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Childhood socioeconomic status and adult health: comparing formative and reflective models in the Aberdeen Children of the 1950s Study (prospective cohort study)

BackgroundHealth at midlife is associated with early-life socioeconomic status (SES), intelligence and education; the latter often used as a marker of SES in adulthood. SES is typically modelled as a latent construct with reflective indicators (where the construct causes the variables) but may be be... Full description

Journal Title: Journal of epidemiology and community health (1979) 2011, Vol.65 (11), p.1024-1029
Main Author: Hagger-Johnson, Gareth
Other Authors: Batty, G David , Deary, Ian J , von Stumm, Sophie
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: London: BMJ Publishing Group Ltd
ID: ISSN: 0143-005X
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recordid: cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_898506177
title: Childhood socioeconomic status and adult health: comparing formative and reflective models in the Aberdeen Children of the 1950s Study (prospective cohort study)
format: Article
creator:
  • Hagger-Johnson, Gareth
  • Batty, G David
  • Deary, Ian J
  • von Stumm, Sophie
subjects:
  • Ability tests
  • Adult education
  • Adulthood
  • Biological and medical sciences
  • Child
  • Childhood
  • Cognition & reasoning
  • Cognitive ability
  • Cognitive models
  • Cohort Studies
  • Community health
  • Councils
  • Demographic aspects
  • Economic models
  • Education
  • Educational attainment
  • Ethics
  • Families & family life
  • Female
  • General aspects
  • Health
  • Health disparities
  • Health Status
  • Hospitals
  • Housing
  • Humans
  • Intelligence
  • Lifecourse
  • Male
  • Medical sciences
  • Middle Aged
  • Miscellaneous
  • Modeling
  • Models, Theoretical
  • Prospective Studies
  • Public health. Hygiene
  • Public health. Hygiene-occupational medicine
  • Scotland
  • Social Class
  • Social classes
  • Socioeconomic factors
  • Socioeconomic status
  • Studies
  • Surveys and Questionnaires
  • Tenure
  • Variables
ispartof: Journal of epidemiology and community health (1979), 2011, Vol.65 (11), p.1024-1029
description: BackgroundHealth at midlife is associated with early-life socioeconomic status (SES), intelligence and education; the latter often used as a marker of SES in adulthood. SES is typically modelled as a latent construct with reflective indicators (where the construct causes the variables) but may be better operationalised as a formative trait (where the variables cause the construct). In this report, the authors explain the difference between these two approaches and evaluate reflective and formative modelling for the prediction of health outcomes.MethodsThe Aberdeen Children of the 1950s Study comprises 12150 children from the Aberdeen area of Scotland, of whom 7183 completed a follow-up questionnaire in middle age. Data were available on indicators of parental SES at birth of the participant, childhood intelligence at age 11 and education and self-rated health at midlife.ResultsChildhood SES predicted childhood intelligence and educational attainment in adulthood, both of which partially mediated the effects of SES on self-rated health. Both approaches produced well-fitting models (CFI>0.99, TLI>0.99 and RMSEA
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 0143-005X
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0143-005X
  • 1470-2738
url: Link


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titleChildhood socioeconomic status and adult health: comparing formative and reflective models in the Aberdeen Children of the 1950s Study (prospective cohort study)
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creatorHagger-Johnson, Gareth ; Batty, G David ; Deary, Ian J ; von Stumm, Sophie
creatorcontribHagger-Johnson, Gareth ; Batty, G David ; Deary, Ian J ; von Stumm, Sophie
descriptionBackgroundHealth at midlife is associated with early-life socioeconomic status (SES), intelligence and education; the latter often used as a marker of SES in adulthood. SES is typically modelled as a latent construct with reflective indicators (where the construct causes the variables) but may be better operationalised as a formative trait (where the variables cause the construct). In this report, the authors explain the difference between these two approaches and evaluate reflective and formative modelling for the prediction of health outcomes.MethodsThe Aberdeen Children of the 1950s Study comprises 12150 children from the Aberdeen area of Scotland, of whom 7183 completed a follow-up questionnaire in middle age. Data were available on indicators of parental SES at birth of the participant, childhood intelligence at age 11 and education and self-rated health at midlife.ResultsChildhood SES predicted childhood intelligence and educational attainment in adulthood, both of which partially mediated the effects of SES on self-rated health. Both approaches produced well-fitting models (CFI>0.99, TLI>0.99 and RMSEA<0.03), detected indirect effects from parental SES to health (all ps<0.001) and accounted for similar proportions of variance in health.ConclusionsIn these data, there was little difference between reflective and formative models of SES in their ability to elucidate pathways from childhood SES to adult health. Formative approaches to modelling SES seem appropriate theoretically, yet reflective models were equally informative. The outcome chosen here was self-rated health, but the models are extensible to other health outcomes. Results may differ in other data sets, suggesting that it is first appropriate to compare both strategies.
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subjectAbility tests ; Adult education ; Adulthood ; Biological and medical sciences ; Child ; Childhood ; Cognition & reasoning ; Cognitive ability ; Cognitive models ; Cohort Studies ; Community health ; Councils ; Demographic aspects ; Economic models ; Education ; Educational attainment ; Ethics ; Families & family life ; Female ; General aspects ; Health ; Health disparities ; Health Status ; Hospitals ; Housing ; Humans ; Intelligence ; Lifecourse ; Male ; Medical sciences ; Middle Aged ; Miscellaneous ; Modeling ; Models, Theoretical ; Prospective Studies ; Public health. Hygiene ; Public health. Hygiene-occupational medicine ; Scotland ; Social Class ; Social classes ; Socioeconomic factors ; Socioeconomic status ; Studies ; Surveys and Questionnaires ; Tenure ; Variables
ispartofJournal of epidemiology and community health (1979), 2011, Vol.65 (11), p.1024-1029
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0Childhood socioeconomic status and adult health: comparing formative and reflective models in the Aberdeen Children of the 1950s Study (prospective cohort study)
1Journal of epidemiology and community health (1979)
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descriptionBackgroundHealth at midlife is associated with early-life socioeconomic status (SES), intelligence and education; the latter often used as a marker of SES in adulthood. SES is typically modelled as a latent construct with reflective indicators (where the construct causes the variables) but may be better operationalised as a formative trait (where the variables cause the construct). In this report, the authors explain the difference between these two approaches and evaluate reflective and formative modelling for the prediction of health outcomes.MethodsThe Aberdeen Children of the 1950s Study comprises 12150 children from the Aberdeen area of Scotland, of whom 7183 completed a follow-up questionnaire in middle age. Data were available on indicators of parental SES at birth of the participant, childhood intelligence at age 11 and education and self-rated health at midlife.ResultsChildhood SES predicted childhood intelligence and educational attainment in adulthood, both of which partially mediated the effects of SES on self-rated health. Both approaches produced well-fitting models (CFI>0.99, TLI>0.99 and RMSEA<0.03), detected indirect effects from parental SES to health (all ps<0.001) and accounted for similar proportions of variance in health.ConclusionsIn these data, there was little difference between reflective and formative models of SES in their ability to elucidate pathways from childhood SES to adult health. Formative approaches to modelling SES seem appropriate theoretically, yet reflective models were equally informative. The outcome chosen here was self-rated health, but the models are extensible to other health outcomes. Results may differ in other data sets, suggesting that it is first appropriate to compare both strategies.
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14Education
15Educational attainment
16Ethics
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18Female
19General aspects
20Health
21Health disparities
22Health Status
23Hospitals
24Housing
25Humans
26Intelligence
27Lifecourse
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29Medical sciences
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31Miscellaneous
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37Scotland
38Social Class
39Social classes
40Socioeconomic factors
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42Studies
43Surveys and Questionnaires
44Tenure
45Variables
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abstractBackgroundHealth at midlife is associated with early-life socioeconomic status (SES), intelligence and education; the latter often used as a marker of SES in adulthood. SES is typically modelled as a latent construct with reflective indicators (where the construct causes the variables) but may be better operationalised as a formative trait (where the variables cause the construct). In this report, the authors explain the difference between these two approaches and evaluate reflective and formative modelling for the prediction of health outcomes.MethodsThe Aberdeen Children of the 1950s Study comprises 12150 children from the Aberdeen area of Scotland, of whom 7183 completed a follow-up questionnaire in middle age. Data were available on indicators of parental SES at birth of the participant, childhood intelligence at age 11 and education and self-rated health at midlife.ResultsChildhood SES predicted childhood intelligence and educational attainment in adulthood, both of which partially mediated the effects of SES on self-rated health. Both approaches produced well-fitting models (CFI>0.99, TLI>0.99 and RMSEA<0.03), detected indirect effects from parental SES to health (all ps<0.001) and accounted for similar proportions of variance in health.ConclusionsIn these data, there was little difference between reflective and formative models of SES in their ability to elucidate pathways from childhood SES to adult health. Formative approaches to modelling SES seem appropriate theoretically, yet reflective models were equally informative. The outcome chosen here was self-rated health, but the models are extensible to other health outcomes. Results may differ in other data sets, suggesting that it is first appropriate to compare both strategies.
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