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Multilevel influences on acceptance of medical male circumcision in Rakai District, Uganda

Despite access to safe medical male circumcision (MMC) and proven effectiveness of the procedure in reducing acquisition of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections, uptake remains suboptimal in many settings in sub-Saharan Africa, including Rakai District, Uganda. This study explored multileve... Full description

Journal Title: AIDS care 2017, Vol.29 (8), p.1049-1055
Main Author: Lilleston, Pamela S.
Other Authors: Marcell, Arik V. , Nakyanjo, Neema , Leonard, Lori , Wawer, Maria J.
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
HIV
STD
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: England: Taylor & Francis
ID: ISSN: 0954-0121
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28278564
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recordid: cdi_pubmed_primary_28278564
title: Multilevel influences on acceptance of medical male circumcision in Rakai District, Uganda
format: Article
creator:
  • Lilleston, Pamela S.
  • Marcell, Arik V.
  • Nakyanjo, Neema
  • Leonard, Lori
  • Wawer, Maria J.
subjects:
  • Access
  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • AIDS/HIV
  • Circumcision
  • Circumcision, Male - psychology
  • Cost engineering
  • Costs
  • Data processing
  • Disease transmission
  • Economic impact
  • Economics
  • Facilitators
  • Female
  • Females
  • Focus Groups
  • Health care
  • Health care expenditures
  • Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
  • Health risks
  • Health services
  • Helpseeking
  • HIV
  • HIV Infections - prevention & control
  • Human immunodeficiency virus
  • Humans
  • Influence
  • Interviews as Topic
  • Male
  • Males
  • Masculinity
  • Medical male circumcision
  • Middle Aged
  • Multilevel
  • Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
  • Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology
  • Qualitative Research
  • Religion
  • Reproduction
  • Reproductive health
  • Reproductive Health Services - utilization
  • Reproductive systems
  • Risk
  • Sexually transmitted diseases
  • Sexually Transmitted Diseases - prevention & control
  • sexually transmitted infections
  • Social behavior
  • STD
  • Uganda
  • Uptake
  • Young Adult
ispartof: AIDS care, 2017, Vol.29 (8), p.1049-1055
description: Despite access to safe medical male circumcision (MMC) and proven effectiveness of the procedure in reducing acquisition of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections, uptake remains suboptimal in many settings in sub-Saharan Africa, including Rakai District, Uganda. This study explored multilevel barriers and facilitators to MMC in focus group discussions (FGDs) (n = 35 groups) in Rakai. Focus groups were conducted from May through July 2012 with adolescent and adult males, with a range of HIV risk and reproductive health service use profiles, and with adolescent and adult females. Data were analyzed using Atlas.ti and an inductive approach. Participants' discussions produced several key themes representing multilevel influences that may facilitate or create barriers to uptake of MMC. These include availability of MMC services, economic costs, masculine ideals, religion, and social influence. Understanding how males and females view MMC is a crucial step towards increasing uptake of the procedure and reducing disease transmission.
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 0954-0121
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0954-0121
  • 1360-0451
url: Link


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descriptionDespite access to safe medical male circumcision (MMC) and proven effectiveness of the procedure in reducing acquisition of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections, uptake remains suboptimal in many settings in sub-Saharan Africa, including Rakai District, Uganda. This study explored multilevel barriers and facilitators to MMC in focus group discussions (FGDs) (n = 35 groups) in Rakai. Focus groups were conducted from May through July 2012 with adolescent and adult males, with a range of HIV risk and reproductive health service use profiles, and with adolescent and adult females. Data were analyzed using Atlas.ti and an inductive approach. Participants' discussions produced several key themes representing multilevel influences that may facilitate or create barriers to uptake of MMC. These include availability of MMC services, economic costs, masculine ideals, religion, and social influence. Understanding how males and females view MMC is a crucial step towards increasing uptake of the procedure and reducing disease transmission.
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subjectAccess ; Adolescent ; Adult ; AIDS/HIV ; Circumcision ; Circumcision, Male - psychology ; Cost engineering ; Costs ; Data processing ; Disease transmission ; Economic impact ; Economics ; Facilitators ; Female ; Females ; Focus Groups ; Health care ; Health care expenditures ; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice ; Health risks ; Health services ; Helpseeking ; HIV ; HIV Infections - prevention & control ; Human immunodeficiency virus ; Humans ; Influence ; Interviews as Topic ; Male ; Males ; Masculinity ; Medical male circumcision ; Middle Aged ; Multilevel ; Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology ; Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology ; Qualitative Research ; Religion ; Reproduction ; Reproductive health ; Reproductive Health Services - utilization ; Reproductive systems ; Risk ; Sexually transmitted diseases ; Sexually Transmitted Diseases - prevention & control ; sexually transmitted infections ; Social behavior ; STD ; Uganda ; Uptake ; Young Adult
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37Religion
38Reproduction
39Reproductive health
40Reproductive Health Services - utilization
41Reproductive systems
42Risk
43Sexually transmitted diseases
44Sexually Transmitted Diseases - prevention & control
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pages1049-1055
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abstractDespite access to safe medical male circumcision (MMC) and proven effectiveness of the procedure in reducing acquisition of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections, uptake remains suboptimal in many settings in sub-Saharan Africa, including Rakai District, Uganda. This study explored multilevel barriers and facilitators to MMC in focus group discussions (FGDs) (n = 35 groups) in Rakai. Focus groups were conducted from May through July 2012 with adolescent and adult males, with a range of HIV risk and reproductive health service use profiles, and with adolescent and adult females. Data were analyzed using Atlas.ti and an inductive approach. Participants' discussions produced several key themes representing multilevel influences that may facilitate or create barriers to uptake of MMC. These include availability of MMC services, economic costs, masculine ideals, religion, and social influence. Understanding how males and females view MMC is a crucial step towards increasing uptake of the procedure and reducing disease transmission.
copEngland
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pmid28278564
doi10.1080/09540121.2016.1274014