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Weight gain and sudden infant death syndrome: changes in weight z scores may identify infants at increased risk

AIMS To investigate patterns of infant growth that may influence the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). DESIGN Three year population based case control study with parental interviews for each death and four age matched controls. Growth was measured from prospective weight observations usin... Full description

Journal Title: Archives of disease in childhood 2000, Vol.82 (6), p.462-469
Main Author: Blair, Peter S
Other Authors: Nadin, Pam , Cole, Tim J , Fleming, Peter J , Smith, Iain J , Platt, Martin Ward , Berry, P J , Golding, Jean
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Age
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: London: BMJ Publishing Group Ltd and Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health
ID: ISSN: 0003-9888
Zum Text:
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recordid: cdi_pubmedcentral_primary_oai_pubmedcentral_nih_gov_1718350
title: Weight gain and sudden infant death syndrome: changes in weight z scores may identify infants at increased risk
format: Article
creator:
  • Blair, Peter S
  • Nadin, Pam
  • Cole, Tim J
  • Fleming, Peter J
  • Smith, Iain J
  • Platt, Martin Ward
  • Berry, P J
  • Golding, Jean
subjects:
  • Age
  • Analysis. Health state
  • Anesthesia. Intensive care medicine. Transfusions. Cell therapy and gene therapy
  • Babies
  • Biological and medical sciences
  • Birth weight
  • Birth Weight - physiology
  • Case-Control Studies
  • Community Child Health
  • Community Child Health, Public Health, and Epidemiology
  • conditional growth charts
  • Emergency and intensive care: neonates and children. Prematurity. Sudden death
  • England - epidemiology
  • Epidemiology
  • Families & family life
  • Female
  • Gender
  • General aspects
  • Humans
  • Infant
  • Infant, Newborn
  • Intensive care medicine
  • Male
  • Medical records
  • Medical sciences
  • Multivariate Analysis
  • Public Health
  • Public health. Hygiene
  • Public health. Hygiene-occupational medicine
  • Risk Assessment
  • Risk Factors
  • SIDS
  • Sleep
  • Studies
  • Sudden Infant Death - epidemiology
  • Sudden Infant Death - etiology
  • Sudden infant death syndrome
  • Weight Gain
  • z scores
ispartof: Archives of disease in childhood, 2000, Vol.82 (6), p.462-469
description: AIMS To investigate patterns of infant growth that may influence the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). DESIGN Three year population based case control study with parental interviews for each death and four age matched controls. Growth was measured from prospective weight observations using the British 1990 Growth Reference. SETTING Five regions in England (population greater than 17 million, more than 470 000 live births over three years). SUBJECTS 247 SIDS cases and 1110 controls. RESULTS The growth rate from birth to the final weight observation was significantly poorer among the SIDS infants despite controlling for potential confounders (SIDS mean change in weight z score (δzw) = −0.38 (SD 1.40)v controls = +0.22 (SD 1.10), multivariate: p 
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 0003-9888
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0003-9888
  • 1468-2044
url: Link


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titleWeight gain and sudden infant death syndrome: changes in weight z scores may identify infants at increased risk
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creatorBlair, Peter S ; Nadin, Pam ; Cole, Tim J ; Fleming, Peter J ; Smith, Iain J ; Platt, Martin Ward ; Berry, P J ; Golding, Jean
creatorcontribBlair, Peter S ; Nadin, Pam ; Cole, Tim J ; Fleming, Peter J ; Smith, Iain J ; Platt, Martin Ward ; Berry, P J ; Golding, Jean
descriptionAIMS To investigate patterns of infant growth that may influence the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). DESIGN Three year population based case control study with parental interviews for each death and four age matched controls. Growth was measured from prospective weight observations using the British 1990 Growth Reference. SETTING Five regions in England (population greater than 17 million, more than 470 000 live births over three years). SUBJECTS 247 SIDS cases and 1110 controls. RESULTS The growth rate from birth to the final weight observation was significantly poorer among the SIDS infants despite controlling for potential confounders (SIDS mean change in weight z score (δzw) = −0.38 (SD 1.40)v controls = +0.22 (SD 1.10), multivariate: p < 0.0001). Weight gain was poorer among SIDS infants with a normal birth weight (above the 16th centile: odds ratio (OR) = 1.75, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.48–2.07, p < 0.0001) than for those with lower birth weight (OR = 1.09, 95% CI 0.61–1.95, p = 0.76). There was no evidence of increased growth retardation before death. CONCLUSIONS Poor postnatal weight gain was independently associated with an increased risk of SIDS and could be identified at the routine six week assessment. Key messages The lower weight of SIDS infants compared to the control infants which was apparent at birth was even more notable in the two weeks before death SIDS infants, particularly those of normal birth weight, exhibited poorer weight gain than their controls Although poor growth was evident among SIDS infants there was no evidence of accelerated retardation in the weeks prior to death The difference in growth between SIDS and control infants was apparent within the first five to seven weeks of life
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subjectAge ; Analysis. Health state ; Anesthesia. Intensive care medicine. Transfusions. Cell therapy and gene therapy ; Babies ; Biological and medical sciences ; Birth weight ; Birth Weight - physiology ; Case-Control Studies ; Community Child Health ; Community Child Health, Public Health, and Epidemiology ; conditional growth charts ; Emergency and intensive care: neonates and children. Prematurity. Sudden death ; England - epidemiology ; Epidemiology ; Families & family life ; Female ; Gender ; General aspects ; Humans ; Infant ; Infant, Newborn ; Intensive care medicine ; Male ; Medical records ; Medical sciences ; Multivariate Analysis ; Public Health ; Public health. Hygiene ; Public health. Hygiene-occupational medicine ; Risk Assessment ; Risk Factors ; SIDS ; Sleep ; Studies ; Sudden Infant Death - epidemiology ; Sudden Infant Death - etiology ; Sudden infant death syndrome ; Weight Gain ; z scores
ispartofArchives of disease in childhood, 2000, Vol.82 (6), p.462-469
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descriptionAIMS To investigate patterns of infant growth that may influence the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). DESIGN Three year population based case control study with parental interviews for each death and four age matched controls. Growth was measured from prospective weight observations using the British 1990 Growth Reference. SETTING Five regions in England (population greater than 17 million, more than 470 000 live births over three years). SUBJECTS 247 SIDS cases and 1110 controls. RESULTS The growth rate from birth to the final weight observation was significantly poorer among the SIDS infants despite controlling for potential confounders (SIDS mean change in weight z score (δzw) = −0.38 (SD 1.40)v controls = +0.22 (SD 1.10), multivariate: p < 0.0001). Weight gain was poorer among SIDS infants with a normal birth weight (above the 16th centile: odds ratio (OR) = 1.75, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.48–2.07, p < 0.0001) than for those with lower birth weight (OR = 1.09, 95% CI 0.61–1.95, p = 0.76). There was no evidence of increased growth retardation before death. CONCLUSIONS Poor postnatal weight gain was independently associated with an increased risk of SIDS and could be identified at the routine six week assessment. Key messages The lower weight of SIDS infants compared to the control infants which was apparent at birth was even more notable in the two weeks before death SIDS infants, particularly those of normal birth weight, exhibited poorer weight gain than their controls Although poor growth was evident among SIDS infants there was no evidence of accelerated retardation in the weeks prior to death The difference in growth between SIDS and control infants was apparent within the first five to seven weeks of life
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8Community Child Health
9Community Child Health, Public Health, and Epidemiology
10conditional growth charts
11Emergency and intensive care: neonates and children. Prematurity. Sudden death
12England - epidemiology
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abstractAIMS To investigate patterns of infant growth that may influence the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). DESIGN Three year population based case control study with parental interviews for each death and four age matched controls. Growth was measured from prospective weight observations using the British 1990 Growth Reference. SETTING Five regions in England (population greater than 17 million, more than 470 000 live births over three years). SUBJECTS 247 SIDS cases and 1110 controls. RESULTS The growth rate from birth to the final weight observation was significantly poorer among the SIDS infants despite controlling for potential confounders (SIDS mean change in weight z score (δzw) = −0.38 (SD 1.40)v controls = +0.22 (SD 1.10), multivariate: p < 0.0001). Weight gain was poorer among SIDS infants with a normal birth weight (above the 16th centile: odds ratio (OR) = 1.75, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.48–2.07, p < 0.0001) than for those with lower birth weight (OR = 1.09, 95% CI 0.61–1.95, p = 0.76). There was no evidence of increased growth retardation before death. CONCLUSIONS Poor postnatal weight gain was independently associated with an increased risk of SIDS and could be identified at the routine six week assessment. Key messages The lower weight of SIDS infants compared to the control infants which was apparent at birth was even more notable in the two weeks before death SIDS infants, particularly those of normal birth weight, exhibited poorer weight gain than their controls Although poor growth was evident among SIDS infants there was no evidence of accelerated retardation in the weeks prior to death The difference in growth between SIDS and control infants was apparent within the first five to seven weeks of life
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