schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

A Masters in Collaboration

Another approach - my general strategy, in fact - is to sound out my idea first with people who advise the person I'm trying to influence. I find out who the decision-makers talk to when making decisions. That's difficult with one or two of my colleagues because they don't talk to anyone; I just hav... Full description

Journal Title: CIO Canada 2007-10-01, Vol.15 (9), p.N_A
Main Author: Gerry McCartney
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: Downsview: Laurentian Technomedia Inc
ID: ISSN: 1195-6097
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: cdi_proquest_reports_217450251
title: A Masters in Collaboration
format: Article
creator:
  • Gerry McCartney
subjects:
  • Chief information officers
  • Colleges & universities
  • Decision making
  • Executives
  • Information technology
  • Leadership
  • School administration
  • Wireless networks
ispartof: CIO Canada, 2007-10-01, Vol.15 (9), p.N_A
description: Another approach - my general strategy, in fact - is to sound out my idea first with people who advise the person I'm trying to influence. I find out who the decision-makers talk to when making decisions. That's difficult with one or two of my colleagues because they don't talk to anyone; I just have to go pitch to them But most people, when you pitch them something pretty big, will have a couple of people they talk to about it. So my first pitch is to those "sounding board" people. I don't ask them to bring my idea up with the decision-maker themselves; I say "What do you think so and so would think about an idea like this." I'll listen to how they poke at it, and from those conversations I'll determine whether I'm good to go. Or I might glean that I need to tweak this, or not be as strong on that. Or just maybe I'll think, "Crikey, this is dead on arrival; I'm not even going to present it." If I'm really jammed, I use my silver bullet approach. I'll say to the decision-makers, "I've got to make this happen; it's really important to the University and so it's important to me. This is a big one, and I won't be back next week with another request." I will already have sounded out the people around them, and if necessary applied pressure from underneath and sometimes from above them. I want them to interpret that as "I'm going to do everything in my power to make this happen, so don't be surprised if you get a call from your boss on this." Through all of this, I keep in the forefront of my mind that collaboration is a two-way street. People want to influence us, and we have to let ourselves be open to that. That can be emotionally wearing. When we're tired our attitude can be "To heck with it, what we've got is good enough." But we've got to maintain a high energy level and enthusiasm because we're in a service provision business - people don't knock on our door and say "I just wanted to let you know that you guys are doing a great job." They are silent until something goes wrong, and then they're on our doorstep to tell us we're screwing up.
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 1195-6097
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 1195-6097
url: Link


@attributes
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
RANK1.5240799
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourceidproquest
recordidTN_cdi_proquest_reports_217450251
sourceformatXML
sourcesystemPC
sourcerecordid1386306861
originalsourceidFETCH-proquest_reports_2174502513
addsrcrecordideNpjYeA0NLQ01TUzsDTnYOAqLs4yMDAwNjE05GSQclTwTSwuSS0qVsjMU3DOz8lJTMovSizJzM_jYWBNS8wpTuWF0twMim6uIc4eugVF-YWlqcUl8UWpBflFJcXxRobmJqYGRqaGxsSoAQCfhii6
sourcetypeAggregation Database
isCDItrue
recordtypearticle
pqid217450251
display
typearticle
titleA Masters in Collaboration
sourceAlma/SFX Local Collection
creatorGerry McCartney
creatorcontribGerry McCartney
descriptionAnother approach - my general strategy, in fact - is to sound out my idea first with people who advise the person I'm trying to influence. I find out who the decision-makers talk to when making decisions. That's difficult with one or two of my colleagues because they don't talk to anyone; I just have to go pitch to them But most people, when you pitch them something pretty big, will have a couple of people they talk to about it. So my first pitch is to those "sounding board" people. I don't ask them to bring my idea up with the decision-maker themselves; I say "What do you think so and so would think about an idea like this." I'll listen to how they poke at it, and from those conversations I'll determine whether I'm good to go. Or I might glean that I need to tweak this, or not be as strong on that. Or just maybe I'll think, "Crikey, this is dead on arrival; I'm not even going to present it." If I'm really jammed, I use my silver bullet approach. I'll say to the decision-makers, "I've got to make this happen; it's really important to the University and so it's important to me. This is a big one, and I won't be back next week with another request." I will already have sounded out the people around them, and if necessary applied pressure from underneath and sometimes from above them. I want them to interpret that as "I'm going to do everything in my power to make this happen, so don't be surprised if you get a call from your boss on this." Through all of this, I keep in the forefront of my mind that collaboration is a two-way street. People want to influence us, and we have to let ourselves be open to that. That can be emotionally wearing. When we're tired our attitude can be "To heck with it, what we've got is good enough." But we've got to maintain a high energy level and enthusiasm because we're in a service provision business - people don't knock on our door and say "I just wanted to let you know that you guys are doing a great job." They are silent until something goes wrong, and then they're on our doorstep to tell us we're screwing up.
identifierISSN: 1195-6097
languageeng
publisherDownsview: Laurentian Technomedia Inc
subjectChief information officers ; Colleges & universities ; Decision making ; Executives ; Information technology ; Leadership ; School administration ; Wireless networks
ispartofCIO Canada, 2007-10-01, Vol.15 (9), p.N_A
rightsCopyright Laurentian Technomedia Inc. Oct 2007
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
openurlfulltext$$Topenurlfull_article
thumbnail$$Usyndetics_thumb_exl
search
creatorcontribGerry McCartney
title
0A Masters in Collaboration
1CIO Canada
descriptionAnother approach - my general strategy, in fact - is to sound out my idea first with people who advise the person I'm trying to influence. I find out who the decision-makers talk to when making decisions. That's difficult with one or two of my colleagues because they don't talk to anyone; I just have to go pitch to them But most people, when you pitch them something pretty big, will have a couple of people they talk to about it. So my first pitch is to those "sounding board" people. I don't ask them to bring my idea up with the decision-maker themselves; I say "What do you think so and so would think about an idea like this." I'll listen to how they poke at it, and from those conversations I'll determine whether I'm good to go. Or I might glean that I need to tweak this, or not be as strong on that. Or just maybe I'll think, "Crikey, this is dead on arrival; I'm not even going to present it." If I'm really jammed, I use my silver bullet approach. I'll say to the decision-makers, "I've got to make this happen; it's really important to the University and so it's important to me. This is a big one, and I won't be back next week with another request." I will already have sounded out the people around them, and if necessary applied pressure from underneath and sometimes from above them. I want them to interpret that as "I'm going to do everything in my power to make this happen, so don't be surprised if you get a call from your boss on this." Through all of this, I keep in the forefront of my mind that collaboration is a two-way street. People want to influence us, and we have to let ourselves be open to that. That can be emotionally wearing. When we're tired our attitude can be "To heck with it, what we've got is good enough." But we've got to maintain a high energy level and enthusiasm because we're in a service provision business - people don't knock on our door and say "I just wanted to let you know that you guys are doing a great job." They are silent until something goes wrong, and then they're on our doorstep to tell us we're screwing up.
subject
0Chief information officers
1Colleges & universities
2Decision making
3Executives
4Information technology
5Leadership
6School administration
7Wireless networks
issn1195-6097
fulltexttrue
rsrctypearticle
creationdate2007
recordtypearticle
recordideNpjYeA0NLQ01TUzsDTnYOAqLs4yMDAwNjE05GSQclTwTSwuSS0qVsjMU3DOz8lJTMovSizJzM_jYWBNS8wpTuWF0twMim6uIc4eugVF-YWlqcUl8UWpBflFJcXxRobmJqYGRqaGxsSoAQCfhii6
startdate20071001
enddate20071001
creatorGerry McCartney
generalLaurentian Technomedia Inc
scope
03V.
17WY
27XB
3883
48FE
58FG
68FK
78FL
88FQ
98FV
10ABUWG
11ARAPS
12AZQEC
13BENPR
14BEZIV
15BGLVJ
16DWQXO
17FRNLG
18GNUQQ
19HCIFZ
20JQ2
21K60
22K6~
23K7-
24L.-
25M0F
26M3D
27P5Z
28P62
29PQBIZ
30PQBZA
31PQEST
32PQQKQ
33PQUKI
34PRINS
35PYYUZ
36Q9U
sort
creationdate20071001
titleA Masters in Collaboration
authorGerry McCartney
facets
frbrtype5
frbrgroupidcdi_FETCH-proquest_reports_2174502513
rsrctypearticles
prefilterarticles
languageeng
creationdate2007
topic
0Chief information officers
1Colleges & universities
2Decision making
3Executives
4Information technology
5Leadership
6School administration
7Wireless networks
toplevelonline_resources
creatorcontribGerry McCartney
collection
0ProQuest Central (Corporate)
1ABI/INFORM Collection
2ProQuest Central (purchase pre-March 2016)
3ABI/INFORM Trade & Industry (Alumni Edition)
4ProQuest SciTech Collection
5ProQuest Technology Collection
6ProQuest Central (Alumni) (purchase pre-March 2016)
7ABI/INFORM Collection (Alumni Edition)
8Canadian Business & Current Affairs Database
9Canadian Business & Current Affairs Database (Alumni Edition)
10ProQuest Central (Alumni Edition)
11Advanced Technologies & Aerospace Collection
12ProQuest Central Essentials
13ProQuest Central
14Business Premium Collection
15Technology Collection
16ProQuest Central Korea
17Business Premium Collection (Alumni)
18ProQuest Central Student
19SciTech Premium Collection
20ProQuest Computer Science Collection
21ProQuest Business Collection (Alumni Edition)
22ProQuest Business Collection
23Computer Science Database
24ABI/INFORM Professional Advanced
25ABI/INFORM Trade & Industry
26Canadian Business & Current Affairs Database: Business
27Advanced Technologies & Aerospace Database
28ProQuest Advanced Technologies & Aerospace Collection
29ProQuest One Business
30ProQuest One Business (Alumni)
31ProQuest One Academic Eastern Edition
32ProQuest One Academic
33ProQuest One Academic UKI Edition
34ProQuest Central China
35ABI/INFORM Collection China
36ProQuest Central Basic
jtitleCIO Canada
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextfulltext
addata
auGerry McCartney
formatjournal
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
atitleA Masters in Collaboration
jtitleCIO Canada
date2007-10-01
risdate2007
volume15
issue9
spageN_A
pagesN_A-
issn1195-6097
abstractAnother approach - my general strategy, in fact - is to sound out my idea first with people who advise the person I'm trying to influence. I find out who the decision-makers talk to when making decisions. That's difficult with one or two of my colleagues because they don't talk to anyone; I just have to go pitch to them But most people, when you pitch them something pretty big, will have a couple of people they talk to about it. So my first pitch is to those "sounding board" people. I don't ask them to bring my idea up with the decision-maker themselves; I say "What do you think so and so would think about an idea like this." I'll listen to how they poke at it, and from those conversations I'll determine whether I'm good to go. Or I might glean that I need to tweak this, or not be as strong on that. Or just maybe I'll think, "Crikey, this is dead on arrival; I'm not even going to present it." If I'm really jammed, I use my silver bullet approach. I'll say to the decision-makers, "I've got to make this happen; it's really important to the University and so it's important to me. This is a big one, and I won't be back next week with another request." I will already have sounded out the people around them, and if necessary applied pressure from underneath and sometimes from above them. I want them to interpret that as "I'm going to do everything in my power to make this happen, so don't be surprised if you get a call from your boss on this." Through all of this, I keep in the forefront of my mind that collaboration is a two-way street. People want to influence us, and we have to let ourselves be open to that. That can be emotionally wearing. When we're tired our attitude can be "To heck with it, what we've got is good enough." But we've got to maintain a high energy level and enthusiasm because we're in a service provision business - people don't knock on our door and say "I just wanted to let you know that you guys are doing a great job." They are silent until something goes wrong, and then they're on our doorstep to tell us we're screwing up.
copDownsview
pubLaurentian Technomedia Inc