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Species Displacements are Common to Two Invasive Species of Leafminer Fly in China, Japan, and the United States

Under field conditions, species displacements have occurred in different directions between the same invasive species of leafminers (Diptera: Agromyzidae). Liriomyza sativae (Blanchard) was displaced by L. trifolii (Burgess) in the western United States, with evidence suggesting that lower insectici... Full description

Journal Title: Journal of economic entomology 2011, Vol.104 (6), p.1771-1773
Main Author: Gao, Yulin
Other Authors: Lei, Zhongren , Abe, Yoshihisa , Reitz, Stuart R
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: Lanham, MD: Entomological Society of America
ID: ISSN: 0022-0493
Zum Text:
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recordid: cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_954645335
title: Species Displacements are Common to Two Invasive Species of Leafminer Fly in China, Japan, and the United States
format: Article
creator:
  • Gao, Yulin
  • Lei, Zhongren
  • Abe, Yoshihisa
  • Reitz, Stuart R
subjects:
  • Agromyzidae
  • Animals
  • Avermectin
  • Biological and medical sciences
  • biological invasion
  • China
  • Competitive Behavior
  • Control
  • cyromazine
  • Diptera
  • Diptera - drug effects
  • Diptera - growth & development
  • Diptera - physiology
  • Environmental factors
  • Fabaceae
  • Fecundity
  • Female
  • Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology
  • Generalities
  • Insecticide Resistance
  • insecticide susceptibility
  • Insecticides
  • Insecticides - pharmacology
  • Introduced Species
  • Islands
  • Ivermectin - analogs & derivatives
  • Ivermectin - pharmacology
  • Japan
  • Larva - drug effects
  • Larva - growth & development
  • Larva - physiology
  • Liriomyza sativae
  • Liriomyza trifolii
  • Male
  • Parasitoids
  • Phytopathology. Animal pests. Plant and forest protection
  • Protozoa. Invertebrates
  • RAPID COMMUNICATION
  • species displacement
  • Species Specificity
  • Triazines - pharmacology
  • United States
  • Vegetables
ispartof: Journal of economic entomology, 2011, Vol.104 (6), p.1771-1773
description: Under field conditions, species displacements have occurred in different directions between the same invasive species of leafminers (Diptera: Agromyzidae). Liriomyza sativae (Blanchard) was displaced by L. trifolii (Burgess) in the western United States, with evidence suggesting that lower insecticide susceptibility of L. trifolii is a factor. However, in Japan, the opposite has occurred, as L. trifolii was recently displaced by L. sativae. This displacement is probably because of the higher fecundity of L. sativae and differential effects of parasitoids on the two leafminer species. Here, we carried out long-term surveys of these same two invasive leafminer species during January through March in 1999,2007, and 2011, as well as June through July in 2011, in eight locations (Sanya, Dongfang, Haikou, Leidong, Lingshui, Wuzhisan, Qionghai, and Danzhou) across Hainan Island of southern China. Our results indicate that, between 2007 and 2011, L. trifolii rapidly replaced L. sativae as the predominant leafminer of vegetables on Hainan Island, similar to the situation in the western United States. Further surveys of growers revealed that avermectins and cyromazine are the two most frequently used insecticides against leafminers on Hainan Island. Dose-mortality tests showed that L. trifolii populations from Hainan Island are less susceptible to avermectins and cyromazine compared with L. sativae populations. This lower insecticide susceptibility of L. trifolii may be associated with the displacement of L. sativae by L. trifolii, although additional ecological or environmental factors cannot be ruled out.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0022-0493
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0022-0493
  • 1938-291X
url: Link


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titleSpecies Displacements are Common to Two Invasive Species of Leafminer Fly in China, Japan, and the United States
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descriptionUnder field conditions, species displacements have occurred in different directions between the same invasive species of leafminers (Diptera: Agromyzidae). Liriomyza sativae (Blanchard) was displaced by L. trifolii (Burgess) in the western United States, with evidence suggesting that lower insecticide susceptibility of L. trifolii is a factor. However, in Japan, the opposite has occurred, as L. trifolii was recently displaced by L. sativae. This displacement is probably because of the higher fecundity of L. sativae and differential effects of parasitoids on the two leafminer species. Here, we carried out long-term surveys of these same two invasive leafminer species during January through March in 1999,2007, and 2011, as well as June through July in 2011, in eight locations (Sanya, Dongfang, Haikou, Leidong, Lingshui, Wuzhisan, Qionghai, and Danzhou) across Hainan Island of southern China. Our results indicate that, between 2007 and 2011, L. trifolii rapidly replaced L. sativae as the predominant leafminer of vegetables on Hainan Island, similar to the situation in the western United States. Further surveys of growers revealed that avermectins and cyromazine are the two most frequently used insecticides against leafminers on Hainan Island. Dose-mortality tests showed that L. trifolii populations from Hainan Island are less susceptible to avermectins and cyromazine compared with L. sativae populations. This lower insecticide susceptibility of L. trifolii may be associated with the displacement of L. sativae by L. trifolii, although additional ecological or environmental factors cannot be ruled out.
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subjectAgromyzidae ; Animals ; Avermectin ; Biological and medical sciences ; biological invasion ; China ; Competitive Behavior ; Control ; cyromazine ; Diptera ; Diptera - drug effects ; Diptera - growth & development ; Diptera - physiology ; Environmental factors ; Fabaceae ; Fecundity ; Female ; Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology ; Generalities ; Insecticide Resistance ; insecticide susceptibility ; Insecticides ; Insecticides - pharmacology ; Introduced Species ; Islands ; Ivermectin - analogs & derivatives ; Ivermectin - pharmacology ; Japan ; Larva - drug effects ; Larva - growth & development ; Larva - physiology ; Liriomyza sativae ; Liriomyza trifolii ; Male ; Parasitoids ; Phytopathology. Animal pests. Plant and forest protection ; Protozoa. Invertebrates ; RAPID COMMUNICATION ; species displacement ; Species Specificity ; Triazines - pharmacology ; United States ; Vegetables
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0Species Displacements are Common to Two Invasive Species of Leafminer Fly in China, Japan, and the United States
1Journal of economic entomology
addtitleJ Econ Entomol
descriptionUnder field conditions, species displacements have occurred in different directions between the same invasive species of leafminers (Diptera: Agromyzidae). Liriomyza sativae (Blanchard) was displaced by L. trifolii (Burgess) in the western United States, with evidence suggesting that lower insecticide susceptibility of L. trifolii is a factor. However, in Japan, the opposite has occurred, as L. trifolii was recently displaced by L. sativae. This displacement is probably because of the higher fecundity of L. sativae and differential effects of parasitoids on the two leafminer species. Here, we carried out long-term surveys of these same two invasive leafminer species during January through March in 1999,2007, and 2011, as well as June through July in 2011, in eight locations (Sanya, Dongfang, Haikou, Leidong, Lingshui, Wuzhisan, Qionghai, and Danzhou) across Hainan Island of southern China. Our results indicate that, between 2007 and 2011, L. trifolii rapidly replaced L. sativae as the predominant leafminer of vegetables on Hainan Island, similar to the situation in the western United States. Further surveys of growers revealed that avermectins and cyromazine are the two most frequently used insecticides against leafminers on Hainan Island. Dose-mortality tests showed that L. trifolii populations from Hainan Island are less susceptible to avermectins and cyromazine compared with L. sativae populations. This lower insecticide susceptibility of L. trifolii may be associated with the displacement of L. sativae by L. trifolii, although additional ecological or environmental factors cannot be ruled out.
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0Agromyzidae
1Animals
2Avermectin
3Biological and medical sciences
4biological invasion
5China
6Competitive Behavior
7Control
8cyromazine
9Diptera
10Diptera - drug effects
11Diptera - growth & development
12Diptera - physiology
13Environmental factors
14Fabaceae
15Fecundity
16Female
17Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology
18Generalities
19Insecticide Resistance
20insecticide susceptibility
21Insecticides
22Insecticides - pharmacology
23Introduced Species
24Islands
25Ivermectin - analogs & derivatives
26Ivermectin - pharmacology
27Japan
28Larva - drug effects
29Larva - growth & development
30Larva - physiology
31Liriomyza sativae
32Liriomyza trifolii
33Male
34Parasitoids
35Phytopathology. Animal pests. Plant and forest protection
36Protozoa. Invertebrates
37RAPID COMMUNICATION
38species displacement
39Species Specificity
40Triazines - pharmacology
41United States
42Vegetables
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titleSpecies Displacements are Common to Two Invasive Species of Leafminer Fly in China, Japan, and the United States
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7Control
8cyromazine
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10Diptera - drug effects
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13Environmental factors
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16Female
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18Generalities
19Insecticide Resistance
20insecticide susceptibility
21Insecticides
22Insecticides - pharmacology
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24Islands
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29Larva - growth & development
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32Liriomyza trifolii
33Male
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40Triazines - pharmacology
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42Vegetables
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abstractUnder field conditions, species displacements have occurred in different directions between the same invasive species of leafminers (Diptera: Agromyzidae). Liriomyza sativae (Blanchard) was displaced by L. trifolii (Burgess) in the western United States, with evidence suggesting that lower insecticide susceptibility of L. trifolii is a factor. However, in Japan, the opposite has occurred, as L. trifolii was recently displaced by L. sativae. This displacement is probably because of the higher fecundity of L. sativae and differential effects of parasitoids on the two leafminer species. Here, we carried out long-term surveys of these same two invasive leafminer species during January through March in 1999,2007, and 2011, as well as June through July in 2011, in eight locations (Sanya, Dongfang, Haikou, Leidong, Lingshui, Wuzhisan, Qionghai, and Danzhou) across Hainan Island of southern China. Our results indicate that, between 2007 and 2011, L. trifolii rapidly replaced L. sativae as the predominant leafminer of vegetables on Hainan Island, similar to the situation in the western United States. Further surveys of growers revealed that avermectins and cyromazine are the two most frequently used insecticides against leafminers on Hainan Island. Dose-mortality tests showed that L. trifolii populations from Hainan Island are less susceptible to avermectins and cyromazine compared with L. sativae populations. This lower insecticide susceptibility of L. trifolii may be associated with the displacement of L. sativae by L. trifolii, although additional ecological or environmental factors cannot be ruled out.
copLanham, MD
pubEntomological Society of America
pmid22299335
doi10.1603/EC11206
tpages3