schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

Avian Visual Behavior and the Organization of the Telencephalon

Birds have excellent visual abilities that are comparable or superior to those of primates, but how the bird brain solves complex visual problems is poorly understood. More specifically, we lack knowledge about how such superb abilities are used in nature and how the brain, especially the telencepha... Full description

Journal Title: Brain behavior and evolution, 2010, Vol.75 (3), p.204-217
Main Author: Shimizu, Toru
Other Authors: Patton, Tadd B , Husband, Scott A
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: Basel, Switzerland: S. Karger AG
ID: ISSN: 0006-8977
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20733296
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: cdi_pubmedcentral_primary_oai_pubmedcentral_nih_gov_2977968
title: Avian Visual Behavior and the Organization of the Telencephalon
format: Article
creator:
  • Shimizu, Toru
  • Patton, Tadd B
  • Husband, Scott A
subjects:
  • Animals
  • August 2010
  • Biological Evolution
  • Birds
  • Birds - anatomy & histology
  • Birds - physiology
  • Brain Mapping
  • Columbidae - anatomy & histology
  • Columbidae - physiology
  • Columnar organization
  • Coturnix - anatomy & histology
  • Coturnix - physiology
  • Courtship
  • Female
  • genetic structures
  • Limbic System - anatomy & histology
  • Limbic System - physiology
  • Male
  • Paper
  • Parallel processing
  • Pattern Recognition, Visual - physiology
  • Pigeons
  • Primates
  • Primates - anatomy & histology
  • Primates - physiology
  • Published
  • Species Specificity
  • Superior Colliculi - anatomy & histology
  • Superior Colliculi - physiology
  • Telencephalon - anatomy & histology
  • Telencephalon - physiology
  • Telencephalon - ultrastructure
  • Visual Pathways - anatomy & histology
  • Visual Pathways - physiology
  • Visual Perception - physiology
ispartof: Brain, behavior and evolution, 2010, Vol.75 (3), p.204-217
description: Birds have excellent visual abilities that are comparable or superior to those of primates, but how the bird brain solves complex visual problems is poorly understood. More specifically, we lack knowledge about how such superb abilities are used in nature and how the brain, especially the telencephalon, is organized to process visual information. Here we review the results of several studies that examine the organization of the avian telencephalon and the relevance of visual abilities to avian social and reproductive behavior. Video playback and photographic stimuli show that birds can detect and evaluate subtle differences in local facial features of potential mates in a fashion similar to that of primates. These techniques have also revealed that birds do not attend well to global configural changes in the face, suggesting a fundamental difference between birds and primates in face perception. The telencephalon plays a major role in the visual and visuo-cognitive abilities of birds and primates, and anatomical data suggest that these animals may share similar organizational characteristics in the visual telencephalon. As is true in the primate cerebral cortex, different visual features are processed separately in the avian telencephalon where separate channels are organized in the anterior-posterior axis roughly parallel to the major laminae. Furthermore, the efferent projections from the primary visual telencephalon form an extensive column-like continuum involving the dorsolateral pallium and the lateral basal ganglia. Such a column-like organization may exist not only for vision, but for other sensory modalities and even for a continuum that links sensory and limbic areas of the avian brain. Behavioral and neural studies must be integrated in order to understand how birds have developed their amazing visual systems through 150 million years of evolution.
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 0006-8977
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0006-8977
  • 1421-9743
url: Link


@attributes
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
RANK2.4238183
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourceidproquest_pubme
recordidTN_cdi_pubmedcentral_primary_oai_pubmedcentral_nih_gov_2977968
sourceformatXML
sourcesystemPC
sourcerecordid2133833191
originalsourceidFETCH-LOGICAL-1542t-929ad8cb400992fd8b137a2a8985a0e752637c0dd34a6ab045244fe4f9fc09233
addsrcrecordideNqFkk1vEzEQhs2XaCg58AfQigOIQ-j4276AmqpQpEq9FK7W7K43MWzs1LuJBL8et2kjWiFxsjTzvK887wwhryh8oFTaIwDgVDDDH5Gp1YYbkNJKQ-ExmZQ6nVkt-BPy4q4B5imZFJGaGav1AZkOQ6iBFYVUTD8nBww058yqCfl0vA0Yq-9h2GBfzf0StyHlCmNbjUtfXeQFxvAbx5Bilbqb2qXvfWz8eol9ii_Jsw77wU9v30Py7fPp5cnZ7Pziy9eT4_MZlYKNM8sstqapBYC1rGtNTblGhsYaieC1ZIrrBtqWC1RYg5BMiM6LznYNWMb5Ifm4811v6pVvGx_HjL1b57DC_MslDO5-J4alW6StYyUBq0wxONsZpLWPGLK_p22jH11qHVPagdGdagQyz2UttdAglWKclsCkVZ4Wq3e3f8npauOH0a3C0Pi-x-jTZnBaSsqpNuL_pLBAGVW2kG8ekD_SJscS6TVkjaBCFuj9DmpyGobsu_0MFNz1pbj9pRT29d-B7cm71Rfg6IFZE8abRZf8Qv9Py7c7xU_MC5_3lvP5KQMKoGVBGQj-B2lRyjY
sourcetypeOpen Access Repository
isCDItrue
recordtypearticle
pqid749984145
display
typearticle
titleAvian Visual Behavior and the Organization of the Telencephalon
sourceAlma/SFX Local Collection
creatorShimizu, Toru ; Patton, Tadd B ; Husband, Scott A
creatorcontribShimizu, Toru ; Patton, Tadd B ; Husband, Scott A
descriptionBirds have excellent visual abilities that are comparable or superior to those of primates, but how the bird brain solves complex visual problems is poorly understood. More specifically, we lack knowledge about how such superb abilities are used in nature and how the brain, especially the telencephalon, is organized to process visual information. Here we review the results of several studies that examine the organization of the avian telencephalon and the relevance of visual abilities to avian social and reproductive behavior. Video playback and photographic stimuli show that birds can detect and evaluate subtle differences in local facial features of potential mates in a fashion similar to that of primates. These techniques have also revealed that birds do not attend well to global configural changes in the face, suggesting a fundamental difference between birds and primates in face perception. The telencephalon plays a major role in the visual and visuo-cognitive abilities of birds and primates, and anatomical data suggest that these animals may share similar organizational characteristics in the visual telencephalon. As is true in the primate cerebral cortex, different visual features are processed separately in the avian telencephalon where separate channels are organized in the anterior-posterior axis roughly parallel to the major laminae. Furthermore, the efferent projections from the primary visual telencephalon form an extensive column-like continuum involving the dorsolateral pallium and the lateral basal ganglia. Such a column-like organization may exist not only for vision, but for other sensory modalities and even for a continuum that links sensory and limbic areas of the avian brain. Behavioral and neural studies must be integrated in order to understand how birds have developed their amazing visual systems through 150 million years of evolution.
identifier
0ISSN: 0006-8977
1ISBN: 3805595808
2ISBN: 9783805595803
3EISSN: 1421-9743
4EISBN: 9783805595810
5EISBN: 3805595816
6DOI: 10.1159/000314283
7PMID: 20733296
8CODEN: BRBEBE
languageeng
publisherBasel, Switzerland: S. Karger AG
subject
ispartofBrain, behavior and evolution, 2010, Vol.75 (3), p.204-217
rights
02010 S. Karger AG, Basel
12010 S. Karger AG, Basel.
2Copyright (c) 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel
3Copyright © 2010 by S. Karger AG, Basel 2010
lds50peer_reviewed
oafree_for_read
citedbyFETCH-LOGICAL-1542t-929ad8cb400992fd8b137a2a8985a0e752637c0dd34a6ab045244fe4f9fc09233
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
openurlfulltext$$Topenurlfull_article
thumbnail$$Usyndetics_thumb_exl
backlink$$Uhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20733296$$D View this record in MEDLINE/PubMed
search
creatorcontrib
0Shimizu, Toru
1Patton, Tadd B
2Husband, Scott A
title
0Avian Visual Behavior and the Organization of the Telencephalon
1Brain, behavior and evolution
addtitleBrain Behav Evol
descriptionBirds have excellent visual abilities that are comparable or superior to those of primates, but how the bird brain solves complex visual problems is poorly understood. More specifically, we lack knowledge about how such superb abilities are used in nature and how the brain, especially the telencephalon, is organized to process visual information. Here we review the results of several studies that examine the organization of the avian telencephalon and the relevance of visual abilities to avian social and reproductive behavior. Video playback and photographic stimuli show that birds can detect and evaluate subtle differences in local facial features of potential mates in a fashion similar to that of primates. These techniques have also revealed that birds do not attend well to global configural changes in the face, suggesting a fundamental difference between birds and primates in face perception. The telencephalon plays a major role in the visual and visuo-cognitive abilities of birds and primates, and anatomical data suggest that these animals may share similar organizational characteristics in the visual telencephalon. As is true in the primate cerebral cortex, different visual features are processed separately in the avian telencephalon where separate channels are organized in the anterior-posterior axis roughly parallel to the major laminae. Furthermore, the efferent projections from the primary visual telencephalon form an extensive column-like continuum involving the dorsolateral pallium and the lateral basal ganglia. Such a column-like organization may exist not only for vision, but for other sensory modalities and even for a continuum that links sensory and limbic areas of the avian brain. Behavioral and neural studies must be integrated in order to understand how birds have developed their amazing visual systems through 150 million years of evolution.
subject
0Animals
1August 2010
2Biological Evolution
3Birds
4Birds - anatomy & histology
5Birds - physiology
6Brain Mapping
7Columbidae - anatomy & histology
8Columbidae - physiology
9Columnar organization
10Coturnix - anatomy & histology
11Coturnix - physiology
12Courtship
13Female
14genetic structures
15Limbic System - anatomy & histology
16Limbic System - physiology
17Male
18Paper
19Parallel processing
20Pattern Recognition, Visual - physiology
21Pigeons
22Primates
23Primates - anatomy & histology
24Primates - physiology
25Published
26Species Specificity
27Superior Colliculi - anatomy & histology
28Superior Colliculi - physiology
29Telencephalon - anatomy & histology
30Telencephalon - physiology
31Telencephalon - ultrastructure
32Visual Pathways - anatomy & histology
33Visual Pathways - physiology
34Visual Perception - physiology
issn
00006-8977
11421-9743
isbn
03805595808
19783805595803
29783805595810
33805595816
fulltexttrue
rsrctypearticle
creationdate2010
recordtypearticle
recordideNqFkk1vEzEQhs2XaCg58AfQigOIQ-j4276AmqpQpEq9FK7W7K43MWzs1LuJBL8et2kjWiFxsjTzvK887wwhryh8oFTaIwDgVDDDH5Gp1YYbkNJKQ-ExmZQ6nVkt-BPy4q4B5imZFJGaGav1AZkOQ6iBFYVUTD8nBww058yqCfl0vA0Yq-9h2GBfzf0StyHlCmNbjUtfXeQFxvAbx5Bilbqb2qXvfWz8eol9ii_Jsw77wU9v30Py7fPp5cnZ7Pziy9eT4_MZlYKNM8sstqapBYC1rGtNTblGhsYaieC1ZIrrBtqWC1RYg5BMiM6LznYNWMb5Ifm4811v6pVvGx_HjL1b57DC_MslDO5-J4alW6StYyUBq0wxONsZpLWPGLK_p22jH11qHVPagdGdagQyz2UttdAglWKclsCkVZ4Wq3e3f8npauOH0a3C0Pi-x-jTZnBaSsqpNuL_pLBAGVW2kG8ekD_SJscS6TVkjaBCFuj9DmpyGobsu_0MFNz1pbj9pRT29d-B7cm71Rfg6IFZE8abRZf8Qv9Py7c7xU_MC5_3lvP5KQMKoGVBGQj-B2lRyjY
startdate201008
enddate201008
creator
0Shimizu, Toru
1Patton, Tadd B
2Husband, Scott A
generalS. Karger AG
scope
0CGR
1CUY
2CVF
3ECM
4EIF
5NPM
6AAYXX
7CITATION
83V.
97QG
107TK
117X2
127X7
137XB
1488E
1588G
1688I
178AF
188AO
198FD
208FE
218FH
228FI
238FJ
248FK
25ABUWG
26ATCPS
27AZQEC
28BBNVY
29BEC
30BENPR
31BHPHI
32DWQXO
33FR3
34FYUFA
35GHDGH
36GNUQQ
37HCIFZ
38K9.
39LK8
40M0K
41M0S
42M1P
43M2M
44M2P
45M7P
46P64
47PATMY
48PQEST
49PQQKQ
50PQUKI
51PRINS
52PYCSY
53Q9U
54RC3
55S0X
567X8
57BOBZL
58CLFQK
595PM
sort
creationdate201008
titleAvian Visual Behavior and the Organization of the Telencephalon
authorShimizu, Toru ; Patton, Tadd B ; Husband, Scott A
facets
frbrtype5
frbrgroupidcdi_FETCH-LOGICAL-1542t-929ad8cb400992fd8b137a2a8985a0e752637c0dd34a6ab045244fe4f9fc09233
rsrctypearticles
prefilterarticles
languageeng
creationdate2010
topic
0Animals
1August 2010
2Biological Evolution
3Birds
4Birds - anatomy & histology
5Birds - physiology
6Brain Mapping
7Columbidae - anatomy & histology
8Columbidae - physiology
9Columnar organization
10Coturnix - anatomy & histology
11Coturnix - physiology
12Courtship
13Female
14genetic structures
15Limbic System - anatomy & histology
16Limbic System - physiology
17Male
18Paper
19Parallel processing
20Pattern Recognition, Visual - physiology
21Pigeons
22Primates
23Primates - anatomy & histology
24Primates - physiology
25Published
26Species Specificity
27Superior Colliculi - anatomy & histology
28Superior Colliculi - physiology
29Telencephalon - anatomy & histology
30Telencephalon - physiology
31Telencephalon - ultrastructure
32Visual Pathways - anatomy & histology
33Visual Pathways - physiology
34Visual Perception - physiology
toplevel
0peer_reviewed
1online_resources
creatorcontrib
0Shimizu, Toru
1Patton, Tadd B
2Husband, Scott A
collection
0Medline
1MEDLINE
2MEDLINE (Ovid)
3MEDLINE
4MEDLINE
5PubMed
6CrossRef
7ProQuest Central (Corporate)
8Animal Behavior Abstracts
9Neurosciences Abstracts
10Agricultural Science Collection
11Health & Medical Collection
12ProQuest Central (purchase pre-March 2016)
13Medical Database (Alumni Edition)
14Psychology Database (Alumni)
15Science Database (Alumni Edition)
16STEM Database
17ProQuest Pharma Collection
18Technology Research Database
19ProQuest SciTech Collection
20ProQuest Natural Science Collection
21Hospital Premium Collection
22Hospital Premium Collection (Alumni Edition)
23ProQuest Central (Alumni) (purchase pre-March 2016)
24ProQuest Central (Alumni Edition)
25Agricultural & Environmental Science Collection
26ProQuest Central Essentials
27Biological Science Collection
28eLibrary
29ProQuest Central
30Natural Science Collection
31ProQuest Central Korea
32Engineering Research Database
33Health Research Premium Collection
34Health Research Premium Collection (Alumni)
35ProQuest Central Student
36SciTech Premium Collection
37ProQuest Health & Medical Complete (Alumni)
38ProQuest Biological Science Collection
39Agricultural Science Database
40Health & Medical Collection (Alumni Edition)
41Medical Database
42Psychology Database
43Science Database
44Biological Science Database
45Biotechnology and BioEngineering Abstracts
46Environmental Science Database
47ProQuest One Academic Eastern Edition
48ProQuest One Academic
49ProQuest One Academic UKI Edition
50ProQuest Central China
51Environmental Science Collection
52ProQuest Central Basic
53Genetics Abstracts
54SIRS Editorial
55MEDLINE - Academic
56OpenAIRE (Open Access)
57OpenAIRE
58PubMed Central (Full Participant titles)
jtitleBrain, behavior and evolution
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextfulltext
addata
au
0Shimizu, Toru
1Patton, Tadd B
2Husband, Scott A
formatjournal
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
atitleAvian Visual Behavior and the Organization of the Telencephalon
jtitleBrain, behavior and evolution
addtitleBrain Behav Evol
date2010-08
risdate2010
volume75
issue3
spage204
epage217
pages204-217
issn0006-8977
eissn1421-9743
isbn
03805595808
19783805595803
eisbn
09783805595810
13805595816
codenBRBEBE
abstractBirds have excellent visual abilities that are comparable or superior to those of primates, but how the bird brain solves complex visual problems is poorly understood. More specifically, we lack knowledge about how such superb abilities are used in nature and how the brain, especially the telencephalon, is organized to process visual information. Here we review the results of several studies that examine the organization of the avian telencephalon and the relevance of visual abilities to avian social and reproductive behavior. Video playback and photographic stimuli show that birds can detect and evaluate subtle differences in local facial features of potential mates in a fashion similar to that of primates. These techniques have also revealed that birds do not attend well to global configural changes in the face, suggesting a fundamental difference between birds and primates in face perception. The telencephalon plays a major role in the visual and visuo-cognitive abilities of birds and primates, and anatomical data suggest that these animals may share similar organizational characteristics in the visual telencephalon. As is true in the primate cerebral cortex, different visual features are processed separately in the avian telencephalon where separate channels are organized in the anterior-posterior axis roughly parallel to the major laminae. Furthermore, the efferent projections from the primary visual telencephalon form an extensive column-like continuum involving the dorsolateral pallium and the lateral basal ganglia. Such a column-like organization may exist not only for vision, but for other sensory modalities and even for a continuum that links sensory and limbic areas of the avian brain. Behavioral and neural studies must be integrated in order to understand how birds have developed their amazing visual systems through 150 million years of evolution.
copBasel, Switzerland
pubS. Karger AG
pmid20733296
doi10.1159/000314283
tpages14
oafree_for_read