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Seeds of Change: Corn Seed Mixtures for Resistance Management and Integrated Pest Management

The use of mixtures of transgenic insecticidal seed and nontransgenic seed to provide an in-field refuge for susceptible insects in insect-resistance-management (IRM) plans has been considered for at least two decades. However, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has only recently authorized th... Full description

Journal Title: Journal of economic entomology 2011-04, Vol.104 (2), p.343-352
Main Author: Onstad, David W
Other Authors: Mitchell, Paul D , Hurley, Terrance M , Lundgren, Jonathan G , Patrick Porter, R , Krupke, Christian H , Spencer, Joseph L , Difonzo, Christine D , Baute, Tracey S , Hellmich, Richard L , Buschman, Lawrent L , Hutchison, William D , Tooker, John F
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: Lanham, MD: Entomological Society of America
ID: ISSN: 0022-0493
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recordid: cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_893262279
title: Seeds of Change: Corn Seed Mixtures for Resistance Management and Integrated Pest Management
format: Article
creator:
  • Onstad, David W
  • Mitchell, Paul D
  • Hurley, Terrance M
  • Lundgren, Jonathan G
  • Patrick Porter, R
  • Krupke, Christian H
  • Spencer, Joseph L
  • Difonzo, Christine D
  • Baute, Tracey S
  • Hellmich, Richard L
  • Buschman, Lawrent L
  • Hutchison, William D
  • Tooker, John F
subjects:
  • Adoption
  • Animals
  • Behavior, Animal
  • Biological and medical sciences
  • biological control
  • Bt corn
  • Control
  • Evolution
  • Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology
  • Generalities
  • Humans
  • Insect Control
  • insect resistance management
  • Insecticide Resistance
  • Integrated pest control
  • Natural enemies
  • Pest control
  • Pest resistance
  • Pests
  • Phytopathology. Animal pests. Plant and forest protection
  • Plants, Genetically Modified
  • Protozoa. Invertebrates
  • RAPID COMMUNICATION
  • refuge
  • secondary pests
  • Seeds
  • Zea mays
  • Zea mays - genetics
ispartof: Journal of economic entomology, 2011-04, Vol.104 (2), p.343-352
description: The use of mixtures of transgenic insecticidal seed and nontransgenic seed to provide an in-field refuge for susceptible insects in insect-resistance-management (IRM) plans has been considered for at least two decades. However, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has only recently authorized the practice. This commentary explores issues that regulators, industry, and other stakeholders should consider as the use of biotechnology increases and seed mixtures are implemented as a major tactic for IRM. We discuss how block refuges and seed mixtures in transgenic insecticidal corn, Zea mays L., production will influence integrated pest management (IPM) and the evolution of pest resistance. We conclude that seed mixtures will make pest monitoring more difficult and that seed mixtures may make IRM riskier because of larval behavior and greater adoption of insecticidal corn. Conversely, block refuges present a different suite of risks because of adult pest behavior and the lower compliance with IRM rules expected from farmers. It is likely that secondary pests not targeted by the insecticidal corn as well as natural enemies will respond differently to block refuges and seed mixtures.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0022-0493
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0022-0493
  • 1938-291X
url: Link


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titleSeeds of Change: Corn Seed Mixtures for Resistance Management and Integrated Pest Management
creatorOnstad, David W ; Mitchell, Paul D ; Hurley, Terrance M ; Lundgren, Jonathan G ; Patrick Porter, R ; Krupke, Christian H ; Spencer, Joseph L ; Difonzo, Christine D ; Baute, Tracey S ; Hellmich, Richard L ; Buschman, Lawrent L ; Hutchison, William D ; Tooker, John F
creatorcontribOnstad, David W ; Mitchell, Paul D ; Hurley, Terrance M ; Lundgren, Jonathan G ; Patrick Porter, R ; Krupke, Christian H ; Spencer, Joseph L ; Difonzo, Christine D ; Baute, Tracey S ; Hellmich, Richard L ; Buschman, Lawrent L ; Hutchison, William D ; Tooker, John F
descriptionThe use of mixtures of transgenic insecticidal seed and nontransgenic seed to provide an in-field refuge for susceptible insects in insect-resistance-management (IRM) plans has been considered for at least two decades. However, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has only recently authorized the practice. This commentary explores issues that regulators, industry, and other stakeholders should consider as the use of biotechnology increases and seed mixtures are implemented as a major tactic for IRM. We discuss how block refuges and seed mixtures in transgenic insecticidal corn, Zea mays L., production will influence integrated pest management (IPM) and the evolution of pest resistance. We conclude that seed mixtures will make pest monitoring more difficult and that seed mixtures may make IRM riskier because of larval behavior and greater adoption of insecticidal corn. Conversely, block refuges present a different suite of risks because of adult pest behavior and the lower compliance with IRM rules expected from farmers. It is likely that secondary pests not targeted by the insecticidal corn as well as natural enemies will respond differently to block refuges and seed mixtures.
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subjectAdoption ; Animals ; Behavior, Animal ; Biological and medical sciences ; biological control ; Bt corn ; Control ; Evolution ; Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology ; Generalities ; Humans ; Insect Control ; insect resistance management ; Insecticide Resistance ; Integrated pest control ; Natural enemies ; Pest control ; Pest resistance ; Pests ; Phytopathology. Animal pests. Plant and forest protection ; Plants, Genetically Modified ; Protozoa. Invertebrates ; RAPID COMMUNICATION ; refuge ; secondary pests ; Seeds ; Zea mays ; Zea mays - genetics
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7Difonzo, Christine D
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1Journal of economic entomology
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descriptionThe use of mixtures of transgenic insecticidal seed and nontransgenic seed to provide an in-field refuge for susceptible insects in insect-resistance-management (IRM) plans has been considered for at least two decades. However, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has only recently authorized the practice. This commentary explores issues that regulators, industry, and other stakeholders should consider as the use of biotechnology increases and seed mixtures are implemented as a major tactic for IRM. We discuss how block refuges and seed mixtures in transgenic insecticidal corn, Zea mays L., production will influence integrated pest management (IPM) and the evolution of pest resistance. We conclude that seed mixtures will make pest monitoring more difficult and that seed mixtures may make IRM riskier because of larval behavior and greater adoption of insecticidal corn. Conversely, block refuges present a different suite of risks because of adult pest behavior and the lower compliance with IRM rules expected from farmers. It is likely that secondary pests not targeted by the insecticidal corn as well as natural enemies will respond differently to block refuges and seed mixtures.
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1Animals
2Behavior, Animal
3Biological and medical sciences
4biological control
5Bt corn
6Control
7Evolution
8Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology
9Generalities
10Humans
11Insect Control
12insect resistance management
13Insecticide Resistance
14Integrated pest control
15Natural enemies
16Pest control
17Pest resistance
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19Phytopathology. Animal pests. Plant and forest protection
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21Protozoa. Invertebrates
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24secondary pests
25Seeds
26Zea mays
27Zea mays - genetics
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8Baute, Tracey S
9Hellmich, Richard L
10Buschman, Lawrent L
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titleSeeds of Change: Corn Seed Mixtures for Resistance Management and Integrated Pest Management
authorOnstad, David W ; Mitchell, Paul D ; Hurley, Terrance M ; Lundgren, Jonathan G ; Patrick Porter, R ; Krupke, Christian H ; Spencer, Joseph L ; Difonzo, Christine D ; Baute, Tracey S ; Hellmich, Richard L ; Buschman, Lawrent L ; Hutchison, William D ; Tooker, John F
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9Generalities
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11Insect Control
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13Insecticide Resistance
14Integrated pest control
15Natural enemies
16Pest control
17Pest resistance
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19Phytopathology. Animal pests. Plant and forest protection
20Plants, Genetically Modified
21Protozoa. Invertebrates
22RAPID COMMUNICATION
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24secondary pests
25Seeds
26Zea mays
27Zea mays - genetics
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7Difonzo, Christine D
8Baute, Tracey S
9Hellmich, Richard L
10Buschman, Lawrent L
11Hutchison, William D
12Tooker, John F
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8Baute, Tracey S
9Hellmich, Richard L
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abstractThe use of mixtures of transgenic insecticidal seed and nontransgenic seed to provide an in-field refuge for susceptible insects in insect-resistance-management (IRM) plans has been considered for at least two decades. However, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has only recently authorized the practice. This commentary explores issues that regulators, industry, and other stakeholders should consider as the use of biotechnology increases and seed mixtures are implemented as a major tactic for IRM. We discuss how block refuges and seed mixtures in transgenic insecticidal corn, Zea mays L., production will influence integrated pest management (IPM) and the evolution of pest resistance. We conclude that seed mixtures will make pest monitoring more difficult and that seed mixtures may make IRM riskier because of larval behavior and greater adoption of insecticidal corn. Conversely, block refuges present a different suite of risks because of adult pest behavior and the lower compliance with IRM rules expected from farmers. It is likely that secondary pests not targeted by the insecticidal corn as well as natural enemies will respond differently to block refuges and seed mixtures.
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