schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

Factors associated with uptake of vaccination against pandemic influenza: A systematic review

Abstract Background In June 2009 a global influenza pandemic was declared by the World Health Organisation. A vaccination programme against H1N1 influenza was introduced in many countries from September 2009, but there was low uptake in both the general population and health professionals in many, t... Full description

Journal Title: Vaccine 2011, Vol.29 (38), p.6472-6484
Main Author: Bish, Alison
Other Authors: Yardley, Lucy , Nicoll, Angus , Michie, Susan
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: Kidlington: Elsevier Ltd
ID: ISSN: 0264-410X
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_888116403
title: Factors associated with uptake of vaccination against pandemic influenza: A systematic review
format: Article
creator:
  • Bish, Alison
  • Yardley, Lucy
  • Nicoll, Angus
  • Michie, Susan
subjects:
  • Allergy and Immunology
  • Applied microbiology
  • Biological and medical sciences
  • Epidemics
  • Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology
  • H1N1
  • Humans
  • Immunization
  • Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - immunology
  • Influenza Vaccines - administration & dosage
  • Influenza Vaccines - immunology
  • Influenza, Human - prevention & control
  • Influenza, Human - virology
  • Microbiology
  • Pandemic
  • Pandemics - prevention & control
  • Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
  • Psychological factors
  • Public health
  • Swine flu
  • Swine influenza
  • Vaccination
  • Vaccination - utilization
  • Vaccines
  • Vaccines, antisera, therapeutical immunoglobulins and monoclonal antibodies (general aspects)
  • Womens health
ispartof: Vaccine, 2011, Vol.29 (38), p.6472-6484
description: Abstract Background In June 2009 a global influenza pandemic was declared by the World Health Organisation. A vaccination programme against H1N1 influenza was introduced in many countries from September 2009, but there was low uptake in both the general population and health professionals in many, though not all, countries. Purpose To examine the psychological and demographic factors associated with uptake of vaccination during the 2009 pandemic. Method A systematic literature review searching Web of Science and PubMed databases up to 24 January 2011. Results 37 articles met the study inclusion criteria. Using the framework of Protection Motivation Theory the review found that both the degree of threat experienced in the 2009 pandemic influenza outbreak and perceptions of vaccination as an effective coping strategy were associated with stronger intentions and higher uptake of vaccination. Appraisal of threat resulted from both believing oneself to be at risk from developing H1N1 influenza and concern and worry about the disease. Appraisal of coping resulted from concerns about the safety of the vaccine and its side effects. There was evidence of an influence of social pressure in that people who thought that others wanted them to be vaccinated were more likely to do so and people getting their information about vaccination from official health sources being more likely to be vaccinated than those relying on unofficial sources. There was also a strong influence of past behaviour, with those having been vaccinated in the past against seasonal influenza being more likely to be vaccinated against pandemic influenza. Demographic factors associated with higher intentions and uptake of vaccination were: older age, male gender, being from an ethnic minority and, for health professionals, being a doctor. Discussion Interventions designed to increase vaccination rates could be developed and implemented in advance of a pandemic. Strategies to improve uptake of vaccination include interventions which highlight the risk posed by pandemic influenza while simultaneously offering tactics to ameliorate this risk (e.g. vaccination). Perceived concerns about vaccination can be tackled by reducing the omission bias (a perception that harm caused by action is worse than harm caused by inaction). In addition, interventions to increase seasonal influenza vaccination in advance of a future pandemic may be an effective strategy.
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 0264-410X
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0264-410X
  • 1873-2518
url: Link


@attributes
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
RANK2.7418337
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourceidgale_proqu
recordidTN_cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_888116403
sourceformatXML
sourcesystemPC
galeidA264224033
sourcerecordidA264224033
originalsourceidFETCH-LOGICAL-c538t-297a7ce8f906f8ddcc88b1ad45a0bd8a77d7aee2e38b027909bd437fe73391ed3
addsrcrecordideNqNkl9rFDEUxQdRbK1-BCUg4tOu-TMzySgoS7EqFHxQwRcJd5M7NdvZZE0yLeunN9NdLexLZR4GLr9zcnJPquopo3NGWftqNb8CY5zHOaeMzWlbxvJedcyUFDPeMHW_Oqa8rWc1o9-PqkcprSiljWDdw-qIM9m0XUuPqx9nYHKIiUBKwTjIaMm1yz_JuMlwiST0ZHcOZBc8gQtwPmWyAW9x7Qxxvh9G9L_hNVmQtE0Z14U0JOKVw-vH1YMehoRP9v-T6tvZ-6-nH2fnnz98Ol2cz0wjVJ7xToI0qPqOtr2y1hillgxs3QBdWgVSWgmIHIVaUi472i1tLWSPUoiOoRUn1cud7yaGXyOmrNcuGRwG8BjGpJVSjLU1Ff9B1owLwdpCPj8gV2GMvlxDs7pTjLa1YIWa76gLGFCXbYQcwZTvZj3BY-_KfFGK4Hw6vwiancDEkFLEXm-iW0Pcakb11Kxe6X2zempW07aMZdE928cZl2u0_1R_qyzAiz0AycDQR_DGpVuuriXv-GT05iCAcfmm3ZLcDXfGeLdTY6mzVBx1Mg69QesimqxtcHc6vD1wMIPzrkS-xC2m2yXrxDXVX6ZHPL1hVjwpLeX8Aeh57NU
sourcetypeAggregation Database
isCDItrue
recordtypearticle
pqid1498106431
display
typearticle
titleFactors associated with uptake of vaccination against pandemic influenza: A systematic review
sourceAlma/SFX Local Collection
creatorBish, Alison ; Yardley, Lucy ; Nicoll, Angus ; Michie, Susan
creatorcontribBish, Alison ; Yardley, Lucy ; Nicoll, Angus ; Michie, Susan
descriptionAbstract Background In June 2009 a global influenza pandemic was declared by the World Health Organisation. A vaccination programme against H1N1 influenza was introduced in many countries from September 2009, but there was low uptake in both the general population and health professionals in many, though not all, countries. Purpose To examine the psychological and demographic factors associated with uptake of vaccination during the 2009 pandemic. Method A systematic literature review searching Web of Science and PubMed databases up to 24 January 2011. Results 37 articles met the study inclusion criteria. Using the framework of Protection Motivation Theory the review found that both the degree of threat experienced in the 2009 pandemic influenza outbreak and perceptions of vaccination as an effective coping strategy were associated with stronger intentions and higher uptake of vaccination. Appraisal of threat resulted from both believing oneself to be at risk from developing H1N1 influenza and concern and worry about the disease. Appraisal of coping resulted from concerns about the safety of the vaccine and its side effects. There was evidence of an influence of social pressure in that people who thought that others wanted them to be vaccinated were more likely to do so and people getting their information about vaccination from official health sources being more likely to be vaccinated than those relying on unofficial sources. There was also a strong influence of past behaviour, with those having been vaccinated in the past against seasonal influenza being more likely to be vaccinated against pandemic influenza. Demographic factors associated with higher intentions and uptake of vaccination were: older age, male gender, being from an ethnic minority and, for health professionals, being a doctor. Discussion Interventions designed to increase vaccination rates could be developed and implemented in advance of a pandemic. Strategies to improve uptake of vaccination include interventions which highlight the risk posed by pandemic influenza while simultaneously offering tactics to ameliorate this risk (e.g. vaccination). Perceived concerns about vaccination can be tackled by reducing the omission bias (a perception that harm caused by action is worse than harm caused by inaction). In addition, interventions to increase seasonal influenza vaccination in advance of a future pandemic may be an effective strategy.
identifier
0ISSN: 0264-410X
1EISSN: 1873-2518
2DOI: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2011.06.107
3PMID: 21756960
4CODEN: VACCDE
languageeng
publisherKidlington: Elsevier Ltd
subjectAllergy and Immunology ; Applied microbiology ; Biological and medical sciences ; Epidemics ; Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology ; H1N1 ; Humans ; Immunization ; Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - immunology ; Influenza Vaccines - administration & dosage ; Influenza Vaccines - immunology ; Influenza, Human - prevention & control ; Influenza, Human - virology ; Microbiology ; Pandemic ; Pandemics - prevention & control ; Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data ; Psychological factors ; Public health ; Swine flu ; Swine influenza ; Vaccination ; Vaccination - utilization ; Vaccines ; Vaccines, antisera, therapeutical immunoglobulins and monoclonal antibodies (general aspects) ; Womens health
ispartofVaccine, 2011, Vol.29 (38), p.6472-6484
rights
0Elsevier Ltd
12011 Elsevier Ltd
22015 INIST-CNRS
3Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
4COPYRIGHT 2011 Elsevier B.V.
5Copyright Elsevier Limited Sep 2, 2011
lds50peer_reviewed
citedbyFETCH-LOGICAL-c538t-297a7ce8f906f8ddcc88b1ad45a0bd8a77d7aee2e38b027909bd437fe73391ed3
citesFETCH-LOGICAL-c538t-297a7ce8f906f8ddcc88b1ad45a0bd8a77d7aee2e38b027909bd437fe73391ed3
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
openurlfulltext$$Topenurlfull_article
thumbnail$$Usyndetics_thumb_exl
backlink
0$$Uhttp://pascal-francis.inist.fr/vibad/index.php?action=getRecordDetail&idt=24472927$$DView record in Pascal Francis
1$$Uhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21756960$$D View this record in MEDLINE/PubMed
search
creatorcontrib
0Bish, Alison
1Yardley, Lucy
2Nicoll, Angus
3Michie, Susan
title
0Factors associated with uptake of vaccination against pandemic influenza: A systematic review
1Vaccine
addtitleVaccine
descriptionAbstract Background In June 2009 a global influenza pandemic was declared by the World Health Organisation. A vaccination programme against H1N1 influenza was introduced in many countries from September 2009, but there was low uptake in both the general population and health professionals in many, though not all, countries. Purpose To examine the psychological and demographic factors associated with uptake of vaccination during the 2009 pandemic. Method A systematic literature review searching Web of Science and PubMed databases up to 24 January 2011. Results 37 articles met the study inclusion criteria. Using the framework of Protection Motivation Theory the review found that both the degree of threat experienced in the 2009 pandemic influenza outbreak and perceptions of vaccination as an effective coping strategy were associated with stronger intentions and higher uptake of vaccination. Appraisal of threat resulted from both believing oneself to be at risk from developing H1N1 influenza and concern and worry about the disease. Appraisal of coping resulted from concerns about the safety of the vaccine and its side effects. There was evidence of an influence of social pressure in that people who thought that others wanted them to be vaccinated were more likely to do so and people getting their information about vaccination from official health sources being more likely to be vaccinated than those relying on unofficial sources. There was also a strong influence of past behaviour, with those having been vaccinated in the past against seasonal influenza being more likely to be vaccinated against pandemic influenza. Demographic factors associated with higher intentions and uptake of vaccination were: older age, male gender, being from an ethnic minority and, for health professionals, being a doctor. Discussion Interventions designed to increase vaccination rates could be developed and implemented in advance of a pandemic. Strategies to improve uptake of vaccination include interventions which highlight the risk posed by pandemic influenza while simultaneously offering tactics to ameliorate this risk (e.g. vaccination). Perceived concerns about vaccination can be tackled by reducing the omission bias (a perception that harm caused by action is worse than harm caused by inaction). In addition, interventions to increase seasonal influenza vaccination in advance of a future pandemic may be an effective strategy.
subject
0Allergy and Immunology
1Applied microbiology
2Biological and medical sciences
3Epidemics
4Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology
5H1N1
6Humans
7Immunization
8Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - immunology
9Influenza Vaccines - administration & dosage
10Influenza Vaccines - immunology
11Influenza, Human - prevention & control
12Influenza, Human - virology
13Microbiology
14Pandemic
15Pandemics - prevention & control
16Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
17Psychological factors
18Public health
19Swine flu
20Swine influenza
21Vaccination
22Vaccination - utilization
23Vaccines
24Vaccines, antisera, therapeutical immunoglobulins and monoclonal antibodies (general aspects)
25Womens health
issn
00264-410X
11873-2518
fulltexttrue
rsrctypearticle
creationdate2011
recordtypearticle
recordideNqNkl9rFDEUxQdRbK1-BCUg4tOu-TMzySgoS7EqFHxQwRcJd5M7NdvZZE0yLeunN9NdLexLZR4GLr9zcnJPquopo3NGWftqNb8CY5zHOaeMzWlbxvJedcyUFDPeMHW_Oqa8rWc1o9-PqkcprSiljWDdw-qIM9m0XUuPqx9nYHKIiUBKwTjIaMm1yz_JuMlwiST0ZHcOZBc8gQtwPmWyAW9x7Qxxvh9G9L_hNVmQtE0Z14U0JOKVw-vH1YMehoRP9v-T6tvZ-6-nH2fnnz98Ol2cz0wjVJ7xToI0qPqOtr2y1hillgxs3QBdWgVSWgmIHIVaUi472i1tLWSPUoiOoRUn1cud7yaGXyOmrNcuGRwG8BjGpJVSjLU1Ff9B1owLwdpCPj8gV2GMvlxDs7pTjLa1YIWa76gLGFCXbYQcwZTvZj3BY-_KfFGK4Hw6vwiancDEkFLEXm-iW0Pcakb11Kxe6X2zempW07aMZdE928cZl2u0_1R_qyzAiz0AycDQR_DGpVuuriXv-GT05iCAcfmm3ZLcDXfGeLdTY6mzVBx1Mg69QesimqxtcHc6vD1wMIPzrkS-xC2m2yXrxDXVX6ZHPL1hVjwpLeX8Aeh57NU
startdate2011
enddate2011
creator
0Bish, Alison
1Yardley, Lucy
2Nicoll, Angus
3Michie, Susan
general
0Elsevier Ltd
1Elsevier
2Elsevier B.V
3Elsevier Limited
scope
0IQODW
1CGR
2CUY
3CVF
4ECM
5EIF
6NPM
7AAYXX
8CITATION
9BSHEE
103V.
117QL
127RV
137T2
147T5
157U9
167X7
177XB
1888C
1988E
208AO
218C1
228FE
238FH
248FI
258FJ
268FK
278G5
28ABUWG
29AZQEC
30BBNVY
31BENPR
32BHPHI
33C1K
34DWQXO
35FYUFA
36GHDGH
37GNUQQ
38GUQSH
39H94
40HCIFZ
41K9-
42K9.
43KB0
44LK8
45M0R
46M0S
47M0T
48M1P
49M2O
50M7N
51M7P
52MBDVC
53NAPCQ
54PQEST
55PQQKQ
56PQUKI
57Q9U
587X8
sort
creationdate2011
titleFactors associated with uptake of vaccination against pandemic influenza: A systematic review
authorBish, Alison ; Yardley, Lucy ; Nicoll, Angus ; Michie, Susan
facets
frbrtype5
frbrgroupidcdi_FETCH-LOGICAL-c538t-297a7ce8f906f8ddcc88b1ad45a0bd8a77d7aee2e38b027909bd437fe73391ed3
rsrctypearticles
prefilterarticles
languageeng
creationdate2011
topic
0Allergy and Immunology
1Applied microbiology
2Biological and medical sciences
3Epidemics
4Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology
5H1N1
6Humans
7Immunization
8Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - immunology
9Influenza Vaccines - administration & dosage
10Influenza Vaccines - immunology
11Influenza, Human - prevention & control
12Influenza, Human - virology
13Microbiology
14Pandemic
15Pandemics - prevention & control
16Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
17Psychological factors
18Public health
19Swine flu
20Swine influenza
21Vaccination
22Vaccination - utilization
23Vaccines
24Vaccines, antisera, therapeutical immunoglobulins and monoclonal antibodies (general aspects)
25Womens health
toplevel
0peer_reviewed
1online_resources
creatorcontrib
0Bish, Alison
1Yardley, Lucy
2Nicoll, Angus
3Michie, Susan
collection
0Pascal-Francis
1Medline
2MEDLINE
3MEDLINE (Ovid)
4MEDLINE
5MEDLINE
6PubMed
7CrossRef
8Academic OneFile (A&I only)
9ProQuest Central (Corporate)
10Bacteriology Abstracts (Microbiology B)
11Nursing & Allied Health Database
12Health and Safety Science Abstracts (Full archive)
13Immunology Abstracts
14Virology and AIDS Abstracts
15Health & Medical Collection
16ProQuest Central (purchase pre-March 2016)
17Healthcare Administration Database (Alumni)
18Medical Database (Alumni Edition)
19ProQuest Pharma Collection
20Public Health Database
21ProQuest SciTech Collection
22ProQuest Natural Science Collection
23Hospital Premium Collection
24Hospital Premium Collection (Alumni Edition)
25ProQuest Central (Alumni) (purchase pre-March 2016)
26Research Library (Alumni Edition)
27ProQuest Central (Alumni Edition)
28ProQuest Central Essentials
29Biological Science Collection
30ProQuest Central
31Natural Science Collection
32Environmental Sciences and Pollution Management
33ProQuest Central Korea
34Health Research Premium Collection
35Health Research Premium Collection (Alumni)
36ProQuest Central Student
37Research Library Prep
38AIDS and Cancer Research Abstracts
39SciTech Premium Collection
40Consumer Health Database (Alumni Edition)
41ProQuest Health & Medical Complete (Alumni)
42Nursing & Allied Health Database (Alumni Edition)
43ProQuest Biological Science Collection
44Consumer Health Database
45Health & Medical Collection (Alumni Edition)
46Healthcare Administration Database
47Medical Database
48Research Library
49Algology Mycology and Protozoology Abstracts (Microbiology C)
50Biological Science Database
51Research Library (Corporate)
52Nursing & Allied Health Premium
53ProQuest One Academic Eastern Edition
54ProQuest One Academic
55ProQuest One Academic UKI Edition
56ProQuest Central Basic
57MEDLINE - Academic
jtitleVaccine
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextfulltext
addata
au
0Bish, Alison
1Yardley, Lucy
2Nicoll, Angus
3Michie, Susan
formatjournal
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
atitleFactors associated with uptake of vaccination against pandemic influenza: A systematic review
jtitleVaccine
addtitleVaccine
date2011
risdate2011
volume29
issue38
spage6472
epage6484
pages6472-6484
issn0264-410X
eissn1873-2518
codenVACCDE
abstractAbstract Background In June 2009 a global influenza pandemic was declared by the World Health Organisation. A vaccination programme against H1N1 influenza was introduced in many countries from September 2009, but there was low uptake in both the general population and health professionals in many, though not all, countries. Purpose To examine the psychological and demographic factors associated with uptake of vaccination during the 2009 pandemic. Method A systematic literature review searching Web of Science and PubMed databases up to 24 January 2011. Results 37 articles met the study inclusion criteria. Using the framework of Protection Motivation Theory the review found that both the degree of threat experienced in the 2009 pandemic influenza outbreak and perceptions of vaccination as an effective coping strategy were associated with stronger intentions and higher uptake of vaccination. Appraisal of threat resulted from both believing oneself to be at risk from developing H1N1 influenza and concern and worry about the disease. Appraisal of coping resulted from concerns about the safety of the vaccine and its side effects. There was evidence of an influence of social pressure in that people who thought that others wanted them to be vaccinated were more likely to do so and people getting their information about vaccination from official health sources being more likely to be vaccinated than those relying on unofficial sources. There was also a strong influence of past behaviour, with those having been vaccinated in the past against seasonal influenza being more likely to be vaccinated against pandemic influenza. Demographic factors associated with higher intentions and uptake of vaccination were: older age, male gender, being from an ethnic minority and, for health professionals, being a doctor. Discussion Interventions designed to increase vaccination rates could be developed and implemented in advance of a pandemic. Strategies to improve uptake of vaccination include interventions which highlight the risk posed by pandemic influenza while simultaneously offering tactics to ameliorate this risk (e.g. vaccination). Perceived concerns about vaccination can be tackled by reducing the omission bias (a perception that harm caused by action is worse than harm caused by inaction). In addition, interventions to increase seasonal influenza vaccination in advance of a future pandemic may be an effective strategy.
copKidlington
pubElsevier Ltd
pmid21756960
doi10.1016/j.vaccine.2011.06.107