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Prevalence and predictors of failure to return for HIV-1 post-test counseling in the era of antiretroviral therapy in rural Kilimanjaro, Tanzania: challenges and opportunities

In this era of antiretroviral therapy (ART) a limited number of population-based studies have investigated the extent of voluntary counseling and testing acceptance and completion in Africa. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and predictors of failure to return for HIV post-test coun... Full description

Journal Title: AIDS care 2009-02-01, Vol.21 (2), p.160-167
Main Author: Mmbaga, Elia J
Other Authors: Leyna, Germana H , Mnyika, Kagoma S , Hussain, Akhtar , Klepp, Knut-Inge
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: Abingdon: Taylor & Francis Group
ID: ISSN: 0954-0121
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recordid: cdi_pubmed_primary_19229684
title: Prevalence and predictors of failure to return for HIV-1 post-test counseling in the era of antiretroviral therapy in rural Kilimanjaro, Tanzania: challenges and opportunities
format: Article
creator:
  • Mmbaga, Elia J
  • Leyna, Germana H
  • Mnyika, Kagoma S
  • Hussain, Akhtar
  • Klepp, Knut-Inge
subjects:
  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • AIDS Serodiagnosis - psychology
  • AIDS/HIV
  • Anti-HIV Agents - therapeutic use
  • antiretroviral therapy
  • Biological and medical sciences
  • Counseling
  • Cross-Sectional Studies
  • Female
  • HIV infection
  • HIV Infections - diagnosis
  • HIV Infections - epidemiology
  • HIV Infections - psychology
  • HIV-1
  • Human viral diseases
  • Humans
  • Infectious diseases
  • Male
  • Medical sciences
  • Mental health
  • post-test counseling
  • Prevalence
  • Prevention. Health policy. Planification
  • Psychology. Psychoanalysis. Psychiatry
  • Psychopathology. Psychiatry
  • Rural Health
  • rural Tanzania
  • sexual risk behaviors
  • Social psychiatry. Ethnopsychiatry
  • Tanzania - epidemiology
  • Treatment Refusal - psychology
  • Viral diseases
  • Viral diseases of the lymphoid tissue and the blood. Aids
  • Young Adult
ispartof: AIDS care, 2009-02-01, Vol.21 (2), p.160-167
description: In this era of antiretroviral therapy (ART) a limited number of population-based studies have investigated the extent of voluntary counseling and testing acceptance and completion in Africa. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and predictors of failure to return for HIV post-test counseling (PTC) among adults in rural Kilimanjaro, Tanzania. Following a cross-sectional survey, people aged 15-44 years living in Oria village were interviewed and offered individual HIV-1 pre-test counseling. They were asked to return for PTC two weeks after blood sample collection. HIV-1 testing was accepted by 1491 (97.6%) of participants with 98.9% expressing desire to know their results. The proportion of individuals who did not return for PTC was 50.9%. These proportions did not differ by sex. Seropositive HIV result (AOR: 2.2; 95%CI: 1.3-4.3 for women and AOR: 2.1, 95%CI: 1.2-5.7 for men), low HIV/AIDS-transmission and ART availability knowledge, perceived low risk of HIV infection, not accepting to share results (men only) and inability to self-prevent HIV infection (women only) predicted failure to return for PTC. Additionally, participants were more likely not to return for PTC if they had no-formal education or reported recent sexual-risk behaviors, for both sexes. Age, prior HIV testing or AIDS-related clinical symptoms were not associated with return for PTC in this population. These findings suggest that low returns for PTC, especially for HIV-seropositive individuals, result in a substantial missed opportunity for prevention and care. Knowledge of ART accessibility is necessary but not sufficient to promote adequate return for PTC. The high attendance for pre-test counseling should be utilized to identify potential individuals who may not return for PTC and to promote risk reduction and care.
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 0954-0121
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0954-0121
  • 1360-0451
url: Link


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titlePrevalence and predictors of failure to return for HIV-1 post-test counseling in the era of antiretroviral therapy in rural Kilimanjaro, Tanzania: challenges and opportunities
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descriptionIn this era of antiretroviral therapy (ART) a limited number of population-based studies have investigated the extent of voluntary counseling and testing acceptance and completion in Africa. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and predictors of failure to return for HIV post-test counseling (PTC) among adults in rural Kilimanjaro, Tanzania. Following a cross-sectional survey, people aged 15-44 years living in Oria village were interviewed and offered individual HIV-1 pre-test counseling. They were asked to return for PTC two weeks after blood sample collection. HIV-1 testing was accepted by 1491 (97.6%) of participants with 98.9% expressing desire to know their results. The proportion of individuals who did not return for PTC was 50.9%. These proportions did not differ by sex. Seropositive HIV result (AOR: 2.2; 95%CI: 1.3-4.3 for women and AOR: 2.1, 95%CI: 1.2-5.7 for men), low HIV/AIDS-transmission and ART availability knowledge, perceived low risk of HIV infection, not accepting to share results (men only) and inability to self-prevent HIV infection (women only) predicted failure to return for PTC. Additionally, participants were more likely not to return for PTC if they had no-formal education or reported recent sexual-risk behaviors, for both sexes. Age, prior HIV testing or AIDS-related clinical symptoms were not associated with return for PTC in this population. These findings suggest that low returns for PTC, especially for HIV-seropositive individuals, result in a substantial missed opportunity for prevention and care. Knowledge of ART accessibility is necessary but not sufficient to promote adequate return for PTC. The high attendance for pre-test counseling should be utilized to identify potential individuals who may not return for PTC and to promote risk reduction and care.
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subjectAdolescent ; Adult ; AIDS Serodiagnosis - psychology ; AIDS/HIV ; Anti-HIV Agents - therapeutic use ; antiretroviral therapy ; Biological and medical sciences ; Counseling ; Cross-Sectional Studies ; Female ; HIV infection ; HIV Infections - diagnosis ; HIV Infections - epidemiology ; HIV Infections - psychology ; HIV-1 ; Human viral diseases ; Humans ; Infectious diseases ; Male ; Medical sciences ; Mental health ; post-test counseling ; Prevalence ; Prevention. Health policy. Planification ; Psychology. Psychoanalysis. Psychiatry ; Psychopathology. Psychiatry ; Rural Health ; rural Tanzania ; sexual risk behaviors ; Social psychiatry. Ethnopsychiatry ; Tanzania - epidemiology ; Treatment Refusal - psychology ; Viral diseases ; Viral diseases of the lymphoid tissue and the blood. Aids ; Young Adult
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descriptionIn this era of antiretroviral therapy (ART) a limited number of population-based studies have investigated the extent of voluntary counseling and testing acceptance and completion in Africa. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and predictors of failure to return for HIV post-test counseling (PTC) among adults in rural Kilimanjaro, Tanzania. Following a cross-sectional survey, people aged 15-44 years living in Oria village were interviewed and offered individual HIV-1 pre-test counseling. They were asked to return for PTC two weeks after blood sample collection. HIV-1 testing was accepted by 1491 (97.6%) of participants with 98.9% expressing desire to know their results. The proportion of individuals who did not return for PTC was 50.9%. These proportions did not differ by sex. Seropositive HIV result (AOR: 2.2; 95%CI: 1.3-4.3 for women and AOR: 2.1, 95%CI: 1.2-5.7 for men), low HIV/AIDS-transmission and ART availability knowledge, perceived low risk of HIV infection, not accepting to share results (men only) and inability to self-prevent HIV infection (women only) predicted failure to return for PTC. Additionally, participants were more likely not to return for PTC if they had no-formal education or reported recent sexual-risk behaviors, for both sexes. Age, prior HIV testing or AIDS-related clinical symptoms were not associated with return for PTC in this population. These findings suggest that low returns for PTC, especially for HIV-seropositive individuals, result in a substantial missed opportunity for prevention and care. Knowledge of ART accessibility is necessary but not sufficient to promote adequate return for PTC. The high attendance for pre-test counseling should be utilized to identify potential individuals who may not return for PTC and to promote risk reduction and care.
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titlePrevalence and predictors of failure to return for HIV-1 post-test counseling in the era of antiretroviral therapy in rural Kilimanjaro, Tanzania: challenges and opportunities
authorMmbaga, Elia J ; Leyna, Germana H ; Mnyika, Kagoma S ; Hussain, Akhtar ; Klepp, Knut-Inge
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abstractIn this era of antiretroviral therapy (ART) a limited number of population-based studies have investigated the extent of voluntary counseling and testing acceptance and completion in Africa. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and predictors of failure to return for HIV post-test counseling (PTC) among adults in rural Kilimanjaro, Tanzania. Following a cross-sectional survey, people aged 15-44 years living in Oria village were interviewed and offered individual HIV-1 pre-test counseling. They were asked to return for PTC two weeks after blood sample collection. HIV-1 testing was accepted by 1491 (97.6%) of participants with 98.9% expressing desire to know their results. The proportion of individuals who did not return for PTC was 50.9%. These proportions did not differ by sex. Seropositive HIV result (AOR: 2.2; 95%CI: 1.3-4.3 for women and AOR: 2.1, 95%CI: 1.2-5.7 for men), low HIV/AIDS-transmission and ART availability knowledge, perceived low risk of HIV infection, not accepting to share results (men only) and inability to self-prevent HIV infection (women only) predicted failure to return for PTC. Additionally, participants were more likely not to return for PTC if they had no-formal education or reported recent sexual-risk behaviors, for both sexes. Age, prior HIV testing or AIDS-related clinical symptoms were not associated with return for PTC in this population. These findings suggest that low returns for PTC, especially for HIV-seropositive individuals, result in a substantial missed opportunity for prevention and care. Knowledge of ART accessibility is necessary but not sufficient to promote adequate return for PTC. The high attendance for pre-test counseling should be utilized to identify potential individuals who may not return for PTC and to promote risk reduction and care.
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pubTaylor & Francis Group
pmid19229684
doi10.1080/09540120801982905