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Maternal Thyroid Function during Early Pregnancy and Cognitive Functioning in Early Childhood: The Generation R Study

Context: Thyroid hormones are essential for neurodevelopment from early pregnancy onward. Yet population-based data on the association between maternal thyroid function in early pregnancy and children’s cognitive development are sparse. Objective: Our objective was to study associations of maternal... Full description

Journal Title: The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism 2010, Vol.95 (9), p.4227-4234
Main Author: Henrichs, Jens
Other Authors: Bongers-Schokking, Jacoba J , Schenk, Jacqueline J , Ghassabian, Akhgar , Schmidt, Henk G , Visser, Theo J , Hooijkaas, Herbert , de Muinck Keizer-Schrama, Sabine M. P. F , Hofman, Albert , Jaddoe, Vincent V. W , Visser, Willy , Steegers, Eric A. P , Verhulst, Frank C , de Rijke, Yolanda B , Tiemeier, Henning
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: Bethesda, MD: Endocrine Society
ID: ISSN: 0021-972X
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recordid: cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_877600710
title: Maternal Thyroid Function during Early Pregnancy and Cognitive Functioning in Early Childhood: The Generation R Study
format: Article
creator:
  • Henrichs, Jens
  • Bongers-Schokking, Jacoba J
  • Schenk, Jacqueline J
  • Ghassabian, Akhgar
  • Schmidt, Henk G
  • Visser, Theo J
  • Hooijkaas, Herbert
  • de Muinck Keizer-Schrama, Sabine M. P. F
  • Hofman, Albert
  • Jaddoe, Vincent V. W
  • Visser, Willy
  • Steegers, Eric A. P
  • Verhulst, Frank C
  • de Rijke, Yolanda B
  • Tiemeier, Henning
subjects:
  • Abridged Index Medicus
  • Adult
  • Biological and medical sciences
  • Child
  • Child Development - physiology
  • Cognition - physiology
  • Cohort Studies
  • Developmental Disabilities - blood
  • Developmental Disabilities - etiology
  • Endocrinopathies
  • Family Characteristics
  • Feeding. Feeding behavior
  • Female
  • Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology
  • Humans
  • Hypothyroidism - blood
  • Hypothyroidism - complications
  • Hypothyroidism - physiopathology
  • Maternal-Fetal Relations
  • Medical sciences
  • Mothers
  • Pregnancy
  • Pregnancy Trimester, First - blood
  • Pregnancy Trimester, First - physiology
  • Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - blood
  • Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - physiopathology
  • Risk Factors
  • Thyroid Function Tests
  • Thyroid Gland - physiology
  • Thyrotropin - blood
  • Vertebrates: anatomy and physiology, studies on body, several organs or systems
  • Vertebrates: endocrinology
ispartof: The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, 2010, Vol.95 (9), p.4227-4234
description: Context: Thyroid hormones are essential for neurodevelopment from early pregnancy onward. Yet population-based data on the association between maternal thyroid function in early pregnancy and children’s cognitive development are sparse. Objective: Our objective was to study associations of maternal hypothyroxinemia and of early pregnancy maternal TSH and free T4 (FT4) levels across the entire range with cognitive functioning in early childhood. Design and Setting: We conducted a population-based cohort in The Netherlands. Participants: Participants included 3659 children and their mothers. Main Measures: In pregnant women with normal TSH levels at 13 wk gestation (sd = 1.7), mild and severe maternal hypothyroxinemia were defined as FT4 concentrations below the 10th and 5th percentile, respectively. Children’s expressive vocabulary at 18 months was reported by mothers using the MacArthur Communicative Development Inventory. At 30 months, mothers completed the Language Development Survey and the Parent Report of Children’s Abilities measuring verbal and nonverbal cognitive functioning. Results: Maternal TSH was not related to the cognitive outcomes. An increase in maternal FT4 predicted a lower risk of expressive language delay at 30 months only. However, both mild and severe maternal hypothyroxinemia was associated with a higher risk of expressive language delay across all ages [odds ratio (OR) = 1.44; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.09–1.91; P = 0.010 and OR = 1.80; 95% CI = 1.24–2.61; P = 0.002, respectively]. Severe maternal hypothyroxinemia also predicted a higher risk of nonverbal cognitive delay (OR = 2.03; 95% CI = 1.22–3.39; P = 0.007). Conclusions: Maternal hypothyroxinemia is a risk factor for cognitive delay in early childhood. Maternal hypothyroxinemia during early pregnancy is a determinant of verbal and nonverbal cognitive functioning in early childhood.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0021-972X
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0021-972X
  • 1945-7197
url: Link


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titleMaternal Thyroid Function during Early Pregnancy and Cognitive Functioning in Early Childhood: The Generation R Study
creatorHenrichs, Jens ; Bongers-Schokking, Jacoba J ; Schenk, Jacqueline J ; Ghassabian, Akhgar ; Schmidt, Henk G ; Visser, Theo J ; Hooijkaas, Herbert ; de Muinck Keizer-Schrama, Sabine M. P. F ; Hofman, Albert ; Jaddoe, Vincent V. W ; Visser, Willy ; Steegers, Eric A. P ; Verhulst, Frank C ; de Rijke, Yolanda B ; Tiemeier, Henning
creatorcontribHenrichs, Jens ; Bongers-Schokking, Jacoba J ; Schenk, Jacqueline J ; Ghassabian, Akhgar ; Schmidt, Henk G ; Visser, Theo J ; Hooijkaas, Herbert ; de Muinck Keizer-Schrama, Sabine M. P. F ; Hofman, Albert ; Jaddoe, Vincent V. W ; Visser, Willy ; Steegers, Eric A. P ; Verhulst, Frank C ; de Rijke, Yolanda B ; Tiemeier, Henning
descriptionContext: Thyroid hormones are essential for neurodevelopment from early pregnancy onward. Yet population-based data on the association between maternal thyroid function in early pregnancy and children’s cognitive development are sparse. Objective: Our objective was to study associations of maternal hypothyroxinemia and of early pregnancy maternal TSH and free T4 (FT4) levels across the entire range with cognitive functioning in early childhood. Design and Setting: We conducted a population-based cohort in The Netherlands. Participants: Participants included 3659 children and their mothers. Main Measures: In pregnant women with normal TSH levels at 13 wk gestation (sd = 1.7), mild and severe maternal hypothyroxinemia were defined as FT4 concentrations below the 10th and 5th percentile, respectively. Children’s expressive vocabulary at 18 months was reported by mothers using the MacArthur Communicative Development Inventory. At 30 months, mothers completed the Language Development Survey and the Parent Report of Children’s Abilities measuring verbal and nonverbal cognitive functioning. Results: Maternal TSH was not related to the cognitive outcomes. An increase in maternal FT4 predicted a lower risk of expressive language delay at 30 months only. However, both mild and severe maternal hypothyroxinemia was associated with a higher risk of expressive language delay across all ages [odds ratio (OR) = 1.44; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.09–1.91; P = 0.010 and OR = 1.80; 95% CI = 1.24–2.61; P = 0.002, respectively]. Severe maternal hypothyroxinemia also predicted a higher risk of nonverbal cognitive delay (OR = 2.03; 95% CI = 1.22–3.39; P = 0.007). Conclusions: Maternal hypothyroxinemia is a risk factor for cognitive delay in early childhood. Maternal hypothyroxinemia during early pregnancy is a determinant of verbal and nonverbal cognitive functioning in early childhood.
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languageeng
publisherBethesda, MD: Endocrine Society
subjectAbridged Index Medicus ; Adult ; Biological and medical sciences ; Child ; Child Development - physiology ; Cognition - physiology ; Cohort Studies ; Developmental Disabilities - blood ; Developmental Disabilities - etiology ; Endocrinopathies ; Family Characteristics ; Feeding. Feeding behavior ; Female ; Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology ; Humans ; Hypothyroidism - blood ; Hypothyroidism - complications ; Hypothyroidism - physiopathology ; Maternal-Fetal Relations ; Medical sciences ; Mothers ; Pregnancy ; Pregnancy Trimester, First - blood ; Pregnancy Trimester, First - physiology ; Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - blood ; Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - physiopathology ; Risk Factors ; Thyroid Function Tests ; Thyroid Gland - physiology ; Thyrotropin - blood ; Vertebrates: anatomy and physiology, studies on body, several organs or systems ; Vertebrates: endocrinology
ispartofThe Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, 2010, Vol.95 (9), p.4227-4234
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0Henrichs, Jens
1Bongers-Schokking, Jacoba J
2Schenk, Jacqueline J
3Ghassabian, Akhgar
4Schmidt, Henk G
5Visser, Theo J
6Hooijkaas, Herbert
7de Muinck Keizer-Schrama, Sabine M. P. F
8Hofman, Albert
9Jaddoe, Vincent V. W
10Visser, Willy
11Steegers, Eric A. P
12Verhulst, Frank C
13de Rijke, Yolanda B
14Tiemeier, Henning
title
0Maternal Thyroid Function during Early Pregnancy and Cognitive Functioning in Early Childhood: The Generation R Study
1The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism
addtitleJ Clin Endocrinol Metab
descriptionContext: Thyroid hormones are essential for neurodevelopment from early pregnancy onward. Yet population-based data on the association between maternal thyroid function in early pregnancy and children’s cognitive development are sparse. Objective: Our objective was to study associations of maternal hypothyroxinemia and of early pregnancy maternal TSH and free T4 (FT4) levels across the entire range with cognitive functioning in early childhood. Design and Setting: We conducted a population-based cohort in The Netherlands. Participants: Participants included 3659 children and their mothers. Main Measures: In pregnant women with normal TSH levels at 13 wk gestation (sd = 1.7), mild and severe maternal hypothyroxinemia were defined as FT4 concentrations below the 10th and 5th percentile, respectively. Children’s expressive vocabulary at 18 months was reported by mothers using the MacArthur Communicative Development Inventory. At 30 months, mothers completed the Language Development Survey and the Parent Report of Children’s Abilities measuring verbal and nonverbal cognitive functioning. Results: Maternal TSH was not related to the cognitive outcomes. An increase in maternal FT4 predicted a lower risk of expressive language delay at 30 months only. However, both mild and severe maternal hypothyroxinemia was associated with a higher risk of expressive language delay across all ages [odds ratio (OR) = 1.44; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.09–1.91; P = 0.010 and OR = 1.80; 95% CI = 1.24–2.61; P = 0.002, respectively]. Severe maternal hypothyroxinemia also predicted a higher risk of nonverbal cognitive delay (OR = 2.03; 95% CI = 1.22–3.39; P = 0.007). Conclusions: Maternal hypothyroxinemia is a risk factor for cognitive delay in early childhood. Maternal hypothyroxinemia during early pregnancy is a determinant of verbal and nonverbal cognitive functioning in early childhood.
subject
0Abridged Index Medicus
1Adult
2Biological and medical sciences
3Child
4Child Development - physiology
5Cognition - physiology
6Cohort Studies
7Developmental Disabilities - blood
8Developmental Disabilities - etiology
9Endocrinopathies
10Family Characteristics
11Feeding. Feeding behavior
12Female
13Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology
14Humans
15Hypothyroidism - blood
16Hypothyroidism - complications
17Hypothyroidism - physiopathology
18Maternal-Fetal Relations
19Medical sciences
20Mothers
21Pregnancy
22Pregnancy Trimester, First - blood
23Pregnancy Trimester, First - physiology
24Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - blood
25Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - physiopathology
26Risk Factors
27Thyroid Function Tests
28Thyroid Gland - physiology
29Thyrotropin - blood
30Vertebrates: anatomy and physiology, studies on body, several organs or systems
31Vertebrates: endocrinology
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6Hooijkaas, Herbert
7de Muinck Keizer-Schrama, Sabine M. P. F
8Hofman, Albert
9Jaddoe, Vincent V. W
10Visser, Willy
11Steegers, Eric A. P
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titleMaternal Thyroid Function during Early Pregnancy and Cognitive Functioning in Early Childhood: The Generation R Study
authorHenrichs, Jens ; Bongers-Schokking, Jacoba J ; Schenk, Jacqueline J ; Ghassabian, Akhgar ; Schmidt, Henk G ; Visser, Theo J ; Hooijkaas, Herbert ; de Muinck Keizer-Schrama, Sabine M. P. F ; Hofman, Albert ; Jaddoe, Vincent V. W ; Visser, Willy ; Steegers, Eric A. P ; Verhulst, Frank C ; de Rijke, Yolanda B ; Tiemeier, Henning
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1Adult
2Biological and medical sciences
3Child
4Child Development - physiology
5Cognition - physiology
6Cohort Studies
7Developmental Disabilities - blood
8Developmental Disabilities - etiology
9Endocrinopathies
10Family Characteristics
11Feeding. Feeding behavior
12Female
13Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology
14Humans
15Hypothyroidism - blood
16Hypothyroidism - complications
17Hypothyroidism - physiopathology
18Maternal-Fetal Relations
19Medical sciences
20Mothers
21Pregnancy
22Pregnancy Trimester, First - blood
23Pregnancy Trimester, First - physiology
24Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - blood
25Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - physiopathology
26Risk Factors
27Thyroid Function Tests
28Thyroid Gland - physiology
29Thyrotropin - blood
30Vertebrates: anatomy and physiology, studies on body, several organs or systems
31Vertebrates: endocrinology
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1Bongers-Schokking, Jacoba J
2Schenk, Jacqueline J
3Ghassabian, Akhgar
4Schmidt, Henk G
5Visser, Theo J
6Hooijkaas, Herbert
7de Muinck Keizer-Schrama, Sabine M. P. F
8Hofman, Albert
9Jaddoe, Vincent V. W
10Visser, Willy
11Steegers, Eric A. P
12Verhulst, Frank C
13de Rijke, Yolanda B
14Tiemeier, Henning
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1Bongers-Schokking, Jacoba J
2Schenk, Jacqueline J
3Ghassabian, Akhgar
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5Visser, Theo J
6Hooijkaas, Herbert
7de Muinck Keizer-Schrama, Sabine M. P. F
8Hofman, Albert
9Jaddoe, Vincent V. W
10Visser, Willy
11Steegers, Eric A. P
12Verhulst, Frank C
13de Rijke, Yolanda B
14Tiemeier, Henning
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jtitleThe Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism
addtitleJ Clin Endocrinol Metab
date2010-09
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volume95
issue9
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pages4227-4234
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abstractContext: Thyroid hormones are essential for neurodevelopment from early pregnancy onward. Yet population-based data on the association between maternal thyroid function in early pregnancy and children’s cognitive development are sparse. Objective: Our objective was to study associations of maternal hypothyroxinemia and of early pregnancy maternal TSH and free T4 (FT4) levels across the entire range with cognitive functioning in early childhood. Design and Setting: We conducted a population-based cohort in The Netherlands. Participants: Participants included 3659 children and their mothers. Main Measures: In pregnant women with normal TSH levels at 13 wk gestation (sd = 1.7), mild and severe maternal hypothyroxinemia were defined as FT4 concentrations below the 10th and 5th percentile, respectively. Children’s expressive vocabulary at 18 months was reported by mothers using the MacArthur Communicative Development Inventory. At 30 months, mothers completed the Language Development Survey and the Parent Report of Children’s Abilities measuring verbal and nonverbal cognitive functioning. Results: Maternal TSH was not related to the cognitive outcomes. An increase in maternal FT4 predicted a lower risk of expressive language delay at 30 months only. However, both mild and severe maternal hypothyroxinemia was associated with a higher risk of expressive language delay across all ages [odds ratio (OR) = 1.44; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.09–1.91; P = 0.010 and OR = 1.80; 95% CI = 1.24–2.61; P = 0.002, respectively]. Severe maternal hypothyroxinemia also predicted a higher risk of nonverbal cognitive delay (OR = 2.03; 95% CI = 1.22–3.39; P = 0.007). Conclusions: Maternal hypothyroxinemia is a risk factor for cognitive delay in early childhood. Maternal hypothyroxinemia during early pregnancy is a determinant of verbal and nonverbal cognitive functioning in early childhood.
copBethesda, MD
pubEndocrine Society
pmid20534757
doi10.1210/jc.2010-0415
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