distribution of phosphorus in an above-to-below-ground profile in a Bornean tropical rain forest

Ecosystem pool of phosphorus (P) was determined as the sum of above-ground vegetation, roots, necromass and soils to 1 m deep in a tropical rain forest in Sabah, Malaysia. Relationships among soil P fractions, acid phosphatase activity and fine-root biomass across soil horizons were also determined... Full description

Journal Title: Journal of tropical ecology 2010, Vol.26 (6), p.627-636
Main Author: Imai, Nobuo
Other Authors: Kitayama, Kanehiro , Titin, Jupiri
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press
ID: ISSN: 0266-4674
Link: http://pascal-francis.inist.fr/vibad/index.php?action=getRecordDetail&idt=23347727
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recordid: cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_867751952
title: Distribution of phosphorus in an above-to-below-ground profile in a Bornean tropical rain forest
format: Article
creator:
  • Imai, Nobuo
  • Kitayama, Kanehiro
  • Titin, Jupiri
subjects:
  • Acid phosphatase
  • acid phosphatase activity
  • Acid soils
  • Animal and plant ecology
  • Animal, plant and microbial ecology
  • Biochemistry
  • Biological and medical sciences
  • coarse woody debris
  • Ecology
  • Forest ecology
  • Forest soils
  • Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology
  • Mineral soils
  • nutrient limitation
  • Organic soils
  • Phosphorus
  • Rainforests
  • selective logging
  • Soil ecology
  • Soil horizons
  • soil phosphorus fractionation
  • Soil sciences
  • Synecology
  • Terrestrial ecosystems
  • Tropical rain forests
  • Tropical soils
ispartof: Journal of tropical ecology, 2010, Vol.26 (6), p.627-636
description: Ecosystem pool of phosphorus (P) was determined as the sum of above-ground vegetation, roots, necromass and soils to 1 m deep in a tropical rain forest in Sabah, Malaysia. Relationships among soil P fractions, acid phosphatase activity and fine-root biomass across soil horizons were also determined to understand P availability. Ecosystem pools of P, and of simultaneously quantified nitrogen (N) and carbon (C) were 3.4, 12 and 370 Mg ha−1, respectively. Only 2.6% of the total ecosystem P was in the above-ground vegetation, contrasting to C (60%) and N (16%). Canopy foliage of dominant tree species showed an extremely high N to P ratio of 31.5, which implied the excessively short supply of P compared with ample N. Soil P primarily consisted of recalcitrant occluded fractions (78–91%) and only 4% was labile. Approximately three-quarters of labile soil P was an organic fraction (Po). The concentration of labile Po did not differ between soil horizons, while both phosphatase activity and fine-root density were the greatest in the topsoil (top 5 cm) and dramatically decreased with depth. This suggests that trees depend on the acquisition of P from the labile Po in the topsoil, despite a greater amount of labile P in the subsoil. Trees with a high foliar N/P ratio may invest N to acquire P from the topsoil by secreting phosphatase that consists of proteins, rather than investing C to extending roots to scavenge P in the subsoil.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0266-4674
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0266-4674
  • 1469-7831
url: Link


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titleDistribution of phosphorus in an above-to-below-ground profile in a Bornean tropical rain forest
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descriptionEcosystem pool of phosphorus (P) was determined as the sum of above-ground vegetation, roots, necromass and soils to 1 m deep in a tropical rain forest in Sabah, Malaysia. Relationships among soil P fractions, acid phosphatase activity and fine-root biomass across soil horizons were also determined to understand P availability. Ecosystem pools of P, and of simultaneously quantified nitrogen (N) and carbon (C) were 3.4, 12 and 370 Mg ha−1, respectively. Only 2.6% of the total ecosystem P was in the above-ground vegetation, contrasting to C (60%) and N (16%). Canopy foliage of dominant tree species showed an extremely high N to P ratio of 31.5, which implied the excessively short supply of P compared with ample N. Soil P primarily consisted of recalcitrant occluded fractions (78–91%) and only 4% was labile. Approximately three-quarters of labile soil P was an organic fraction (Po). The concentration of labile Po did not differ between soil horizons, while both phosphatase activity and fine-root density were the greatest in the topsoil (top 5 cm) and dramatically decreased with depth. This suggests that trees depend on the acquisition of P from the labile Po in the topsoil, despite a greater amount of labile P in the subsoil. Trees with a high foliar N/P ratio may invest N to acquire P from the topsoil by secreting phosphatase that consists of proteins, rather than investing C to extending roots to scavenge P in the subsoil.
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subjectAcid phosphatase ; acid phosphatase activity ; Acid soils ; Animal and plant ecology ; Animal, plant and microbial ecology ; Biochemistry ; Biological and medical sciences ; coarse woody debris ; Ecology ; Forest ecology ; Forest soils ; Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology ; Mineral soils ; nutrient limitation ; Organic soils ; Phosphorus ; Rainforests ; selective logging ; Soil ecology ; Soil horizons ; soil phosphorus fractionation ; Soil sciences ; Synecology ; Terrestrial ecosystems ; Tropical rain forests ; Tropical soils
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descriptionEcosystem pool of phosphorus (P) was determined as the sum of above-ground vegetation, roots, necromass and soils to 1 m deep in a tropical rain forest in Sabah, Malaysia. Relationships among soil P fractions, acid phosphatase activity and fine-root biomass across soil horizons were also determined to understand P availability. Ecosystem pools of P, and of simultaneously quantified nitrogen (N) and carbon (C) were 3.4, 12 and 370 Mg ha−1, respectively. Only 2.6% of the total ecosystem P was in the above-ground vegetation, contrasting to C (60%) and N (16%). Canopy foliage of dominant tree species showed an extremely high N to P ratio of 31.5, which implied the excessively short supply of P compared with ample N. Soil P primarily consisted of recalcitrant occluded fractions (78–91%) and only 4% was labile. Approximately three-quarters of labile soil P was an organic fraction (Po). The concentration of labile Po did not differ between soil horizons, while both phosphatase activity and fine-root density were the greatest in the topsoil (top 5 cm) and dramatically decreased with depth. This suggests that trees depend on the acquisition of P from the labile Po in the topsoil, despite a greater amount of labile P in the subsoil. Trees with a high foliar N/P ratio may invest N to acquire P from the topsoil by secreting phosphatase that consists of proteins, rather than investing C to extending roots to scavenge P in the subsoil.
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5Biochemistry
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7coarse woody debris
8Ecology
9Forest ecology
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14Organic soils
15Phosphorus
16Rainforests
17selective logging
18Soil ecology
19Soil horizons
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21Soil sciences
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abstractEcosystem pool of phosphorus (P) was determined as the sum of above-ground vegetation, roots, necromass and soils to 1 m deep in a tropical rain forest in Sabah, Malaysia. Relationships among soil P fractions, acid phosphatase activity and fine-root biomass across soil horizons were also determined to understand P availability. Ecosystem pools of P, and of simultaneously quantified nitrogen (N) and carbon (C) were 3.4, 12 and 370 Mg ha−1, respectively. Only 2.6% of the total ecosystem P was in the above-ground vegetation, contrasting to C (60%) and N (16%). Canopy foliage of dominant tree species showed an extremely high N to P ratio of 31.5, which implied the excessively short supply of P compared with ample N. Soil P primarily consisted of recalcitrant occluded fractions (78–91%) and only 4% was labile. Approximately three-quarters of labile soil P was an organic fraction (Po). The concentration of labile Po did not differ between soil horizons, while both phosphatase activity and fine-root density were the greatest in the topsoil (top 5 cm) and dramatically decreased with depth. This suggests that trees depend on the acquisition of P from the labile Po in the topsoil, despite a greater amount of labile P in the subsoil. Trees with a high foliar N/P ratio may invest N to acquire P from the topsoil by secreting phosphatase that consists of proteins, rather than investing C to extending roots to scavenge P in the subsoil.
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pubCambridge University Press
doi10.1017/S0266467410000350
tpages10