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Pacifier use and sudden infant death syndrome: results from the CESDI/SUDI case control study

OBJECTIVES To investigate the relation between pacifier use and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). DESIGN Three year population based, case control study with parental interviews for each death and four age matched controls. SETTING Five regions in England (population > 17 million). SUBJECTS 325 i... Full description

Journal Title: Archives of disease in childhood 1999-08, Vol.81 (2), p.112-116
Main Author: Fleming, Peter J
Other Authors: Blair, Peter S , Pollard, Katie , Platt, Martin Ward , Leach, Charlotte , Smith, Iain , Berry, P J , Golding, Jean
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: London: BMJ Publishing Group Ltd and Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health
ID: ISSN: 0003-9888
Link: http://pascal-francis.inist.fr/vibad/index.php?action=getRecordDetail&idt=1912164
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recordid: cdi_pubmedcentral_primary_oai_pubmedcentral_nih_gov_1718026
title: Pacifier use and sudden infant death syndrome: results from the CESDI/SUDI case control study
format: Article
creator:
  • Fleming, Peter J
  • Blair, Peter S
  • Pollard, Katie
  • Platt, Martin Ward
  • Leach, Charlotte
  • Smith, Iain
  • Berry, P J
  • Golding, Jean
subjects:
  • Anesthesia. Intensive care medicine. Transfusions. Cell therapy and gene therapy
  • Babies
  • Biological and medical sciences
  • breast feeding
  • Breastfeeding & lactation
  • Confidence intervals
  • Emergency and intensive care: neonates and children. Prematurity. Sudden death
  • Families & family life
  • Health care policy
  • Intensive care medicine
  • Medical sciences
  • Original
  • Original Articles
  • pacifiers
  • Parents & parenting
  • Physiology
  • Questionnaires
  • SIDS
  • Sleep
  • Socioeconomic factors
  • Studies
  • Sudden infant death syndrome
ispartof: Archives of disease in childhood, 1999-08, Vol.81 (2), p.112-116
description: OBJECTIVES To investigate the relation between pacifier use and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). DESIGN Three year population based, case control study with parental interviews for each death and four age matched controls. SETTING Five regions in England (population > 17 million). SUBJECTS 325 infants who had died from SIDS and 1300 control infants. RESULTS Significantly fewer SIDS infants (40%) than controls (51%) used a pacifier for the last/reference sleep (univariate odds ratio (OR), 0.62; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.46 to 0.83) and the difference increased when controlled for other factors (multivariate OR, 0.41; 95% CI, 0.22 to 0.77). However, the proportion of infants who had ever used a pacifier for day (66% SIDS v 66% controls) or night sleeps (61% SIDS v 61% controls) was identical. The association of a risk for SIDS infants who routinely used a pacifier but did not do so for the last sleep became non-significant when controlled for socioeconomic status (bivariate OR, 1.39 (0.93 to 2.07)). CONCLUSIONS Further epidemiological evidence and physiological studies are needed before pacifier use can be recommended as a measure to reduce the risk of SIDS. Key messages There was no difference between victims of SIDS and control infants in routine use of a pacifier (“dummy” or “soother”) for day or night sleeps The use of a pacifier was associated with a lower prevalence and shorter duration of breast feeding, lower socioeconomic status, and mothers who smoked more heavily There was no association between pacifier use and sleeping position More control infants used a pacifier for the last/reference sleep, giving an apparent “protective” effect against SIDS; the significance of this association increased when controlled for other factors Further epidemiological evidence and physiological studies are needed before we can recommend pacifier use as protective against SIDS
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 0003-9888
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0003-9888
  • 1468-2044
url: Link


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creatorFleming, Peter J ; Blair, Peter S ; Pollard, Katie ; Platt, Martin Ward ; Leach, Charlotte ; Smith, Iain ; Berry, P J ; Golding, Jean
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descriptionOBJECTIVES To investigate the relation between pacifier use and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). DESIGN Three year population based, case control study with parental interviews for each death and four age matched controls. SETTING Five regions in England (population > 17 million). SUBJECTS 325 infants who had died from SIDS and 1300 control infants. RESULTS Significantly fewer SIDS infants (40%) than controls (51%) used a pacifier for the last/reference sleep (univariate odds ratio (OR), 0.62; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.46 to 0.83) and the difference increased when controlled for other factors (multivariate OR, 0.41; 95% CI, 0.22 to 0.77). However, the proportion of infants who had ever used a pacifier for day (66% SIDS v 66% controls) or night sleeps (61% SIDS v 61% controls) was identical. The association of a risk for SIDS infants who routinely used a pacifier but did not do so for the last sleep became non-significant when controlled for socioeconomic status (bivariate OR, 1.39 (0.93 to 2.07)). CONCLUSIONS Further epidemiological evidence and physiological studies are needed before pacifier use can be recommended as a measure to reduce the risk of SIDS. Key messages There was no difference between victims of SIDS and control infants in routine use of a pacifier (“dummy” or “soother”) for day or night sleeps The use of a pacifier was associated with a lower prevalence and shorter duration of breast feeding, lower socioeconomic status, and mothers who smoked more heavily There was no association between pacifier use and sleeping position More control infants used a pacifier for the last/reference sleep, giving an apparent “protective” effect against SIDS; the significance of this association increased when controlled for other factors Further epidemiological evidence and physiological studies are needed before we can recommend pacifier use as protective against SIDS
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subjectAnesthesia. Intensive care medicine. Transfusions. Cell therapy and gene therapy ; Babies ; Biological and medical sciences ; breast feeding ; Breastfeeding & lactation ; Confidence intervals ; Emergency and intensive care: neonates and children. Prematurity. Sudden death ; Families & family life ; Health care policy ; Intensive care medicine ; Medical sciences ; Original ; Original Articles ; pacifiers ; Parents & parenting ; Physiology ; Questionnaires ; SIDS ; Sleep ; Socioeconomic factors ; Studies ; Sudden infant death syndrome
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2Pollard, Katie
3Platt, Martin Ward
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5Smith, Iain
6Berry, P J
7Golding, Jean
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descriptionOBJECTIVES To investigate the relation between pacifier use and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). DESIGN Three year population based, case control study with parental interviews for each death and four age matched controls. SETTING Five regions in England (population > 17 million). SUBJECTS 325 infants who had died from SIDS and 1300 control infants. RESULTS Significantly fewer SIDS infants (40%) than controls (51%) used a pacifier for the last/reference sleep (univariate odds ratio (OR), 0.62; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.46 to 0.83) and the difference increased when controlled for other factors (multivariate OR, 0.41; 95% CI, 0.22 to 0.77). However, the proportion of infants who had ever used a pacifier for day (66% SIDS v 66% controls) or night sleeps (61% SIDS v 61% controls) was identical. The association of a risk for SIDS infants who routinely used a pacifier but did not do so for the last sleep became non-significant when controlled for socioeconomic status (bivariate OR, 1.39 (0.93 to 2.07)). CONCLUSIONS Further epidemiological evidence and physiological studies are needed before pacifier use can be recommended as a measure to reduce the risk of SIDS. Key messages There was no difference between victims of SIDS and control infants in routine use of a pacifier (“dummy” or “soother”) for day or night sleeps The use of a pacifier was associated with a lower prevalence and shorter duration of breast feeding, lower socioeconomic status, and mothers who smoked more heavily There was no association between pacifier use and sleeping position More control infants used a pacifier for the last/reference sleep, giving an apparent “protective” effect against SIDS; the significance of this association increased when controlled for other factors Further epidemiological evidence and physiological studies are needed before we can recommend pacifier use as protective against SIDS
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10Medical sciences
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14Parents & parenting
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20Studies
21Sudden infant death syndrome
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authorFleming, Peter J ; Blair, Peter S ; Pollard, Katie ; Platt, Martin Ward ; Leach, Charlotte ; Smith, Iain ; Berry, P J ; Golding, Jean
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abstractOBJECTIVES To investigate the relation between pacifier use and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). DESIGN Three year population based, case control study with parental interviews for each death and four age matched controls. SETTING Five regions in England (population > 17 million). SUBJECTS 325 infants who had died from SIDS and 1300 control infants. RESULTS Significantly fewer SIDS infants (40%) than controls (51%) used a pacifier for the last/reference sleep (univariate odds ratio (OR), 0.62; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.46 to 0.83) and the difference increased when controlled for other factors (multivariate OR, 0.41; 95% CI, 0.22 to 0.77). However, the proportion of infants who had ever used a pacifier for day (66% SIDS v 66% controls) or night sleeps (61% SIDS v 61% controls) was identical. The association of a risk for SIDS infants who routinely used a pacifier but did not do so for the last sleep became non-significant when controlled for socioeconomic status (bivariate OR, 1.39 (0.93 to 2.07)). CONCLUSIONS Further epidemiological evidence and physiological studies are needed before pacifier use can be recommended as a measure to reduce the risk of SIDS. Key messages There was no difference between victims of SIDS and control infants in routine use of a pacifier (“dummy” or “soother”) for day or night sleeps The use of a pacifier was associated with a lower prevalence and shorter duration of breast feeding, lower socioeconomic status, and mothers who smoked more heavily There was no association between pacifier use and sleeping position More control infants used a pacifier for the last/reference sleep, giving an apparent “protective” effect against SIDS; the significance of this association increased when controlled for other factors Further epidemiological evidence and physiological studies are needed before we can recommend pacifier use as protective against SIDS
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