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TESTING CHEVERUD'S CONJECTURE FOR BEHAVIORAL CORRELATIONS AND BEHAVIORAL SYNDROMES

Recent research regarding correlations among behaviors—under the labels of behavioral syndromes and animal personalities—has typically assumed that phenotypic correlations between behaviors are representative of underlying genetic correlations. However, for behaviors, the concordance between phenoty... Full description

Journal Title: Evolution 2011, Vol.65 (6), p.1814-1820
Main Author: Dochtermann, Ned A.
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: Malden, USA: Blackwell Publishing Inc
ID: ISSN: 0014-3820
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21644966
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title: TESTING CHEVERUD'S CONJECTURE FOR BEHAVIORAL CORRELATIONS AND BEHAVIORAL SYNDROMES
format: Article
creator:
  • Dochtermann, Ned A.
subjects:
  • Animal behavior
  • Animal personalities
  • Animals
  • Behavior genetics
  • Behavior, Animal
  • behavioral syndrome
  • Biological Evolution
  • BRIEF COMMUNICATIONS
  • Cheverud's conjecture
  • Correlation analysis
  • Correlations
  • Ecological genetics
  • Evolution
  • Evolutionary genetics
  • Genetic correlation
  • Genetic research
  • Genetic Variation
  • Genotype
  • Genotype & phenotype
  • Models, Biological
  • Personality traits
  • Phenotype
  • Phenotypic correlation
  • phenotypic gambit
  • Phenotypic traits
  • Quantitative genetics
ispartof: Evolution, 2011, Vol.65 (6), p.1814-1820
description: Recent research regarding correlations among behaviors—under the labels of behavioral syndromes and animal personalities—has typically assumed that phenotypic correlations between behaviors are representative of underlying genetic correlations. However, for behaviors, the concordance between phenotypic and genetic correlations has not been rigorously examined. I tested this assumption using published estimates and found phenotypic and genetic correlations to be strongly related but found that the average absolute difference between the two was quite high and similar to that observed in other traits. Using absolute differences as the sole criterion, phenotypic correlations do not reliably estimate the magnitude of genetic correlations for behaviors, which is problematic for behavioral syndrome researchers. However, phenotypic correlations explained 75% of the variation in genetic correlations and their sign was typically the same as that of genetic correlations. This suggests that phenotypic correlations between behaviors reliably estimate the direction of underling genetic relationships and provide considerable information regarding the magnitude of genetic correlations. Thus, if researchers are careful about the questions they ask, phenotypic correlations between behaviors can be informative regarding underlying genetic correlations and their evolutionary implications.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0014-3820
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0014-3820
  • 1558-5646
url: Link


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descriptionRecent research regarding correlations among behaviors—under the labels of behavioral syndromes and animal personalities—has typically assumed that phenotypic correlations between behaviors are representative of underlying genetic correlations. However, for behaviors, the concordance between phenotypic and genetic correlations has not been rigorously examined. I tested this assumption using published estimates and found phenotypic and genetic correlations to be strongly related but found that the average absolute difference between the two was quite high and similar to that observed in other traits. Using absolute differences as the sole criterion, phenotypic correlations do not reliably estimate the magnitude of genetic correlations for behaviors, which is problematic for behavioral syndrome researchers. However, phenotypic correlations explained 75% of the variation in genetic correlations and their sign was typically the same as that of genetic correlations. This suggests that phenotypic correlations between behaviors reliably estimate the direction of underling genetic relationships and provide considerable information regarding the magnitude of genetic correlations. Thus, if researchers are careful about the questions they ask, phenotypic correlations between behaviors can be informative regarding underlying genetic correlations and their evolutionary implications.
editionReceived July 23, 2010, Accepted January 21, 2011
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subjectAnimal behavior ; Animal personalities ; Animals ; Behavior genetics ; Behavior, Animal ; behavioral syndrome ; Biological Evolution ; BRIEF COMMUNICATIONS ; Cheverud's conjecture ; Correlation analysis ; Correlations ; Ecological genetics ; Evolution ; Evolutionary genetics ; Genetic correlation ; Genetic research ; Genetic Variation ; Genotype ; Genotype & phenotype ; Models, Biological ; Personality traits ; Phenotype ; Phenotypic correlation ; phenotypic gambit ; Phenotypic traits ; Quantitative genetics
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abstractRecent research regarding correlations among behaviors—under the labels of behavioral syndromes and animal personalities—has typically assumed that phenotypic correlations between behaviors are representative of underlying genetic correlations. However, for behaviors, the concordance between phenotypic and genetic correlations has not been rigorously examined. I tested this assumption using published estimates and found phenotypic and genetic correlations to be strongly related but found that the average absolute difference between the two was quite high and similar to that observed in other traits. Using absolute differences as the sole criterion, phenotypic correlations do not reliably estimate the magnitude of genetic correlations for behaviors, which is problematic for behavioral syndrome researchers. However, phenotypic correlations explained 75% of the variation in genetic correlations and their sign was typically the same as that of genetic correlations. This suggests that phenotypic correlations between behaviors reliably estimate the direction of underling genetic relationships and provide considerable information regarding the magnitude of genetic correlations. Thus, if researchers are careful about the questions they ask, phenotypic correlations between behaviors can be informative regarding underlying genetic correlations and their evolutionary implications.
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editionReceived July 23, 2010, Accepted January 21, 2011
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