schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

Developing X-ray Computed Tomography to non-invasively image 3-D root systems architecture in soil

Background The need to observe roots in their natural undisturbed state within soil, both spatially and temporally, is a challenge that continues to occupy researchers studying the rhizosphere. Scope This paper reviews how over the last 30 years the application of X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) has... Full description

Journal Title: Plant and Soil 2012, Vol.352 (1-2), p.1-22
Main Author: Mooney, S. J
Other Authors: Pridmore, T. P , Helliwell, J , Bennett, M. J
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: Dordrecht: Springer
ID: ISSN: 0032-079X
Link: http://pascal-francis.inist.fr/vibad/index.php?action=getRecordDetail&idt=25604293
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_968173645
title: Developing X-ray Computed Tomography to non-invasively image 3-D root systems architecture in soil
format: Article
creator:
  • Mooney, S. J
  • Pridmore, T. P
  • Helliwell, J
  • Bennett, M. J
subjects:
  • Agronomy. Soil science and plant productions
  • Animal, plant and microbial ecology
  • Architecture
  • Biological and medical sciences
  • Biomedical and Life Sciences
  • Botanical research
  • Computerized axial tomography
  • CT imaging
  • Ecology
  • Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology
  • General agronomy. Plant production
  • Life Sciences
  • MARSCHNER REVIEW
  • Methods
  • Physiological aspects
  • Plant ecology
  • Plant growth
  • Plant Physiology
  • Plant roots
  • Plant Sciences
  • Plant-soil relationships
  • Plants
  • Root systems
  • Roots (Botany)
  • Sandy loam soils
  • Soil fertility
  • Soil pollution
  • Soil samples
  • Soil science
  • Soil Science & Conservation
  • Soil water
  • Soil-plant relationships. Soil fertility
  • Soil-plant relationships. Soil fertility. Fertilization. Amendments
  • Tomography
ispartof: Plant and Soil, 2012, Vol.352 (1-2), p.1-22
description: Background The need to observe roots in their natural undisturbed state within soil, both spatially and temporally, is a challenge that continues to occupy researchers studying the rhizosphere. Scope This paper reviews how over the last 30 years the application of X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) has demonstrated considerable promise for root visualisation studies. We describe how early CT work demonstrated that roots could be visualised within soils, but was limited by resolution (ca. 1 mm). Subsequent work, utilising newer micro CT scanners, has been able to achieve higher resolutions (ca. 50 μm) and enhance imaging capability in terms of detecting finer root material. However the overlap in the attenuation density of root material and soil pore space has been a major impediment to the uptake of the technology. We then outline how sophisticated image processing techniques, frequently based on object tracking methods, have demonstrated great promise in overcoming these obstacles. This, along with the concurrent advances in scan and reconstruction times, image quality and resolution (ca. 0.5 μm) have opened up new opportunities for the application of X-ray CT in experimental studies of root and soil interactions. Conclusions We conclude that CT is well placed to contribute significantly to unravelling the complex interactions between roots and soil.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0032-079X
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0032-079X
  • 1573-5036
url: Link


@attributes
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
RANK2.7289865
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourceidgale_opena
recordidTN_cdi_proquest_miscellaneous_968173645
sourceformatXML
sourcesystemPC
galeidA362063950
jstor_id24369076
sourcerecordidA362063950
originalsourceidFETCH-LOGICAL-1547t-f3142393f7ff5002af9a0ffdcad82a01ea6f601286ff66926660d25c38d07b830
addsrcrecordideNp9UU1r3DAUNKWFbrf9AT0URKH05PRJsqXVMSTpBwR6SSE38VaWNlpsyZW0gf330eKQQA5BB6HHzLwZTdN8pnBGAeSPTCmFrgVKWwpctepNs6K95G0PXLxtVgCctSDV7fvmQ857OL2pWDXbS3tvxzj7sCO3bcIjuYjTfCh2IDdxiruE892RlEhCDK0P95h9xR-Jn3BnCW8vSYqxkHzMxU6ZYDJ3vlhTDskSH0iOfvzYvHM4Zvvp8V43_35e3Vz8bq___vpzcX7d0r6TpXWcdowr7qRzPQBDpxCcGwwOG4ZALQongLKNcE4IxYQQMLDe8M0AcrvhsG6uFt0424A-WT2najMddUSvh2CLtslo2m-AsW2PHHo0YgBmebeVfNhacEZi1fm-6Mwp_j_YXPTks7HjiMHGQ9ZKbKjkousr8usL5D4eUqghtWISap5eVdDZAtrhaLUPLpaEpp7BTt7EYJ2v83MuGAiuavJ1QxeCSTHnZN1TDgr6VLZeyta1bH0qW5-WfHt0gtng6BIG4_MTkfUCOqZOfyRfaBtfsPgYqik_vrqBLcxcRcPOpuesr5G-LKR9LjE92-m4UCAFPACqoNK0
sourcetypeOpen Access Repository
isCDItrue
recordtypearticle
pqid927014259
display
typearticle
titleDeveloping X-ray Computed Tomography to non-invasively image 3-D root systems architecture in soil
creatorMooney, S. J ; Pridmore, T. P ; Helliwell, J ; Bennett, M. J
creatorcontribMooney, S. J ; Pridmore, T. P ; Helliwell, J ; Bennett, M. J
descriptionBackground The need to observe roots in their natural undisturbed state within soil, both spatially and temporally, is a challenge that continues to occupy researchers studying the rhizosphere. Scope This paper reviews how over the last 30 years the application of X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) has demonstrated considerable promise for root visualisation studies. We describe how early CT work demonstrated that roots could be visualised within soils, but was limited by resolution (ca. 1 mm). Subsequent work, utilising newer micro CT scanners, has been able to achieve higher resolutions (ca. 50 μm) and enhance imaging capability in terms of detecting finer root material. However the overlap in the attenuation density of root material and soil pore space has been a major impediment to the uptake of the technology. We then outline how sophisticated image processing techniques, frequently based on object tracking methods, have demonstrated great promise in overcoming these obstacles. This, along with the concurrent advances in scan and reconstruction times, image quality and resolution (ca. 0.5 μm) have opened up new opportunities for the application of X-ray CT in experimental studies of root and soil interactions. Conclusions We conclude that CT is well placed to contribute significantly to unravelling the complex interactions between roots and soil.
identifier
0ISSN: 0032-079X
1EISSN: 1573-5036
2DOI: 10.1007/s11104-011-1039-9
3CODEN: PLSOA2
languageeng
publisherDordrecht: Springer
subjectAgronomy. Soil science and plant productions ; Animal, plant and microbial ecology ; Architecture ; Biological and medical sciences ; Biomedical and Life Sciences ; Botanical research ; Computerized axial tomography ; CT imaging ; Ecology ; Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology ; General agronomy. Plant production ; Life Sciences ; MARSCHNER REVIEW ; Methods ; Physiological aspects ; Plant ecology ; Plant growth ; Plant Physiology ; Plant roots ; Plant Sciences ; Plant-soil relationships ; Plants ; Root systems ; Roots (Botany) ; Sandy loam soils ; Soil fertility ; Soil pollution ; Soil samples ; Soil science ; Soil Science & Conservation ; Soil water ; Soil-plant relationships. Soil fertility ; Soil-plant relationships. Soil fertility. Fertilization. Amendments ; Tomography
ispartofPlant and Soil, 2012, Vol.352 (1-2), p.1-22
rights
0Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011
12015 INIST-CNRS
2COPYRIGHT 2012 Springer
3Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012
lds50peer_reviewed
oafree_for_read
citedbyFETCH-LOGICAL-1547t-f3142393f7ff5002af9a0ffdcad82a01ea6f601286ff66926660d25c38d07b830
citesFETCH-LOGICAL-1547t-f3142393f7ff5002af9a0ffdcad82a01ea6f601286ff66926660d25c38d07b830
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
thumbnail$$Usyndetics_thumb_exl
backlink$$Uhttp://pascal-francis.inist.fr/vibad/index.php?action=getRecordDetail&idt=25604293$$DView record in Pascal Francis
search
creatorcontrib
0Mooney, S. J
1Pridmore, T. P
2Helliwell, J
3Bennett, M. J
title
0Developing X-ray Computed Tomography to non-invasively image 3-D root systems architecture in soil
1Plant and Soil
addtitlePlant Soil
descriptionBackground The need to observe roots in their natural undisturbed state within soil, both spatially and temporally, is a challenge that continues to occupy researchers studying the rhizosphere. Scope This paper reviews how over the last 30 years the application of X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) has demonstrated considerable promise for root visualisation studies. We describe how early CT work demonstrated that roots could be visualised within soils, but was limited by resolution (ca. 1 mm). Subsequent work, utilising newer micro CT scanners, has been able to achieve higher resolutions (ca. 50 μm) and enhance imaging capability in terms of detecting finer root material. However the overlap in the attenuation density of root material and soil pore space has been a major impediment to the uptake of the technology. We then outline how sophisticated image processing techniques, frequently based on object tracking methods, have demonstrated great promise in overcoming these obstacles. This, along with the concurrent advances in scan and reconstruction times, image quality and resolution (ca. 0.5 μm) have opened up new opportunities for the application of X-ray CT in experimental studies of root and soil interactions. Conclusions We conclude that CT is well placed to contribute significantly to unravelling the complex interactions between roots and soil.
subject
0Agronomy. Soil science and plant productions
1Animal, plant and microbial ecology
2Architecture
3Biological and medical sciences
4Biomedical and Life Sciences
5Botanical research
6Computerized axial tomography
7CT imaging
8Ecology
9Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology
10General agronomy. Plant production
11Life Sciences
12MARSCHNER REVIEW
13Methods
14Physiological aspects
15Plant ecology
16Plant growth
17Plant Physiology
18Plant roots
19Plant Sciences
20Plant-soil relationships
21Plants
22Root systems
23Roots (Botany)
24Sandy loam soils
25Soil fertility
26Soil pollution
27Soil samples
28Soil science
29Soil Science & Conservation
30Soil water
31Soil-plant relationships. Soil fertility
32Soil-plant relationships. Soil fertility. Fertilization. Amendments
33Tomography
issn
00032-079X
11573-5036
fulltextfalse
rsrctypearticle
creationdate2012
recordtypearticle
recordideNp9UU1r3DAUNKWFbrf9AT0URKH05PRJsqXVMSTpBwR6SSE38VaWNlpsyZW0gf330eKQQA5BB6HHzLwZTdN8pnBGAeSPTCmFrgVKWwpctepNs6K95G0PXLxtVgCctSDV7fvmQ857OL2pWDXbS3tvxzj7sCO3bcIjuYjTfCh2IDdxiruE892RlEhCDK0P95h9xR-Jn3BnCW8vSYqxkHzMxU6ZYDJ3vlhTDskSH0iOfvzYvHM4Zvvp8V43_35e3Vz8bq___vpzcX7d0r6TpXWcdowr7qRzPQBDpxCcGwwOG4ZALQongLKNcE4IxYQQMLDe8M0AcrvhsG6uFt0424A-WT2najMddUSvh2CLtslo2m-AsW2PHHo0YgBmebeVfNhacEZi1fm-6Mwp_j_YXPTks7HjiMHGQ9ZKbKjkousr8usL5D4eUqghtWISap5eVdDZAtrhaLUPLpaEpp7BTt7EYJ2v83MuGAiuavJ1QxeCSTHnZN1TDgr6VLZeyta1bH0qW5-WfHt0gtng6BIG4_MTkfUCOqZOfyRfaBtfsPgYqik_vrqBLcxcRcPOpuesr5G-LKR9LjE92-m4UCAFPACqoNK0
startdate20120101
enddate20120101
creator
0Mooney, S. J
1Pridmore, T. P
2Helliwell, J
3Bennett, M. J
general
0Springer
1Springer Netherlands
2Springer Nature B.V
scope
0IQODW
1AAYXX
2CITATION
33V.
47SN
57ST
67T7
77X2
888A
98FD
108FE
118FH
128FK
13ABUWG
14ATCPS
15AZQEC
16BBNVY
17BENPR
18BHPHI
19C1K
20DWQXO
21FR3
22GNUQQ
23HCIFZ
24LK8
25M0K
26M7P
27P64
28PQEST
29PQQKQ
30PQUKI
31PRINS
32RC3
33SOI
34BOBZL
35CLFQK
sort
creationdate20120101
titleDeveloping X-ray Computed Tomography to non-invasively image 3-D root systems architecture in soil
authorMooney, S. J ; Pridmore, T. P ; Helliwell, J ; Bennett, M. J
facets
frbrtype5
frbrgroupidcdi_FETCH-LOGICAL-1547t-f3142393f7ff5002af9a0ffdcad82a01ea6f601286ff66926660d25c38d07b830
rsrctypearticles
prefilterarticles
languageeng
creationdate2012
topic
0Agronomy. Soil science and plant productions
1Animal, plant and microbial ecology
2Architecture
3Biological and medical sciences
4Biomedical and Life Sciences
5Botanical research
6Computerized axial tomography
7CT imaging
8Ecology
9Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology
10General agronomy. Plant production
11Life Sciences
12MARSCHNER REVIEW
13Methods
14Physiological aspects
15Plant ecology
16Plant growth
17Plant Physiology
18Plant roots
19Plant Sciences
20Plant-soil relationships
21Plants
22Root systems
23Roots (Botany)
24Sandy loam soils
25Soil fertility
26Soil pollution
27Soil samples
28Soil science
29Soil Science & Conservation
30Soil water
31Soil-plant relationships. Soil fertility
32Soil-plant relationships. Soil fertility. Fertilization. Amendments
33Tomography
toplevelpeer_reviewed
creatorcontrib
0Mooney, S. J
1Pridmore, T. P
2Helliwell, J
3Bennett, M. J
collection
0Pascal-Francis
1CrossRef
2ProQuest Central (Corporate)
3Ecology Abstracts
4Environment Abstracts
5Industrial and Applied Microbiology Abstracts (Microbiology A)
6Agricultural Science Collection
7Biology Database (Alumni Edition)
8Technology Research Database
9ProQuest SciTech Collection
10ProQuest Natural Science Collection
11ProQuest Central (Alumni) (purchase pre-March 2016)
12ProQuest Central (Alumni Edition)
13Agricultural & Environmental Science Collection
14ProQuest Central Essentials
15Biological Science Collection
16ProQuest Central
17Natural Science Collection
18Environmental Sciences and Pollution Management
19ProQuest Central Korea
20Engineering Research Database
21ProQuest Central Student
22SciTech Premium Collection
23ProQuest Biological Science Collection
24Agricultural Science Database
25Biological Science Database
26Biotechnology and BioEngineering Abstracts
27ProQuest One Academic Eastern Edition
28ProQuest One Academic
29ProQuest One Academic UKI Edition
30ProQuest Central China
31Genetics Abstracts
32Environment Abstracts
33OpenAIRE (Open Access)
34OpenAIRE
jtitlePlant and Soil
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextno_fulltext
addata
au
0Mooney, S. J
1Pridmore, T. P
2Helliwell, J
3Bennett, M. J
formatjournal
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
atitleDeveloping X-ray Computed Tomography to non-invasively image 3-D root systems architecture in soil
jtitlePlant and Soil
stitlePlant Soil
date2012-01-01
risdate2012
volume352
issue1-2
spage1
epage22
pages1-22
issn0032-079X
eissn1573-5036
codenPLSOA2
abstractBackground The need to observe roots in their natural undisturbed state within soil, both spatially and temporally, is a challenge that continues to occupy researchers studying the rhizosphere. Scope This paper reviews how over the last 30 years the application of X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) has demonstrated considerable promise for root visualisation studies. We describe how early CT work demonstrated that roots could be visualised within soils, but was limited by resolution (ca. 1 mm). Subsequent work, utilising newer micro CT scanners, has been able to achieve higher resolutions (ca. 50 μm) and enhance imaging capability in terms of detecting finer root material. However the overlap in the attenuation density of root material and soil pore space has been a major impediment to the uptake of the technology. We then outline how sophisticated image processing techniques, frequently based on object tracking methods, have demonstrated great promise in overcoming these obstacles. This, along with the concurrent advances in scan and reconstruction times, image quality and resolution (ca. 0.5 μm) have opened up new opportunities for the application of X-ray CT in experimental studies of root and soil interactions. Conclusions We conclude that CT is well placed to contribute significantly to unravelling the complex interactions between roots and soil.
copDordrecht
pubSpringer
doi10.1007/s11104-011-1039-9
oafree_for_read