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Bone marrow derivation of pericryptal myofibroblasts in the mouse and human small intestine and colon

Background and aims: In order to establish whether extraintestinal cells contribute to the turnover and repair of gastrointestinal tissues, we studied the colons and small intestines of female mice that had received a male bone marrow transplant, together with gastrointestinal biopsies from female p... Full description

Journal Title: Gut 2002, Vol.50 (6), p.752-757
Main Author: Brittan, M
Other Authors: Hunt, T , Jeffery, R , Poulsom, R , Forbes, S J , Hodivala-Dilke, K , Goldman, J , Alison, M R , Wright, N A
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
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Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: London: BMJ Publishing Group Ltd and British Society of Gastroenterology
ID: ISSN: 0017-5749
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recordid: cdi_pubmedcentral_primary_oai_pubmedcentral_nih_gov_1773238
title: Bone marrow derivation of pericryptal myofibroblasts in the mouse and human small intestine and colon
format: Article
creator:
  • Brittan, M
  • Hunt, T
  • Jeffery, R
  • Poulsom, R
  • Forbes, S J
  • Hodivala-Dilke, K
  • Goldman, J
  • Alison, M R
  • Wright, N A
subjects:
  • Abridged Index Medicus
  • Animals
  • Antigens
  • Biological and medical sciences
  • Biopsy
  • Bone marrow
  • bone marrow stem cells
  • Bone Marrow Transplantation - pathology
  • Care and treatment
  • Cell Differentiation
  • Cell division
  • Chromosomes
  • colon
  • Colon - cytology
  • Digestive system
  • Female
  • Fibroblasts - pathology
  • Gastrointestinal diseases
  • Graft vs Host Disease - pathology
  • Growth factors
  • Humans
  • intestinal subepithelial myofibroblast
  • Intestine, Small - cytology
  • Investigative techniques, diagnostic techniques (general aspects)
  • ISEMF
  • Laboratories
  • Male
  • Medical research
  • Medical sciences
  • Mice
  • Mice, Inbred C57BL
  • Pathology. Cytology. Biochemistry. Spectrometry. Miscellaneous investigative techniques
  • PBS
  • PDGF
  • Peer review
  • pericryptal myofibroblasts
  • Phosphatase
  • phosphate buffered saline
  • platelet derived growth factor
  • Rapid Communication
  • Regeneration - physiology
  • Small intestine
  • Smooth muscle
  • SSC
  • standard saline citrate
  • Stem cells
  • Transplantation
  • Transplants & implants
  • Y chromosome
  • Y Chromosome - chemistry
  • α smooth muscle actin
  • αSMA
ispartof: Gut, 2002, Vol.50 (6), p.752-757
description: Background and aims: In order to establish whether extraintestinal cells contribute to the turnover and repair of gastrointestinal tissues, we studied the colons and small intestines of female mice that had received a male bone marrow transplant, together with gastrointestinal biopsies from female patients that had developed graft versus host disease after receiving a bone marrow transplant from male donors. Methods: Using in situ hybridisation to detect Y chromosomes and immunohistochemistry, we demonstrated that cells derived from injected bone marrow frequently engrafted into the intestine and differentiated into pericryptal myofibroblasts. Results: In the human intestine, we confirmed by combining in situ hybridisation with immunostaining for smooth muscle actin that the bone marrow derived cells within the intestine exhibited a myofibroblast phenotype. In female mouse recipients of male bone marrow grafts, we observed colocalisation of Y chromosomes and clusters of newly formed marrow derived myofibroblasts. While few of these were present at seven days after bone marrow transplantation, they were numerous at 14 days, and by six weeks entire columns of pericryptal myofibroblasts could be seen running up the sides of crypts in both the small intestine and colon. These columns appeared to extend into the villi in the small intestine. Within the intestinal lamina propria, these Y chromosome positive cells were negative for the mouse macrophage marker F4/80 antigen and CD34. Conclusions: Bone marrow derived pericryptal myofibroblasts were present in the mouse intestine following irradiation and bone marrow transplant, and in the intestines of human patients suffering graft versus host disease following a bone marrow transplant. Our data indicate that bone marrow cells contribute to the regeneration of intestinal myofibroblasts and epithelium after damage, and we suggest that this could be exploited therapeutically.
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 0017-5749
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0017-5749
  • 1468-3288
url: Link


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titleBone marrow derivation of pericryptal myofibroblasts in the mouse and human small intestine and colon
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creatorBrittan, M ; Hunt, T ; Jeffery, R ; Poulsom, R ; Forbes, S J ; Hodivala-Dilke, K ; Goldman, J ; Alison, M R ; Wright, N A
creatorcontribBrittan, M ; Hunt, T ; Jeffery, R ; Poulsom, R ; Forbes, S J ; Hodivala-Dilke, K ; Goldman, J ; Alison, M R ; Wright, N A
descriptionBackground and aims: In order to establish whether extraintestinal cells contribute to the turnover and repair of gastrointestinal tissues, we studied the colons and small intestines of female mice that had received a male bone marrow transplant, together with gastrointestinal biopsies from female patients that had developed graft versus host disease after receiving a bone marrow transplant from male donors. Methods: Using in situ hybridisation to detect Y chromosomes and immunohistochemistry, we demonstrated that cells derived from injected bone marrow frequently engrafted into the intestine and differentiated into pericryptal myofibroblasts. Results: In the human intestine, we confirmed by combining in situ hybridisation with immunostaining for smooth muscle actin that the bone marrow derived cells within the intestine exhibited a myofibroblast phenotype. In female mouse recipients of male bone marrow grafts, we observed colocalisation of Y chromosomes and clusters of newly formed marrow derived myofibroblasts. While few of these were present at seven days after bone marrow transplantation, they were numerous at 14 days, and by six weeks entire columns of pericryptal myofibroblasts could be seen running up the sides of crypts in both the small intestine and colon. These columns appeared to extend into the villi in the small intestine. Within the intestinal lamina propria, these Y chromosome positive cells were negative for the mouse macrophage marker F4/80 antigen and CD34. Conclusions: Bone marrow derived pericryptal myofibroblasts were present in the mouse intestine following irradiation and bone marrow transplant, and in the intestines of human patients suffering graft versus host disease following a bone marrow transplant. Our data indicate that bone marrow cells contribute to the regeneration of intestinal myofibroblasts and epithelium after damage, and we suggest that this could be exploited therapeutically.
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0ISSN: 0017-5749
1EISSN: 1468-3288
2DOI: 10.1136/gut.50.6.752
3PMID: 12010874
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languageeng
publisherLondon: BMJ Publishing Group Ltd and British Society of Gastroenterology
subjectAbridged Index Medicus ; Animals ; Antigens ; Biological and medical sciences ; Biopsy ; Bone marrow ; bone marrow stem cells ; Bone Marrow Transplantation - pathology ; Care and treatment ; Cell Differentiation ; Cell division ; Chromosomes ; colon ; Colon - cytology ; Digestive system ; Female ; Fibroblasts - pathology ; Gastrointestinal diseases ; Graft vs Host Disease - pathology ; Growth factors ; Humans ; intestinal subepithelial myofibroblast ; Intestine, Small - cytology ; Investigative techniques, diagnostic techniques (general aspects) ; ISEMF ; Laboratories ; Male ; Medical research ; Medical sciences ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Pathology. Cytology. Biochemistry. Spectrometry. Miscellaneous investigative techniques ; PBS ; PDGF ; Peer review ; pericryptal myofibroblasts ; Phosphatase ; phosphate buffered saline ; platelet derived growth factor ; Rapid Communication ; Regeneration - physiology ; Small intestine ; Smooth muscle ; SSC ; standard saline citrate ; Stem cells ; Transplantation ; Transplants & implants ; Y chromosome ; Y Chromosome - chemistry ; α smooth muscle actin ; αSMA
ispartofGut, 2002, Vol.50 (6), p.752-757
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1Hunt, T
2Jeffery, R
3Poulsom, R
4Forbes, S J
5Hodivala-Dilke, K
6Goldman, J
7Alison, M R
8Wright, N A
title
0Bone marrow derivation of pericryptal myofibroblasts in the mouse and human small intestine and colon
1Gut
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descriptionBackground and aims: In order to establish whether extraintestinal cells contribute to the turnover and repair of gastrointestinal tissues, we studied the colons and small intestines of female mice that had received a male bone marrow transplant, together with gastrointestinal biopsies from female patients that had developed graft versus host disease after receiving a bone marrow transplant from male donors. Methods: Using in situ hybridisation to detect Y chromosomes and immunohistochemistry, we demonstrated that cells derived from injected bone marrow frequently engrafted into the intestine and differentiated into pericryptal myofibroblasts. Results: In the human intestine, we confirmed by combining in situ hybridisation with immunostaining for smooth muscle actin that the bone marrow derived cells within the intestine exhibited a myofibroblast phenotype. In female mouse recipients of male bone marrow grafts, we observed colocalisation of Y chromosomes and clusters of newly formed marrow derived myofibroblasts. While few of these were present at seven days after bone marrow transplantation, they were numerous at 14 days, and by six weeks entire columns of pericryptal myofibroblasts could be seen running up the sides of crypts in both the small intestine and colon. These columns appeared to extend into the villi in the small intestine. Within the intestinal lamina propria, these Y chromosome positive cells were negative for the mouse macrophage marker F4/80 antigen and CD34. Conclusions: Bone marrow derived pericryptal myofibroblasts were present in the mouse intestine following irradiation and bone marrow transplant, and in the intestines of human patients suffering graft versus host disease following a bone marrow transplant. Our data indicate that bone marrow cells contribute to the regeneration of intestinal myofibroblasts and epithelium after damage, and we suggest that this could be exploited therapeutically.
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0Abridged Index Medicus
1Animals
2Antigens
3Biological and medical sciences
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24ISEMF
25Laboratories
26Male
27Medical research
28Medical sciences
29Mice
30Mice, Inbred C57BL
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32PBS
33PDGF
34Peer review
35pericryptal myofibroblasts
36Phosphatase
37phosphate buffered saline
38platelet derived growth factor
39Rapid Communication
40Regeneration - physiology
41Small intestine
42Smooth muscle
43SSC
44standard saline citrate
45Stem cells
46Transplantation
47Transplants & implants
48Y chromosome
49Y Chromosome - chemistry
50α smooth muscle actin
51αSMA
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authorBrittan, M ; Hunt, T ; Jeffery, R ; Poulsom, R ; Forbes, S J ; Hodivala-Dilke, K ; Goldman, J ; Alison, M R ; Wright, N A
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9Cell Differentiation
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0Brittan, M
1Hunt, T
2Jeffery, R
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4Forbes, S J
5Hodivala-Dilke, K
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7Alison, M R
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atitleBone marrow derivation of pericryptal myofibroblasts in the mouse and human small intestine and colon
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notes
0Correspondence to:
 M Brittan, Histopathology Unit, Cancer Research UK, 44 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PX, UK;
 mairi.brittan@cancer.org.uk
1Correspondence to: …M Brittan, Histopathology Unit, Cancer Research UK, 44 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PX, UK; …mairi.brittan@cancer.org.uk
abstractBackground and aims: In order to establish whether extraintestinal cells contribute to the turnover and repair of gastrointestinal tissues, we studied the colons and small intestines of female mice that had received a male bone marrow transplant, together with gastrointestinal biopsies from female patients that had developed graft versus host disease after receiving a bone marrow transplant from male donors. Methods: Using in situ hybridisation to detect Y chromosomes and immunohistochemistry, we demonstrated that cells derived from injected bone marrow frequently engrafted into the intestine and differentiated into pericryptal myofibroblasts. Results: In the human intestine, we confirmed by combining in situ hybridisation with immunostaining for smooth muscle actin that the bone marrow derived cells within the intestine exhibited a myofibroblast phenotype. In female mouse recipients of male bone marrow grafts, we observed colocalisation of Y chromosomes and clusters of newly formed marrow derived myofibroblasts. While few of these were present at seven days after bone marrow transplantation, they were numerous at 14 days, and by six weeks entire columns of pericryptal myofibroblasts could be seen running up the sides of crypts in both the small intestine and colon. These columns appeared to extend into the villi in the small intestine. Within the intestinal lamina propria, these Y chromosome positive cells were negative for the mouse macrophage marker F4/80 antigen and CD34. Conclusions: Bone marrow derived pericryptal myofibroblasts were present in the mouse intestine following irradiation and bone marrow transplant, and in the intestines of human patients suffering graft versus host disease following a bone marrow transplant. Our data indicate that bone marrow cells contribute to the regeneration of intestinal myofibroblasts and epithelium after damage, and we suggest that this could be exploited therapeutically.
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