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The Rate of Genome Stabilization in Homoploid Hybrid Species

Homoploid hybrid speciation has been recognized for its potential rapid completion, an idea that has received support from experimental and modeling studies. Following initial hybridization, the genomes of parental species recombine and junctions between chromosomal blocks of different parental orig... Full description

Journal Title: Evolution 2008, Vol.62 (2), p.266-275
Main Author: Buerkle, C. Alex
Other Authors: Rieseberg, Loren H
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: Malden, USA: Blackwell Science Inc
ID: ISSN: 0014-3820
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18039323
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recordid: cdi_pubmedcentral_primary_oai_pubmedcentral_nih_gov_2442919
title: The Rate of Genome Stabilization in Homoploid Hybrid Species
format: Article
creator:
  • Buerkle, C. Alex
  • Rieseberg, Loren H
subjects:
  • Admixture
  • Chimera
  • Chromosome Mapping
  • Chromosomes
  • Computer Simulation
  • Density estimation
  • Evolution
  • Evolutionary genetics
  • Flowers & plants
  • Genes
  • Genetic aspects
  • Genetic hybridization
  • Genetic research
  • Genetic Speciation
  • Genetic Variation
  • Genome, Plant
  • Genomes
  • Genomics
  • Helianthus
  • Helianthus - genetics
  • hybrid speciation
  • Hybridity
  • Hybridization
  • Isolation (Philosophy)
  • junction theory
  • Linkage Disequilibrium
  • Models, Genetic
  • Models, Statistical
  • Models, Theoretical
  • Original s
  • Population size
  • recombination
  • Recombination, Genetic
  • Selection, Genetic
  • Speciation
  • Species Specificity
  • Sunflowers
ispartof: Evolution, 2008, Vol.62 (2), p.266-275
description: Homoploid hybrid speciation has been recognized for its potential rapid completion, an idea that has received support from experimental and modeling studies. Following initial hybridization, the genomes of parental species recombine and junctions between chromosomal blocks of different parental origin leave a record of recombination and the time period before homogenization of the derived genome. We use detailed genetic maps of three hybrid species of sunflowers and models to estimate the time required for the stabilization of the new hybrid genome. In contrast to previous estimates of 60 or fewer generations, we find that the genomes of three hybrid sunflower species were not stabilized for hundreds of generations. These results are reconciled with previous research by recognizing that the stabilization of a hybrid species' genome is not synonymous with hybrid speciation. Segregating factors that contribute to initial ecological or intrinsic genetic isolation may become stabilized quickly. The remainder of the genome likely becomes stabilized over a longer time interval, with recombination and drift dictating the contributions of the parental genomes. Our modeling of genome stabilization provides an upper bound for the time interval for reproductive isolation to be established and confirms the rapid nature of homoploid hybrid speciation.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0014-3820
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0014-3820
  • 1558-5646
url: Link


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descriptionHomoploid hybrid speciation has been recognized for its potential rapid completion, an idea that has received support from experimental and modeling studies. Following initial hybridization, the genomes of parental species recombine and junctions between chromosomal blocks of different parental origin leave a record of recombination and the time period before homogenization of the derived genome. We use detailed genetic maps of three hybrid species of sunflowers and models to estimate the time required for the stabilization of the new hybrid genome. In contrast to previous estimates of 60 or fewer generations, we find that the genomes of three hybrid sunflower species were not stabilized for hundreds of generations. These results are reconciled with previous research by recognizing that the stabilization of a hybrid species' genome is not synonymous with hybrid speciation. Segregating factors that contribute to initial ecological or intrinsic genetic isolation may become stabilized quickly. The remainder of the genome likely becomes stabilized over a longer time interval, with recombination and drift dictating the contributions of the parental genomes. Our modeling of genome stabilization provides an upper bound for the time interval for reproductive isolation to be established and confirms the rapid nature of homoploid hybrid speciation.
editionReceived July 5, 2007Accepted August 31, 2007
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subjectAdmixture ; Chimera ; Chromosome Mapping ; Chromosomes ; Computer Simulation ; Density estimation ; Evolution ; Evolutionary genetics ; Flowers & plants ; Genes ; Genetic aspects ; Genetic hybridization ; Genetic research ; Genetic Speciation ; Genetic Variation ; Genome, Plant ; Genomes ; Genomics ; Helianthus ; Helianthus - genetics ; hybrid speciation ; Hybridity ; Hybridization ; Isolation (Philosophy) ; junction theory ; Linkage Disequilibrium ; Models, Genetic ; Models, Statistical ; Models, Theoretical ; Original s ; Population size ; recombination ; Recombination, Genetic ; Selection, Genetic ; Speciation ; Species Specificity ; Sunflowers
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descriptionHomoploid hybrid speciation has been recognized for its potential rapid completion, an idea that has received support from experimental and modeling studies. Following initial hybridization, the genomes of parental species recombine and junctions between chromosomal blocks of different parental origin leave a record of recombination and the time period before homogenization of the derived genome. We use detailed genetic maps of three hybrid species of sunflowers and models to estimate the time required for the stabilization of the new hybrid genome. In contrast to previous estimates of 60 or fewer generations, we find that the genomes of three hybrid sunflower species were not stabilized for hundreds of generations. These results are reconciled with previous research by recognizing that the stabilization of a hybrid species' genome is not synonymous with hybrid speciation. Segregating factors that contribute to initial ecological or intrinsic genetic isolation may become stabilized quickly. The remainder of the genome likely becomes stabilized over a longer time interval, with recombination and drift dictating the contributions of the parental genomes. Our modeling of genome stabilization provides an upper bound for the time interval for reproductive isolation to be established and confirms the rapid nature of homoploid hybrid speciation.
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1Chimera
2Chromosome Mapping
3Chromosomes
4Computer Simulation
5Density estimation
6Evolution
7Evolutionary genetics
8Flowers & plants
9Genes
10Genetic aspects
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12Genetic research
13Genetic Speciation
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16Genomes
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25Linkage Disequilibrium
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1Chimera
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10Genetic aspects
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25Linkage Disequilibrium
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33Selection, Genetic
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abstractHomoploid hybrid speciation has been recognized for its potential rapid completion, an idea that has received support from experimental and modeling studies. Following initial hybridization, the genomes of parental species recombine and junctions between chromosomal blocks of different parental origin leave a record of recombination and the time period before homogenization of the derived genome. We use detailed genetic maps of three hybrid species of sunflowers and models to estimate the time required for the stabilization of the new hybrid genome. In contrast to previous estimates of 60 or fewer generations, we find that the genomes of three hybrid sunflower species were not stabilized for hundreds of generations. These results are reconciled with previous research by recognizing that the stabilization of a hybrid species' genome is not synonymous with hybrid speciation. Segregating factors that contribute to initial ecological or intrinsic genetic isolation may become stabilized quickly. The remainder of the genome likely becomes stabilized over a longer time interval, with recombination and drift dictating the contributions of the parental genomes. Our modeling of genome stabilization provides an upper bound for the time interval for reproductive isolation to be established and confirms the rapid nature of homoploid hybrid speciation.
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pmid18039323
doi10.1111/j.1558-5646.2007.00267.x
tpages10
editionReceived July 5, 2007Accepted August 31, 2007
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