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The Evolutionary Roots of Human Decision Making

Humans exhibit a suite of biases when making economic decisions. We review recent research on the origins of human decision making by examining whether similar choice biases are seen in nonhuman primates, our closest phylogenetic relatives. We propose that comparative studies can provide insight int... Full description

Journal Title: Annual review of psychology 2015-01-03, Vol.66 (1), p.321-347
Main Author: Santos, Laurie R
Other Authors: Rosati, Alexandra G
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: United States: Annual Reviews
ID: ISSN: 0066-4308
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25559115
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title: The Evolutionary Roots of Human Decision Making
format: Article
creator:
  • Santos, Laurie R
  • Rosati, Alexandra G
subjects:
  • Animals
  • Article
  • beverages
  • Bias
  • Biological Evolution
  • cognitive evolution
  • Comparative studies
  • Decision making
  • Decision Making - physiology
  • Evolution
  • food
  • Human subjects
  • Humans
  • Phylogenetics
  • preference
  • Primates
  • Primates - physiology
  • rationality
ispartof: Annual review of psychology, 2015-01-03, Vol.66 (1), p.321-347
description: Humans exhibit a suite of biases when making economic decisions. We review recent research on the origins of human decision making by examining whether similar choice biases are seen in nonhuman primates, our closest phylogenetic relatives. We propose that comparative studies can provide insight into four major questions about the nature of human choice biases that cannot be addressed by studies of our species alone. First, research with other primates can address the evolution of human choice biases and identify shared versus human-unique tendencies in decision making. Second, primate studies can constrain hypotheses about the psychological mechanisms underlying such biases. Third, comparisons of closely related species can identify when distinct mechanisms underlie related biases by examining evolutionary dissociations in choice strategies. Finally, comparative work can provide insight into the biological rationality of economically irrational preferences.
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 0066-4308
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0066-4308
  • 1545-2085
url: Link


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descriptionHumans exhibit a suite of biases when making economic decisions. We review recent research on the origins of human decision making by examining whether similar choice biases are seen in nonhuman primates, our closest phylogenetic relatives. We propose that comparative studies can provide insight into four major questions about the nature of human choice biases that cannot be addressed by studies of our species alone. First, research with other primates can address the evolution of human choice biases and identify shared versus human-unique tendencies in decision making. Second, primate studies can constrain hypotheses about the psychological mechanisms underlying such biases. Third, comparisons of closely related species can identify when distinct mechanisms underlie related biases by examining evolutionary dissociations in choice strategies. Finally, comparative work can provide insight into the biological rationality of economically irrational preferences.
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abstractHumans exhibit a suite of biases when making economic decisions. We review recent research on the origins of human decision making by examining whether similar choice biases are seen in nonhuman primates, our closest phylogenetic relatives. We propose that comparative studies can provide insight into four major questions about the nature of human choice biases that cannot be addressed by studies of our species alone. First, research with other primates can address the evolution of human choice biases and identify shared versus human-unique tendencies in decision making. Second, primate studies can constrain hypotheses about the psychological mechanisms underlying such biases. Third, comparisons of closely related species can identify when distinct mechanisms underlie related biases by examining evolutionary dissociations in choice strategies. Finally, comparative work can provide insight into the biological rationality of economically irrational preferences.
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