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Genotypic and environmental variation in specific leaf area in a widespread Alpine plant after transplantation to different altitudes

Specific leaf area (SLA) is an important plant functional trait as it is an indicator of ecophysiological characteristics like relative growth rate, stress tolerance and leaf longevity. Substantial intraspecific variation in SLA is common and usually correlates with environmental conditions. For ins... Full description

Journal Title: Oecologia 2010-09-01, Vol.164 (1), p.141-150
Main Author: Scheepens, J. F
Other Authors: Frei, Eva S , Stöcklin, Jürg
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: Berlin/Heidelberg: Springer
ID: ISSN: 0029-8549
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recordid: cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_902348659
title: Genotypic and environmental variation in specific leaf area in a widespread Alpine plant after transplantation to different altitudes
format: Article
creator:
  • Scheepens, J. F
  • Frei, Eva S
  • Stöcklin, Jürg
subjects:
  • Adaptation, Biological
  • Adaptations
  • Altitude
  • Animal and plant ecology
  • Animal, plant and microbial ecology
  • Biological and medical sciences
  • Biomedical and Life Sciences
  • Campanula
  • Campanulaceae - genetics
  • Campanulaceae - growth & development
  • Climate
  • Droughts
  • Ecology
  • Environmental conditions
  • Environmental effects
  • Evolutionary genetics
  • Flowers
  • Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology
  • General aspects
  • Genetic Drift
  • Genetic research
  • Genetic variation
  • Genotype
  • Growth rate
  • Hydrology/Water Resources
  • Immunological tolerance
  • Leaf area
  • Leaves
  • Life Sciences
  • Longevity
  • Phenotype
  • Phenotypic plasticity
  • Phenotypic traits
  • Plant Leaves - growth & development
  • Plant Sciences
  • Plants
  • Plasticity
  • POPULATION ECOLOGY - ORIGINAL PAPER
  • Population genetics
  • Population mean
  • Seeds
  • Statistical variance
  • Stress
  • Temperature effects
  • Transplantation
ispartof: Oecologia, 2010-09-01, Vol.164 (1), p.141-150
description: Specific leaf area (SLA) is an important plant functional trait as it is an indicator of ecophysiological characteristics like relative growth rate, stress tolerance and leaf longevity. Substantial intraspecific variation in SLA is common and usually correlates with environmental conditions. For instance, SLA decreases with increasing altitude, which is understood as adjustment to temperature. It is generally assumed that intraspecific variation is mostly the result of environmentally induced phenotypic plasticity, but genetic effects may also be present, due to local adaptation or genetic drift. In this study, genotypic and environmental effects on SLA were experimentally separated for the widespread Alpine bell flower Campanula thyrsoides by transplanting plants to three common gardens at contrasting altitudes (600, 1,235 and 1,850 m a. s. L). Seeds were sampled from 18 populations in four phylogeographic regions within the European Alps. A strong plastic response was observed: SLA decreased with increasing altitude of the common gardens (22.0% of variation). The phylogeographic regions were differentiated in SLA in the common gardens (10.1% of variation), indicating that SLA is at least partly genetically determined. Plants from the six easternmost populations experienced a submediterranean climate and showed decreased SLA values in the three common gardens compared to populations to the west, which may be explained as adaptation to drought. Within these submediterranean populations, SLA decreased with altitude of origin in two out of three common gardens. Concluding, SLA shows strong phenotypic plasticity as well as substantial genetic effects, the latter probably being the result of adaptation to local conditions rather than genetic drift.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0029-8549
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0029-8549
  • 1432-1939
url: Link


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titleGenotypic and environmental variation in specific leaf area in a widespread Alpine plant after transplantation to different altitudes
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descriptionSpecific leaf area (SLA) is an important plant functional trait as it is an indicator of ecophysiological characteristics like relative growth rate, stress tolerance and leaf longevity. Substantial intraspecific variation in SLA is common and usually correlates with environmental conditions. For instance, SLA decreases with increasing altitude, which is understood as adjustment to temperature. It is generally assumed that intraspecific variation is mostly the result of environmentally induced phenotypic plasticity, but genetic effects may also be present, due to local adaptation or genetic drift. In this study, genotypic and environmental effects on SLA were experimentally separated for the widespread Alpine bell flower Campanula thyrsoides by transplanting plants to three common gardens at contrasting altitudes (600, 1,235 and 1,850 m a. s. L). Seeds were sampled from 18 populations in four phylogeographic regions within the European Alps. A strong plastic response was observed: SLA decreased with increasing altitude of the common gardens (22.0% of variation). The phylogeographic regions were differentiated in SLA in the common gardens (10.1% of variation), indicating that SLA is at least partly genetically determined. Plants from the six easternmost populations experienced a submediterranean climate and showed decreased SLA values in the three common gardens compared to populations to the west, which may be explained as adaptation to drought. Within these submediterranean populations, SLA decreased with altitude of origin in two out of three common gardens. Concluding, SLA shows strong phenotypic plasticity as well as substantial genetic effects, the latter probably being the result of adaptation to local conditions rather than genetic drift.
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subjectAdaptation, Biological ; Adaptations ; Altitude ; Animal and plant ecology ; Animal, plant and microbial ecology ; Biological and medical sciences ; Biomedical and Life Sciences ; Campanula ; Campanulaceae - genetics ; Campanulaceae - growth & development ; Climate ; Droughts ; Ecology ; Environmental conditions ; Environmental effects ; Evolutionary genetics ; Flowers ; Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology ; General aspects ; Genetic Drift ; Genetic research ; Genetic variation ; Genotype ; Growth rate ; Hydrology/Water Resources ; Immunological tolerance ; Leaf area ; Leaves ; Life Sciences ; Longevity ; Phenotype ; Phenotypic plasticity ; Phenotypic traits ; Plant Leaves - growth & development ; Plant Sciences ; Plants ; Plasticity ; POPULATION ECOLOGY - ORIGINAL PAPER ; Population genetics ; Population mean ; Seeds ; Statistical variance ; Stress ; Temperature effects ; Transplantation
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descriptionSpecific leaf area (SLA) is an important plant functional trait as it is an indicator of ecophysiological characteristics like relative growth rate, stress tolerance and leaf longevity. Substantial intraspecific variation in SLA is common and usually correlates with environmental conditions. For instance, SLA decreases with increasing altitude, which is understood as adjustment to temperature. It is generally assumed that intraspecific variation is mostly the result of environmentally induced phenotypic plasticity, but genetic effects may also be present, due to local adaptation or genetic drift. In this study, genotypic and environmental effects on SLA were experimentally separated for the widespread Alpine bell flower Campanula thyrsoides by transplanting plants to three common gardens at contrasting altitudes (600, 1,235 and 1,850 m a. s. L). Seeds were sampled from 18 populations in four phylogeographic regions within the European Alps. A strong plastic response was observed: SLA decreased with increasing altitude of the common gardens (22.0% of variation). The phylogeographic regions were differentiated in SLA in the common gardens (10.1% of variation), indicating that SLA is at least partly genetically determined. Plants from the six easternmost populations experienced a submediterranean climate and showed decreased SLA values in the three common gardens compared to populations to the west, which may be explained as adaptation to drought. Within these submediterranean populations, SLA decreased with altitude of origin in two out of three common gardens. Concluding, SLA shows strong phenotypic plasticity as well as substantial genetic effects, the latter probably being the result of adaptation to local conditions rather than genetic drift.
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5Biological and medical sciences
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7Campanula
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19Genetic Drift
20Genetic research
21Genetic variation
22Genotype
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24Hydrology/Water Resources
25Immunological tolerance
26Leaf area
27Leaves
28Life Sciences
29Longevity
30Phenotype
31Phenotypic plasticity
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33Plant Leaves - growth & development
34Plant Sciences
35Plants
36Plasticity
37POPULATION ECOLOGY - ORIGINAL PAPER
38Population genetics
39Population mean
40Seeds
41Statistical variance
42Stress
43Temperature effects
44Transplantation
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titleGenotypic and environmental variation in specific leaf area in a widespread Alpine plant after transplantation to different altitudes
authorScheepens, J. F ; Frei, Eva S ; Stöcklin, Jürg
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abstractSpecific leaf area (SLA) is an important plant functional trait as it is an indicator of ecophysiological characteristics like relative growth rate, stress tolerance and leaf longevity. Substantial intraspecific variation in SLA is common and usually correlates with environmental conditions. For instance, SLA decreases with increasing altitude, which is understood as adjustment to temperature. It is generally assumed that intraspecific variation is mostly the result of environmentally induced phenotypic plasticity, but genetic effects may also be present, due to local adaptation or genetic drift. In this study, genotypic and environmental effects on SLA were experimentally separated for the widespread Alpine bell flower Campanula thyrsoides by transplanting plants to three common gardens at contrasting altitudes (600, 1,235 and 1,850 m a. s. L). Seeds were sampled from 18 populations in four phylogeographic regions within the European Alps. A strong plastic response was observed: SLA decreased with increasing altitude of the common gardens (22.0% of variation). The phylogeographic regions were differentiated in SLA in the common gardens (10.1% of variation), indicating that SLA is at least partly genetically determined. Plants from the six easternmost populations experienced a submediterranean climate and showed decreased SLA values in the three common gardens compared to populations to the west, which may be explained as adaptation to drought. Within these submediterranean populations, SLA decreased with altitude of origin in two out of three common gardens. Concluding, SLA shows strong phenotypic plasticity as well as substantial genetic effects, the latter probably being the result of adaptation to local conditions rather than genetic drift.
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doi10.1007/s00442-010-1650-0
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