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Belief Systems and Social Capital as Drivers of Policy Network Structure: The Case of California Regional Planning

This article uses exponential random graph models to investigate the roles of policy-relevant beliefs and social capital as drivers of network structure. The advocacy coalition framework argues that actors with similar policy beliefs are more likely to form coalitions, leading to policy subsystems f... Full description

Journal Title: Journal of public administration research and theory 2011-07-01, Vol.21 (3), p.419-444
Main Author: Henry, Adam Douglas
Other Authors: Lubell, Mark , McCoy, Michael
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: Oxford: Oxford University Press
ID: ISSN: 1053-1858
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recordid: cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_920056942
title: Belief Systems and Social Capital as Drivers of Policy Network Structure: The Case of California Regional Planning
format: Article
creator:
  • Henry, Adam Douglas
  • Lubell, Mark
  • McCoy, Michael
subjects:
  • Area planning & development
  • Beliefs
  • Brokers
  • California
  • Coalitions
  • Collaboration
  • Cooperation
  • Environmental policy
  • Land use planning
  • Local government
  • Networks
  • Planning
  • Planning methods
  • Policy making
  • Public administration
  • Reciprocity
  • Regional planning
  • Regions
  • Sabatier, Paul
  • Simmel, Georg
  • Smart growth
  • Social Capital
  • Social structures
  • Studies
  • Transportation
  • Transportation planning
  • Trust
  • U.S.A
ispartof: Journal of public administration research and theory, 2011-07-01, Vol.21 (3), p.419-444
description: This article uses exponential random graph models to investigate the roles of policy-relevant beliefs and social capital as drivers of network structure. The advocacy coalition framework argues that actors with similar policy beliefs are more likely to form coalitions, leading to policy subsystems fragmented into ideological groups. Social capital is defined as trust and norms of reciprocity, which helps cement cooperative relationships. Hypotheses are tested using survey data of policy elites involved in land-use and transportation planning in four regions of California. The findings suggest that coalitions of actors with similar belief systems are knit together by policy brokers seeking to build transitive social relationships.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 1053-1858
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 1053-1858
  • 1477-9803
url: Link


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titleBelief Systems and Social Capital as Drivers of Policy Network Structure: The Case of California Regional Planning
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descriptionThis article uses exponential random graph models to investigate the roles of policy-relevant beliefs and social capital as drivers of network structure. The advocacy coalition framework argues that actors with similar policy beliefs are more likely to form coalitions, leading to policy subsystems fragmented into ideological groups. Social capital is defined as trust and norms of reciprocity, which helps cement cooperative relationships. Hypotheses are tested using survey data of policy elites involved in land-use and transportation planning in four regions of California. The findings suggest that coalitions of actors with similar belief systems are knit together by policy brokers seeking to build transitive social relationships.
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subjectArea planning & development ; Beliefs ; Brokers ; California ; Coalitions ; Collaboration ; Cooperation ; Environmental policy ; Land use planning ; Local government ; Networks ; Planning ; Planning methods ; Policy making ; Public administration ; Reciprocity ; Regional planning ; Regions ; Sabatier, Paul ; Simmel, Georg ; Smart growth ; Social Capital ; Social structures ; Studies ; Transportation ; Transportation planning ; Trust ; U.S.A
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0Copyright © 2011 Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory, Inc.
1The Author 2010. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory, Inc. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com 2011
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abstractThis article uses exponential random graph models to investigate the roles of policy-relevant beliefs and social capital as drivers of network structure. The advocacy coalition framework argues that actors with similar policy beliefs are more likely to form coalitions, leading to policy subsystems fragmented into ideological groups. Social capital is defined as trust and norms of reciprocity, which helps cement cooperative relationships. Hypotheses are tested using survey data of policy elites involved in land-use and transportation planning in four regions of California. The findings suggest that coalitions of actors with similar belief systems are knit together by policy brokers seeking to build transitive social relationships.
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