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The Impact of Regime Type on Health: Does Redistribution Explain Everything?

Many scholars claim that democracy improves population health. The prevailing explanation for this is that democratic regimes distribute health-promoting resources more widely than autocratic regimes. The central contention of this article is that democracies also have a significant pro-health effec... Full description

Journal Title: World politics 2011, Vol.63 (4), p.647-677
Main Author: Wigley, Simon
Other Authors: Akkoyunlu-Wigley, Arzu
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press
ID: ISSN: 0043-8871
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22175088
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recordid: cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_925701347
title: The Impact of Regime Type on Health: Does Redistribution Explain Everything?
format: Article
creator:
  • Wigley, Simon
  • Akkoyunlu-Wigley, Arzu
subjects:
  • 20th Century
  • 21st Century
  • Autocracy
  • Comparative government
  • Competition
  • Cross-national analysis
  • Democracy
  • Economic aspects
  • Economics
  • Education
  • Educational attainment
  • Ethnic And Racial Groups
  • Ethnology
  • Freedom
  • Freedom of the press
  • Governance
  • Government & Law
  • Government spending
  • Health Care Policy
  • Health Care Services Policy
  • Health Impact
  • Health Policy
  • Health Policy - economics
  • Health Policy - history
  • Health Promotion
  • Health Promotion - economics
  • Health Promotion - history
  • History
  • History of medicine
  • History, 20th Century
  • History, 21st Century
  • Human
  • Humans
  • Interest groups
  • International politics
  • International Relations
  • Legal Aspect
  • Life Expectancy
  • Life Expectancy - ethnology
  • Life Expectancy - history
  • Longevity
  • Mass Media Effects
  • Mortality
  • News media
  • Political aspects
  • Political economy
  • Political regimes
  • Political System
  • Political Systems
  • Political Systems - history
  • Population Distribution
  • Population Groups
  • Population Groups - education
  • Population Groups - ethnology
  • Population Groups - history
  • Population Groups - legislation & jurisprudence
  • Population Groups - psychology
  • Population health
  • Psychological Aspect
  • Public Health
  • Public Health - economics
  • Public Health - education
  • Public Health - history
  • Public policy
  • Redistributive social security
  • Social capital
  • Social services
  • Studies
ispartof: World politics, 2011, Vol.63 (4), p.647-677
description: Many scholars claim that democracy improves population health. The prevailing explanation for this is that democratic regimes distribute health-promoting resources more widely than autocratic regimes. The central contention of this article is that democracies also have a significant pro-health effect regardless of public redistributive policies. After establishing the theoretical plausibility of the nondistributive effect, a panel of 153 countries for the years 1972 to 2000 is used to examine the relationship between extent of democratic experience and life expectancy. The authors find that democratic governance continues to have a salutary effect on population health even when controls are introduced for the distribution of health-enhancing resources. Data for fifty autocratic countries for the years 1994 to 2007 are then used to examine whether media freedom—independent of government responsiveness—has a positive impact on life expectancy.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0043-8871
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0043-8871
  • 1086-3338
url: Link


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descriptionMany scholars claim that democracy improves population health. The prevailing explanation for this is that democratic regimes distribute health-promoting resources more widely than autocratic regimes. The central contention of this article is that democracies also have a significant pro-health effect regardless of public redistributive policies. After establishing the theoretical plausibility of the nondistributive effect, a panel of 153 countries for the years 1972 to 2000 is used to examine the relationship between extent of democratic experience and life expectancy. The authors find that democratic governance continues to have a salutary effect on population health even when controls are introduced for the distribution of health-enhancing resources. Data for fifty autocratic countries for the years 1994 to 2007 are then used to examine whether media freedom—independent of government responsiveness—has a positive impact on life expectancy.
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subject20th Century ; 21st Century ; Autocracy ; Comparative government ; Competition ; Cross-national analysis ; Democracy ; Economic aspects ; Economics ; Education ; Educational attainment ; Ethnic And Racial Groups ; Ethnology ; Freedom ; Freedom of the press ; Governance ; Government & Law ; Government spending ; Health Care Policy ; Health Care Services Policy ; Health Impact ; Health Policy ; Health Policy - economics ; Health Policy - history ; Health Promotion ; Health Promotion - economics ; Health Promotion - history ; History ; History of medicine ; History, 20th Century ; History, 21st Century ; Human ; Humans ; Interest groups ; International politics ; International Relations ; Legal Aspect ; Life Expectancy ; Life Expectancy - ethnology ; Life Expectancy - history ; Longevity ; Mass Media Effects ; Mortality ; News media ; Political aspects ; Political economy ; Political regimes ; Political System ; Political Systems ; Political Systems - history ; Population Distribution ; Population Groups ; Population Groups - education ; Population Groups - ethnology ; Population Groups - history ; Population Groups - legislation & jurisprudence ; Population Groups - psychology ; Population health ; Psychological Aspect ; Public Health ; Public Health - economics ; Public Health - education ; Public Health - history ; Public policy ; Redistributive social security ; Social capital ; Social services ; Studies
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121st Century
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11Ethnic And Racial Groups
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30History, 21st Century
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37Life Expectancy
38Life Expectancy - ethnology
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40Longevity
41Mass Media Effects
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44Political aspects
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46Political regimes
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51Population Groups
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53Population Groups - ethnology
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121st Century
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5Cross-national analysis
6Democracy
7Economic aspects
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9Education
10Educational attainment
11Ethnic And Racial Groups
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abstractMany scholars claim that democracy improves population health. The prevailing explanation for this is that democratic regimes distribute health-promoting resources more widely than autocratic regimes. The central contention of this article is that democracies also have a significant pro-health effect regardless of public redistributive policies. After establishing the theoretical plausibility of the nondistributive effect, a panel of 153 countries for the years 1972 to 2000 is used to examine the relationship between extent of democratic experience and life expectancy. The authors find that democratic governance continues to have a salutary effect on population health even when controls are introduced for the distribution of health-enhancing resources. Data for fifty autocratic countries for the years 1994 to 2007 are then used to examine whether media freedom—independent of government responsiveness—has a positive impact on life expectancy.
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pubCambridge University Press
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doi10.1017/S0043887111000177
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