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Alcohol consumption, diet, coronary risk factors, and prevalent coronary heart disease in men and women in the Scottish heart health study

STUDY OBJECTIVE--To measure the relationship between reported alcohol consumption and prevalent diagnosed and undiagnosed coronary heart disease (CHD) in men and women to see how much could be explained by covariation with diet, lifestyle, and biomedical factors. DESIGN AND SETTING--This was a cross... Full description

Journal Title: Journal of epidemiology and community health (1979) 1995, Vol.49 (4), p.354-362
Main Author: Woodward, M
Other Authors: Tunstall-Pedoe, H
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Men
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: London: BMJ Publishing Group Ltd
ID: ISSN: 0143-005X
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recordid: cdi_pubmedcentral_primary_oai_pubmedcentral_nih_gov_1060122
title: Alcohol consumption, diet, coronary risk factors, and prevalent coronary heart disease in men and women in the Scottish heart health study
format: Article
creator:
  • Woodward, M
  • Tunstall-Pedoe, H
subjects:
  • Adult
  • Age Factors
  • Alcohol Drinking
  • Alcohol related disorders
  • Alcoholic beverages
  • Alcohols
  • Biological and medical sciences
  • Cardiology. Vascular system
  • Cholesterol - blood
  • Cholesterols
  • Congenital heart defects
  • Coronary artery disease
  • Coronary Disease - epidemiology
  • Coronary Disease - etiology
  • Coronary heart disease
  • Cross-Sectional Studies
  • Diet
  • Epidemiology
  • Female
  • Heart
  • Humans
  • Life Style
  • Lifestyle
  • Male
  • Medical sciences
  • Men
  • Middle Aged
  • Predisposing factors
  • Research Article
  • Risk Factors
  • Scotland - epidemiology
  • Sex Factors
  • Smoking
ispartof: Journal of epidemiology and community health (1979), 1995, Vol.49 (4), p.354-362
description: STUDY OBJECTIVE--To measure the relationship between reported alcohol consumption and prevalent diagnosed and undiagnosed coronary heart disease (CHD) in men and women to see how much could be explained by covariation with diet, lifestyle, and biomedical factors. DESIGN AND SETTING--This was a cross sectional, random population survey covering 22 districts of Scotland and using general practitioner patient lists as the sampling frame. Odds ratios for prevalent CHD at different levels of alcohol consumption taken from a seven day recall were analysed. These ratios were then adjusted for lifestyle and biomedical factors. PARTICIPANTS--Male and female responders aged 40-59 years who completed the survey questionnaire and attended the survey clinic. MAIN RESULTS--The participation rate of those invited was 74%. Of the 10,359 responders, 658 were excluded because of missing alcohol data or ambiguous cardiovascular status. The questionnaire was used to designate 7058 drinkers and 2643 non-drinkers, who were then classified as having diagnosed or undiagnosed CHD, or who were controls. The prevalence of diagnosed CHD decreased with increasing alcohol consumption while undiagnosed CHD had a "U" shaped relationship. Patterns were similar in men and women if allowance was made for the lower alcohol consumption in women. Adjustment for several diet and lifestyle factors and for additional biomedical factors reduced the apparent protective effect of alcohol, leaving a modest but statistically insignificant (p > 0.05) reduction in CHD prevalence among light to moderate consumers compared with those who drank no alcohol. Wine drinkers seemed to be at lower risk than beer drinkers in both sexes. CONCLUSIONS--These results tend to confirm that intermediate alcohol consumption is a component and contributor to a low coronary risk lifestyle. Its effects are largely explained by adjusting for both confounding lifestyle associations and for biomedical effects but the remaining effect, and the lower risk with wine drinking compared with beer, are intriguing. Advice on alcohol habits should not be determined solely by the moderate apparent benefit to risk of CHD, however, as other disease risks cannot be ignored.
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 0143-005X
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0143-005X
  • 1470-2738
url: Link


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descriptionSTUDY OBJECTIVE--To measure the relationship between reported alcohol consumption and prevalent diagnosed and undiagnosed coronary heart disease (CHD) in men and women to see how much could be explained by covariation with diet, lifestyle, and biomedical factors. DESIGN AND SETTING--This was a cross sectional, random population survey covering 22 districts of Scotland and using general practitioner patient lists as the sampling frame. Odds ratios for prevalent CHD at different levels of alcohol consumption taken from a seven day recall were analysed. These ratios were then adjusted for lifestyle and biomedical factors. PARTICIPANTS--Male and female responders aged 40-59 years who completed the survey questionnaire and attended the survey clinic. MAIN RESULTS--The participation rate of those invited was 74%. Of the 10,359 responders, 658 were excluded because of missing alcohol data or ambiguous cardiovascular status. The questionnaire was used to designate 7058 drinkers and 2643 non-drinkers, who were then classified as having diagnosed or undiagnosed CHD, or who were controls. The prevalence of diagnosed CHD decreased with increasing alcohol consumption while undiagnosed CHD had a "U" shaped relationship. Patterns were similar in men and women if allowance was made for the lower alcohol consumption in women. Adjustment for several diet and lifestyle factors and for additional biomedical factors reduced the apparent protective effect of alcohol, leaving a modest but statistically insignificant (p > 0.05) reduction in CHD prevalence among light to moderate consumers compared with those who drank no alcohol. Wine drinkers seemed to be at lower risk than beer drinkers in both sexes. CONCLUSIONS--These results tend to confirm that intermediate alcohol consumption is a component and contributor to a low coronary risk lifestyle. Its effects are largely explained by adjusting for both confounding lifestyle associations and for biomedical effects but the remaining effect, and the lower risk with wine drinking compared with beer, are intriguing. Advice on alcohol habits should not be determined solely by the moderate apparent benefit to risk of CHD, however, as other disease risks cannot be ignored.
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subjectAdult ; Age Factors ; Alcohol Drinking ; Alcohol related disorders ; Alcoholic beverages ; Alcohols ; Biological and medical sciences ; Cardiology. Vascular system ; Cholesterol - blood ; Cholesterols ; Congenital heart defects ; Coronary artery disease ; Coronary Disease - epidemiology ; Coronary Disease - etiology ; Coronary heart disease ; Cross-Sectional Studies ; Diet ; Epidemiology ; Female ; Heart ; Humans ; Life Style ; Lifestyle ; Male ; Medical sciences ; Men ; Middle Aged ; Predisposing factors ; Research Article ; Risk Factors ; Scotland - epidemiology ; Sex Factors ; Smoking
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descriptionSTUDY OBJECTIVE--To measure the relationship between reported alcohol consumption and prevalent diagnosed and undiagnosed coronary heart disease (CHD) in men and women to see how much could be explained by covariation with diet, lifestyle, and biomedical factors. DESIGN AND SETTING--This was a cross sectional, random population survey covering 22 districts of Scotland and using general practitioner patient lists as the sampling frame. Odds ratios for prevalent CHD at different levels of alcohol consumption taken from a seven day recall were analysed. These ratios were then adjusted for lifestyle and biomedical factors. PARTICIPANTS--Male and female responders aged 40-59 years who completed the survey questionnaire and attended the survey clinic. MAIN RESULTS--The participation rate of those invited was 74%. Of the 10,359 responders, 658 were excluded because of missing alcohol data or ambiguous cardiovascular status. The questionnaire was used to designate 7058 drinkers and 2643 non-drinkers, who were then classified as having diagnosed or undiagnosed CHD, or who were controls. The prevalence of diagnosed CHD decreased with increasing alcohol consumption while undiagnosed CHD had a "U" shaped relationship. Patterns were similar in men and women if allowance was made for the lower alcohol consumption in women. Adjustment for several diet and lifestyle factors and for additional biomedical factors reduced the apparent protective effect of alcohol, leaving a modest but statistically insignificant (p > 0.05) reduction in CHD prevalence among light to moderate consumers compared with those who drank no alcohol. Wine drinkers seemed to be at lower risk than beer drinkers in both sexes. CONCLUSIONS--These results tend to confirm that intermediate alcohol consumption is a component and contributor to a low coronary risk lifestyle. Its effects are largely explained by adjusting for both confounding lifestyle associations and for biomedical effects but the remaining effect, and the lower risk with wine drinking compared with beer, are intriguing. Advice on alcohol habits should not be determined solely by the moderate apparent benefit to risk of CHD, however, as other disease risks cannot be ignored.
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1Age Factors
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4Alcoholic beverages
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7Cardiology. Vascular system
8Cholesterol - blood
9Cholesterols
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21Life Style
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titleAlcohol consumption, diet, coronary risk factors, and prevalent coronary heart disease in men and women in the Scottish heart health study
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abstractSTUDY OBJECTIVE--To measure the relationship between reported alcohol consumption and prevalent diagnosed and undiagnosed coronary heart disease (CHD) in men and women to see how much could be explained by covariation with diet, lifestyle, and biomedical factors. DESIGN AND SETTING--This was a cross sectional, random population survey covering 22 districts of Scotland and using general practitioner patient lists as the sampling frame. Odds ratios for prevalent CHD at different levels of alcohol consumption taken from a seven day recall were analysed. These ratios were then adjusted for lifestyle and biomedical factors. PARTICIPANTS--Male and female responders aged 40-59 years who completed the survey questionnaire and attended the survey clinic. MAIN RESULTS--The participation rate of those invited was 74%. Of the 10,359 responders, 658 were excluded because of missing alcohol data or ambiguous cardiovascular status. The questionnaire was used to designate 7058 drinkers and 2643 non-drinkers, who were then classified as having diagnosed or undiagnosed CHD, or who were controls. The prevalence of diagnosed CHD decreased with increasing alcohol consumption while undiagnosed CHD had a "U" shaped relationship. Patterns were similar in men and women if allowance was made for the lower alcohol consumption in women. Adjustment for several diet and lifestyle factors and for additional biomedical factors reduced the apparent protective effect of alcohol, leaving a modest but statistically insignificant (p > 0.05) reduction in CHD prevalence among light to moderate consumers compared with those who drank no alcohol. Wine drinkers seemed to be at lower risk than beer drinkers in both sexes. CONCLUSIONS--These results tend to confirm that intermediate alcohol consumption is a component and contributor to a low coronary risk lifestyle. Its effects are largely explained by adjusting for both confounding lifestyle associations and for biomedical effects but the remaining effect, and the lower risk with wine drinking compared with beer, are intriguing. Advice on alcohol habits should not be determined solely by the moderate apparent benefit to risk of CHD, however, as other disease risks cannot be ignored.
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