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Estimates of Year-to-Year Volatility in Earnings and in Household Incomes from Administrative, Survey, and Matched Data

We document trends in the volatility in earnings and household incomes between 1985 and 2005 in three different data sources: administrative earnings records, the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) matched to administrative earnings records, and SIPP survey data. In all data sources,... Full description

Journal Title: The Journal of human resources 2011-10-01, Vol.46 (4), p.750-774
Main Author: Dahl, Molly W
Other Authors: DeLeire, Thomas C , Schwabish, Jonathan A
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: Madison: University of Wisconsin Press
ID: ISSN: 0022-166X
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title: Estimates of Year-to-Year Volatility in Earnings and in Household Incomes from Administrative, Survey, and Matched Data
format: Article
creator:
  • Dahl, Molly W
  • DeLeire, Thomas C
  • Schwabish, Jonathan A
subjects:
  • Administration
  • Administrative records
  • Data security
  • Earned income
  • Earnings
  • Economic trends
  • Estimation
  • Family income
  • Forecasting
  • Household income
  • Households
  • Human resources
  • Income
  • Income estimates
  • Income inequality
  • Personal income
  • Social surveys
  • Studies
  • Survey data
  • Surveys
  • United States
  • Volatility
  • Volatility (Finance)
  • Wages
  • Wages & salaries
  • Work
  • Workers
ispartof: The Journal of human resources, 2011-10-01, Vol.46 (4), p.750-774
description: We document trends in the volatility in earnings and household incomes between 1985 and 2005 in three different data sources: administrative earnings records, the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) matched to administrative earnings records, and SIPP survey data. In all data sources, we find a substantial amount of year-to-year volatility in workers' earnings and household incomes. In the data sources that contain administrative earnings, we find that volatility has been roughly constant, and has even declined slightly, since the mid-1980s. These findings differ from what is found using survey data and what has been reported in previous studies.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0022-166X
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0022-166X
  • 1548-8004
  • 1548-8004
url: Link


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titleEstimates of Year-to-Year Volatility in Earnings and in Household Incomes from Administrative, Survey, and Matched Data
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descriptionWe document trends in the volatility in earnings and household incomes between 1985 and 2005 in three different data sources: administrative earnings records, the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) matched to administrative earnings records, and SIPP survey data. In all data sources, we find a substantial amount of year-to-year volatility in workers' earnings and household incomes. In the data sources that contain administrative earnings, we find that volatility has been roughly constant, and has even declined slightly, since the mid-1980s. These findings differ from what is found using survey data and what has been reported in previous studies.
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subjectAdministration ; Administrative records ; Data security ; Earned income ; Earnings ; Economic trends ; Estimation ; Family income ; Forecasting ; Household income ; Households ; Human resources ; Income ; Income estimates ; Income inequality ; Personal income ; Social surveys ; Studies ; Survey data ; Surveys ; United States ; Volatility ; Volatility (Finance) ; Wages ; Wages & salaries ; Work ; Workers
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abstractWe document trends in the volatility in earnings and household incomes between 1985 and 2005 in three different data sources: administrative earnings records, the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) matched to administrative earnings records, and SIPP survey data. In all data sources, we find a substantial amount of year-to-year volatility in workers' earnings and household incomes. In the data sources that contain administrative earnings, we find that volatility has been roughly constant, and has even declined slightly, since the mid-1980s. These findings differ from what is found using survey data and what has been reported in previous studies.
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