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Impacts of soil fertility on species and phylogenetic turnover in the high - rainfall zone of the Southwest Australian global biodiversity hotspot

The ancient landscape of the South - West Australian Floristic Region (SWAFR) is characterized by exceptional floristic diversity, attributed to a complex mosaic of nutrient - impoverished soils. Between - soil type differences in nutrient availability are expected to affect floristic assemblage pat... Full description

Journal Title: Plant and soil 2011, Vol.345 (1/2), p.103-124
Main Author: Sander, Juliane
Other Authors: Wardell-Johnson, Grant
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: Dordrecht: Springer
ID: ISSN: 0032-079X
Link: http://pascal-francis.inist.fr/vibad/index.php?action=getRecordDetail&idt=24425588
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recordid: cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_883019483
title: Impacts of soil fertility on species and phylogenetic turnover in the high - rainfall zone of the Southwest Australian global biodiversity hotspot
format: Article
creator:
  • Sander, Juliane
  • Wardell-Johnson, Grant
subjects:
  • Agronomy. Soil science and plant productions
  • Analysis
  • Animal, plant and microbial ecology
  • Biodiversity
  • Biological and medical sciences
  • Biological diversity
  • Biological taxonomies
  • Biomedical and Life Sciences
  • Climate
  • Climatic changes
  • Conservation
  • Dispersion
  • Ecology
  • Environmental factors
  • Fertility
  • Forest soils
  • Forests
  • Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology
  • General agronomy. Plant production
  • Habitat
  • Hot spots
  • Landscape
  • Life Sciences
  • Mosaics
  • Nutrient availability
  • Nutrients
  • Phylogenetics
  • Phylogeny
  • Plant ecology
  • Plant Physiology
  • Plant Sciences
  • Plants
  • Rain and rainfall
  • Rainfall
  • Regular Article
  • Soil
  • Soil chemistry
  • Soil density
  • Soil fertility
  • Soil microorganisms
  • Soil nutrients
  • Soil plant interactions
  • Soil salts
  • Soil science
  • Soil Science & Conservation
  • Soil texture
  • Soil types
  • Soil-plant relationships. Soil fertility
  • Soil-plant relationships. Soil fertility. Fertilization. Amendments
  • Species diversity
ispartof: Plant and soil, 2011, Vol.345 (1/2), p.103-124
description: The ancient landscape of the South - West Australian Floristic Region (SWAFR) is characterized by exceptional floristic diversity, attributed to a complex mosaic of nutrient - impoverished soils. Between - soil type differences in nutrient availability are expected to affect floristic assemblage patterns in the SWAFR. We compared patterns of floristic diversity between open - forest samples from three soil types in the high - rainfall zone of the SWAFR. The importance of environmental and spatial factors for species compositional turnover within soil types were evaluated within canonical correspondence analyses using variation partitioning. Patterns of phylogenetic diversity and dispersion were contrasted between soil types and related to differences in soil nutrient availability. Between - quadrat shared phylogenetic branch length for individual life form categories was correlated with explanatory variables using Mantel tests. Species and phylogenetic diversity increased with a decline in soil nutrients and basal area. Nutrient - poorer soils were differentiated by higher species density and phylogenetic diversity, and larger phylogenetic distances between species. Species turnover was best explained by environmental factors when soil nutrient concentrations and basal area were low. Coastal and inland quadrats from the most fertile soil type were distinguished by significantly differing patterns of phylogenetic diversity. Inland quadrats were characterized by strong relationships between phylogenetic diversity and environment, while phylogenetic patterns remained largely unaccounted for by explanatory variables within coastal quadrats. Phylogenetic diversity was more strongly related with environment within upland landform types for nutrient-poor soils. We highlight the complex relationships between climatic and edaphic factors within the SWAFR, and propose that the occurrence of refugial habitat for plant phylogenetic diversity is dynamically linked with these interactions. Climate change susceptibility was estimated to be especially high for inland locations within the high rainfall zone. Despite the strong relationship between floristic diversity and soil fertility, holistic conservation approaches are required to conserve the mosaic of soil types regardless of soil nutrient status.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0032-079X
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0032-079X
  • 1573-5036
url: Link


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descriptionThe ancient landscape of the South - West Australian Floristic Region (SWAFR) is characterized by exceptional floristic diversity, attributed to a complex mosaic of nutrient - impoverished soils. Between - soil type differences in nutrient availability are expected to affect floristic assemblage patterns in the SWAFR. We compared patterns of floristic diversity between open - forest samples from three soil types in the high - rainfall zone of the SWAFR. The importance of environmental and spatial factors for species compositional turnover within soil types were evaluated within canonical correspondence analyses using variation partitioning. Patterns of phylogenetic diversity and dispersion were contrasted between soil types and related to differences in soil nutrient availability. Between - quadrat shared phylogenetic branch length for individual life form categories was correlated with explanatory variables using Mantel tests. Species and phylogenetic diversity increased with a decline in soil nutrients and basal area. Nutrient - poorer soils were differentiated by higher species density and phylogenetic diversity, and larger phylogenetic distances between species. Species turnover was best explained by environmental factors when soil nutrient concentrations and basal area were low. Coastal and inland quadrats from the most fertile soil type were distinguished by significantly differing patterns of phylogenetic diversity. Inland quadrats were characterized by strong relationships between phylogenetic diversity and environment, while phylogenetic patterns remained largely unaccounted for by explanatory variables within coastal quadrats. Phylogenetic diversity was more strongly related with environment within upland landform types for nutrient-poor soils. We highlight the complex relationships between climatic and edaphic factors within the SWAFR, and propose that the occurrence of refugial habitat for plant phylogenetic diversity is dynamically linked with these interactions. Climate change susceptibility was estimated to be especially high for inland locations within the high rainfall zone. Despite the strong relationship between floristic diversity and soil fertility, holistic conservation approaches are required to conserve the mosaic of soil types regardless of soil nutrient status.
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subjectAgronomy. Soil science and plant productions ; Analysis ; Animal, plant and microbial ecology ; Biodiversity ; Biological and medical sciences ; Biological diversity ; Biological taxonomies ; Biomedical and Life Sciences ; Climate ; Climatic changes ; Conservation ; Dispersion ; Ecology ; Environmental factors ; Fertility ; Forest soils ; Forests ; Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology ; General agronomy. Plant production ; Habitat ; Hot spots ; Landscape ; Life Sciences ; Mosaics ; Nutrient availability ; Nutrients ; Phylogenetics ; Phylogeny ; Plant ecology ; Plant Physiology ; Plant Sciences ; Plants ; Rain and rainfall ; Rainfall ; Regular Article ; Soil ; Soil chemistry ; Soil density ; Soil fertility ; Soil microorganisms ; Soil nutrients ; Soil plant interactions ; Soil salts ; Soil science ; Soil Science & Conservation ; Soil texture ; Soil types ; Soil-plant relationships. Soil fertility ; Soil-plant relationships. Soil fertility. Fertilization. Amendments ; Species diversity
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descriptionThe ancient landscape of the South - West Australian Floristic Region (SWAFR) is characterized by exceptional floristic diversity, attributed to a complex mosaic of nutrient - impoverished soils. Between - soil type differences in nutrient availability are expected to affect floristic assemblage patterns in the SWAFR. We compared patterns of floristic diversity between open - forest samples from three soil types in the high - rainfall zone of the SWAFR. The importance of environmental and spatial factors for species compositional turnover within soil types were evaluated within canonical correspondence analyses using variation partitioning. Patterns of phylogenetic diversity and dispersion were contrasted between soil types and related to differences in soil nutrient availability. Between - quadrat shared phylogenetic branch length for individual life form categories was correlated with explanatory variables using Mantel tests. Species and phylogenetic diversity increased with a decline in soil nutrients and basal area. Nutrient - poorer soils were differentiated by higher species density and phylogenetic diversity, and larger phylogenetic distances between species. Species turnover was best explained by environmental factors when soil nutrient concentrations and basal area were low. Coastal and inland quadrats from the most fertile soil type were distinguished by significantly differing patterns of phylogenetic diversity. Inland quadrats were characterized by strong relationships between phylogenetic diversity and environment, while phylogenetic patterns remained largely unaccounted for by explanatory variables within coastal quadrats. Phylogenetic diversity was more strongly related with environment within upland landform types for nutrient-poor soils. We highlight the complex relationships between climatic and edaphic factors within the SWAFR, and propose that the occurrence of refugial habitat for plant phylogenetic diversity is dynamically linked with these interactions. Climate change susceptibility was estimated to be especially high for inland locations within the high rainfall zone. Despite the strong relationship between floristic diversity and soil fertility, holistic conservation approaches are required to conserve the mosaic of soil types regardless of soil nutrient status.
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abstractThe ancient landscape of the South - West Australian Floristic Region (SWAFR) is characterized by exceptional floristic diversity, attributed to a complex mosaic of nutrient - impoverished soils. Between - soil type differences in nutrient availability are expected to affect floristic assemblage patterns in the SWAFR. We compared patterns of floristic diversity between open - forest samples from three soil types in the high - rainfall zone of the SWAFR. The importance of environmental and spatial factors for species compositional turnover within soil types were evaluated within canonical correspondence analyses using variation partitioning. Patterns of phylogenetic diversity and dispersion were contrasted between soil types and related to differences in soil nutrient availability. Between - quadrat shared phylogenetic branch length for individual life form categories was correlated with explanatory variables using Mantel tests. Species and phylogenetic diversity increased with a decline in soil nutrients and basal area. Nutrient - poorer soils were differentiated by higher species density and phylogenetic diversity, and larger phylogenetic distances between species. Species turnover was best explained by environmental factors when soil nutrient concentrations and basal area were low. Coastal and inland quadrats from the most fertile soil type were distinguished by significantly differing patterns of phylogenetic diversity. Inland quadrats were characterized by strong relationships between phylogenetic diversity and environment, while phylogenetic patterns remained largely unaccounted for by explanatory variables within coastal quadrats. Phylogenetic diversity was more strongly related with environment within upland landform types for nutrient-poor soils. We highlight the complex relationships between climatic and edaphic factors within the SWAFR, and propose that the occurrence of refugial habitat for plant phylogenetic diversity is dynamically linked with these interactions. Climate change susceptibility was estimated to be especially high for inland locations within the high rainfall zone. Despite the strong relationship between floristic diversity and soil fertility, holistic conservation approaches are required to conserve the mosaic of soil types regardless of soil nutrient status.
copDordrecht
pubSpringer
doi10.1007/s11104-011-0763-5