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Radiation of Extant Cetaceans Driven by Restructuring of the Oceans

The remarkable fossil record of whales and dolphins (Cetacea) has made them an exemplar of macroevolution. Although their overall adaptive transition from terrestrial to fully aquatic organisms is well known, this is not true for the radiation of modern whales. Here, we explore the diversification o... Full description

Journal Title: Systematic Biology 2009-10-05, Vol.58 (6), p.573-585
Main Author: Steeman, Mette E
Other Authors: Hebsgaard, Martin B , Fordyce, R. Ewan , Ho, Simon Y. W , Rabosky, Daniel L , Nielsen, Rasmus , Rahbek, Carsten , Glenner, Henrik , Sørensen, Martin V , Willerslev, Eske
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: England: Oxford University Press
ID: ISSN: 1063-5157
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20525610
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recordid: cdi_pubmedcentral_primary_oai_pubmedcentral_nih_gov_2777972
title: Radiation of Extant Cetaceans Driven by Restructuring of the Oceans
format: Article
creator:
  • Steeman, Mette E
  • Hebsgaard, Martin B
  • Fordyce, R. Ewan
  • Ho, Simon Y. W
  • Rabosky, Daniel L
  • Nielsen, Rasmus
  • Rahbek, Carsten
  • Glenner, Henrik
  • Sørensen, Martin V
  • Willerslev, Eske
subjects:
  • Animals
  • Baleen
  • Base Sequence
  • Bayes Theorem
  • Cetacea
  • Cetacea - genetics
  • Cetacea - physiology
  • Cetaceans
  • Computational Biology
  • Dolphins & porpoises
  • Echolocation - physiology
  • Environment
  • Evolution
  • Evolution & development
  • Evolution, Molecular
  • Feeding Behavior - physiology
  • Fossils
  • Genetic Speciation
  • Likelihood Functions
  • molecular phylogeny
  • Molecular structure
  • ocean restructuring
  • Oceans
  • Oceans and Seas
  • palaeo
  • palaeo-ocean restructuring
  • Parametric models
  • Phylogeny
  • Radiation
  • Regular
  • Regular Articles
  • Sequence Alignment
  • Speciation
  • Straits
  • Systematic biology
  • Whales
  • Whales & whaling
ispartof: Systematic Biology, 2009-10-05, Vol.58 (6), p.573-585
description: The remarkable fossil record of whales and dolphins (Cetacea) has made them an exemplar of macroevolution. Although their overall adaptive transition from terrestrial to fully aquatic organisms is well known, this is not true for the radiation of modern whales. Here, we explore the diversification of extant cetaceans by constructing a robust molecular phylogeny that includes 87 of 89 extant species. The phylogeny and divergence times are derived from nuclear and mitochondrial markers, calibrated with fossils. We find that the toothed whales are monophyletic, suggesting that echolocation evolved only once early in that lineage some 36–34 Ma. The rorqual family (Balaenopteridae) is restored with the exclusion of the gray whale, suggesting that gulp feeding evolved 18–16 Ma. Delphinida, comprising all living dolphins and porpoises other than the Ganges/Indus dolphins, originated about 26 Ma; it contains the taxonomically rich delphinids, which began diversifying less than 11 Ma. We tested 2 hypothesized drivers of the extant cetacean radiation by assessing the tempo of lineage accumulation through time. We find no support for a rapid burst of speciation early in the history of extant whales, contrasting with expectations of an adaptive radiation model. However, we do find support for increased diversification rates during periods of pronounced physical restructuring of the oceans. The results imply that paleogeographic and paleoceanographic changes, such as closure of major seaways, have influenced the dynamics of radiation in extant cetaceans.
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 1063-5157
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 1063-5157
  • 1076-836X
url: Link


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creatorSteeman, Mette E ; Hebsgaard, Martin B ; Fordyce, R. Ewan ; Ho, Simon Y. W ; Rabosky, Daniel L ; Nielsen, Rasmus ; Rahbek, Carsten ; Glenner, Henrik ; Sørensen, Martin V ; Willerslev, Eske
creatorcontribSteeman, Mette E ; Hebsgaard, Martin B ; Fordyce, R. Ewan ; Ho, Simon Y. W ; Rabosky, Daniel L ; Nielsen, Rasmus ; Rahbek, Carsten ; Glenner, Henrik ; Sørensen, Martin V ; Willerslev, Eske
descriptionThe remarkable fossil record of whales and dolphins (Cetacea) has made them an exemplar of macroevolution. Although their overall adaptive transition from terrestrial to fully aquatic organisms is well known, this is not true for the radiation of modern whales. Here, we explore the diversification of extant cetaceans by constructing a robust molecular phylogeny that includes 87 of 89 extant species. The phylogeny and divergence times are derived from nuclear and mitochondrial markers, calibrated with fossils. We find that the toothed whales are monophyletic, suggesting that echolocation evolved only once early in that lineage some 36–34 Ma. The rorqual family (Balaenopteridae) is restored with the exclusion of the gray whale, suggesting that gulp feeding evolved 18–16 Ma. Delphinida, comprising all living dolphins and porpoises other than the Ganges/Indus dolphins, originated about 26 Ma; it contains the taxonomically rich delphinids, which began diversifying less than 11 Ma. We tested 2 hypothesized drivers of the extant cetacean radiation by assessing the tempo of lineage accumulation through time. We find no support for a rapid burst of speciation early in the history of extant whales, contrasting with expectations of an adaptive radiation model. However, we do find support for increased diversification rates during periods of pronounced physical restructuring of the oceans. The results imply that paleogeographic and paleoceanographic changes, such as closure of major seaways, have influenced the dynamics of radiation in extant cetaceans.
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subjectAnimals ; Baleen ; Base Sequence ; Bayes Theorem ; Cetacea ; Cetacea - genetics ; Cetacea - physiology ; Cetaceans ; Computational Biology ; Dolphins & porpoises ; Echolocation - physiology ; Environment ; Evolution ; Evolution & development ; Evolution, Molecular ; Feeding Behavior - physiology ; Fossils ; Genetic Speciation ; Likelihood Functions ; molecular phylogeny ; Molecular structure ; ocean restructuring ; Oceans ; Oceans and Seas ; palaeo ; palaeo-ocean restructuring ; Parametric models ; Phylogeny ; Radiation ; Regular ; Regular Articles ; Sequence Alignment ; Speciation ; Straits ; Systematic biology ; Whales ; Whales & whaling
ispartofSystematic Biology, 2009-10-05, Vol.58 (6), p.573-585
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7Glenner, Henrik
8Sørensen, Martin V
9Willerslev, Eske
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descriptionThe remarkable fossil record of whales and dolphins (Cetacea) has made them an exemplar of macroevolution. Although their overall adaptive transition from terrestrial to fully aquatic organisms is well known, this is not true for the radiation of modern whales. Here, we explore the diversification of extant cetaceans by constructing a robust molecular phylogeny that includes 87 of 89 extant species. The phylogeny and divergence times are derived from nuclear and mitochondrial markers, calibrated with fossils. We find that the toothed whales are monophyletic, suggesting that echolocation evolved only once early in that lineage some 36–34 Ma. The rorqual family (Balaenopteridae) is restored with the exclusion of the gray whale, suggesting that gulp feeding evolved 18–16 Ma. Delphinida, comprising all living dolphins and porpoises other than the Ganges/Indus dolphins, originated about 26 Ma; it contains the taxonomically rich delphinids, which began diversifying less than 11 Ma. We tested 2 hypothesized drivers of the extant cetacean radiation by assessing the tempo of lineage accumulation through time. We find no support for a rapid burst of speciation early in the history of extant whales, contrasting with expectations of an adaptive radiation model. However, we do find support for increased diversification rates during periods of pronounced physical restructuring of the oceans. The results imply that paleogeographic and paleoceanographic changes, such as closure of major seaways, have influenced the dynamics of radiation in extant cetaceans.
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5Cetacea - genetics
6Cetacea - physiology
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8Computational Biology
9Dolphins & porpoises
10Echolocation - physiology
11Environment
12Evolution
13Evolution & development
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15Feeding Behavior - physiology
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17Genetic Speciation
18Likelihood Functions
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20Molecular structure
21ocean restructuring
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24palaeo
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26Parametric models
27Phylogeny
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29Regular
30Regular Articles
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32Speciation
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34Systematic biology
35Whales
36Whales & whaling
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titleRadiation of Extant Cetaceans Driven by Restructuring of the Oceans
authorSteeman, Mette E ; Hebsgaard, Martin B ; Fordyce, R. Ewan ; Ho, Simon Y. W ; Rabosky, Daniel L ; Nielsen, Rasmus ; Rahbek, Carsten ; Glenner, Henrik ; Sørensen, Martin V ; Willerslev, Eske
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0Associate Editor: Susanne S. Renner
1Mette E. Steeman and Martin B. Hebsgaard contributed equally to this work and should be considered joint first authors.
abstractThe remarkable fossil record of whales and dolphins (Cetacea) has made them an exemplar of macroevolution. Although their overall adaptive transition from terrestrial to fully aquatic organisms is well known, this is not true for the radiation of modern whales. Here, we explore the diversification of extant cetaceans by constructing a robust molecular phylogeny that includes 87 of 89 extant species. The phylogeny and divergence times are derived from nuclear and mitochondrial markers, calibrated with fossils. We find that the toothed whales are monophyletic, suggesting that echolocation evolved only once early in that lineage some 36–34 Ma. The rorqual family (Balaenopteridae) is restored with the exclusion of the gray whale, suggesting that gulp feeding evolved 18–16 Ma. Delphinida, comprising all living dolphins and porpoises other than the Ganges/Indus dolphins, originated about 26 Ma; it contains the taxonomically rich delphinids, which began diversifying less than 11 Ma. We tested 2 hypothesized drivers of the extant cetacean radiation by assessing the tempo of lineage accumulation through time. We find no support for a rapid burst of speciation early in the history of extant whales, contrasting with expectations of an adaptive radiation model. However, we do find support for increased diversification rates during periods of pronounced physical restructuring of the oceans. The results imply that paleogeographic and paleoceanographic changes, such as closure of major seaways, have influenced the dynamics of radiation in extant cetaceans.
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