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Biochar adsorbed ammonia is bioavailable

Biochar is produced as a by-product of the low temperature pyrolysis of biomass during bioenergy extraction and its incorporation into soil is of global interest as a potential carbon sequestration tool. Biochar influences soil nitrogen transformations and its capacity to take up ammonia is well rec... Full description

Journal Title: Plant and soil 2012-01-01, Vol.350 (1-2), p.57-69
Main Author: Taghizadeh-Toosi, Arezoo
Other Authors: Clough, Tim J , Sherlock, Robert R , Condron, Leo M
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: Dordrecht: Springer
ID: ISSN: 0032-079X
Link: http://pascal-francis.inist.fr/vibad/index.php?action=getRecordDetail&idt=25578720
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recordid: cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_926894192
title: Biochar adsorbed ammonia is bioavailable
format: Article
creator:
  • Taghizadeh-Toosi, Arezoo
  • Clough, Tim J
  • Sherlock, Robert R
  • Condron, Leo M
subjects:
  • Acid soils
  • Agricultural soils
  • Agrology
  • Agronomy. Soil science and plant productions
  • Ammonia
  • Animal, plant and microbial ecology
  • anthropogenic factors
  • Anthropology
  • Bioavailability
  • Biochar
  • Biological and medical sciences
  • Biomass
  • Biomedical and Life Sciences
  • Byproducts
  • Carbon
  • Carbon dioxide emissions
  • Chemical properties
  • Crops
  • Ecology
  • Economics
  • Emissions
  • Environmental impact
  • Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology
  • General agronomy. Plant production
  • Identification and classification
  • Isotopes
  • Leaves
  • Life Sciences
  • low temperature
  • Nitrogen
  • Plant Physiology
  • Plant Sciences
  • Plants
  • Pyrolysis
  • Regular Article
  • Roots
  • Silt loam soils
  • Soil
  • Soil air
  • Soil chemistry
  • Soil composition
  • Soil research
  • Soil Science & Conservation
  • Soil temperature
  • Soil-plant relationships. Soil fertility
  • Soil-plant relationships. Soil fertility. Fertilization. Amendments
  • Transformation
ispartof: Plant and soil, 2012-01-01, Vol.350 (1-2), p.57-69
description: Biochar is produced as a by-product of the low temperature pyrolysis of biomass during bioenergy extraction and its incorporation into soil is of global interest as a potential carbon sequestration tool. Biochar influences soil nitrogen transformations and its capacity to take up ammonia is well recognized. Anthropogenic emissions of ammonia need to be mitigated due to negative environmental impacts and economic losses. Here we use an isotope of nitrogen to show that ammonia-N adsorbed by biochar is stable in ambient air, but readily bioavailable when placed in the soil. When biochars, containing adsorbed 15N labelled ammonia, were incorporated into soil the 15N recovery by roots averaged 6.8% but ranged from 26.1% to 10.9% in leaf tissue due to differing biochar properties with plant 15N recovery greater when acidic biochars were used to capture ammonia. Recovery of 15N as total soil nitrogen (organic+inorganic) ranged from 45% to 29% of 15N applied. We provide a proof of concept for a synergistic mitigation option where anthropogenic ammonia emissions could be captured using biochar, and made bioavailable in soils, thus leading to nitrogen capture by crops, while simultaneously sequestering carbon in soils.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0032-079X
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0032-079X
  • 1573-5036
url: Link


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descriptionBiochar is produced as a by-product of the low temperature pyrolysis of biomass during bioenergy extraction and its incorporation into soil is of global interest as a potential carbon sequestration tool. Biochar influences soil nitrogen transformations and its capacity to take up ammonia is well recognized. Anthropogenic emissions of ammonia need to be mitigated due to negative environmental impacts and economic losses. Here we use an isotope of nitrogen to show that ammonia-N adsorbed by biochar is stable in ambient air, but readily bioavailable when placed in the soil. When biochars, containing adsorbed 15N labelled ammonia, were incorporated into soil the 15N recovery by roots averaged 6.8% but ranged from 26.1% to 10.9% in leaf tissue due to differing biochar properties with plant 15N recovery greater when acidic biochars were used to capture ammonia. Recovery of 15N as total soil nitrogen (organic+inorganic) ranged from 45% to 29% of 15N applied. We provide a proof of concept for a synergistic mitigation option where anthropogenic ammonia emissions could be captured using biochar, and made bioavailable in soils, thus leading to nitrogen capture by crops, while simultaneously sequestering carbon in soils.
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subjectAcid soils ; Agricultural soils ; Agrology ; Agronomy. Soil science and plant productions ; Ammonia ; Animal, plant and microbial ecology ; anthropogenic factors ; Anthropology ; Bioavailability ; Biochar ; Biological and medical sciences ; Biomass ; Biomedical and Life Sciences ; Byproducts ; Carbon ; Carbon dioxide emissions ; Chemical properties ; Crops ; Ecology ; Economics ; Emissions ; Environmental impact ; Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology ; General agronomy. Plant production ; Identification and classification ; Isotopes ; Leaves ; Life Sciences ; low temperature ; Nitrogen ; Plant Physiology ; Plant Sciences ; Plants ; Pyrolysis ; Regular Article ; Roots ; Silt loam soils ; Soil ; Soil air ; Soil chemistry ; Soil composition ; Soil research ; Soil Science & Conservation ; Soil temperature ; Soil-plant relationships. Soil fertility ; Soil-plant relationships. Soil fertility. Fertilization. Amendments ; Transformation
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descriptionBiochar is produced as a by-product of the low temperature pyrolysis of biomass during bioenergy extraction and its incorporation into soil is of global interest as a potential carbon sequestration tool. Biochar influences soil nitrogen transformations and its capacity to take up ammonia is well recognized. Anthropogenic emissions of ammonia need to be mitigated due to negative environmental impacts and economic losses. Here we use an isotope of nitrogen to show that ammonia-N adsorbed by biochar is stable in ambient air, but readily bioavailable when placed in the soil. When biochars, containing adsorbed 15N labelled ammonia, were incorporated into soil the 15N recovery by roots averaged 6.8% but ranged from 26.1% to 10.9% in leaf tissue due to differing biochar properties with plant 15N recovery greater when acidic biochars were used to capture ammonia. Recovery of 15N as total soil nitrogen (organic+inorganic) ranged from 45% to 29% of 15N applied. We provide a proof of concept for a synergistic mitigation option where anthropogenic ammonia emissions could be captured using biochar, and made bioavailable in soils, thus leading to nitrogen capture by crops, while simultaneously sequestering carbon in soils.
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46Transformation
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abstractBiochar is produced as a by-product of the low temperature pyrolysis of biomass during bioenergy extraction and its incorporation into soil is of global interest as a potential carbon sequestration tool. Biochar influences soil nitrogen transformations and its capacity to take up ammonia is well recognized. Anthropogenic emissions of ammonia need to be mitigated due to negative environmental impacts and economic losses. Here we use an isotope of nitrogen to show that ammonia-N adsorbed by biochar is stable in ambient air, but readily bioavailable when placed in the soil. When biochars, containing adsorbed 15N labelled ammonia, were incorporated into soil the 15N recovery by roots averaged 6.8% but ranged from 26.1% to 10.9% in leaf tissue due to differing biochar properties with plant 15N recovery greater when acidic biochars were used to capture ammonia. Recovery of 15N as total soil nitrogen (organic+inorganic) ranged from 45% to 29% of 15N applied. We provide a proof of concept for a synergistic mitigation option where anthropogenic ammonia emissions could be captured using biochar, and made bioavailable in soils, thus leading to nitrogen capture by crops, while simultaneously sequestering carbon in soils.
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