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Molecular Epidemiological Investigation of Plasmodium knowlesi in Humans and Macaques in Singapore

Singapore reported its first locally acquired human Plasmodium knowlesi infection in 2007, involving a soldier who had undergone training in a forested area where long-tailed macaques are frequently seen. Comprehensive disease surveillance and monitoring system that was set up after the initial case... Full description

Journal Title: Vector borne and zoonotic diseases (Larchmont N.Y.), 2011-02-01, Vol.11 (2), p.131-135
Main Author: Jeslyn, Wong Pei Sze
Other Authors: Huat, Tan Cheong , Vernon, Lee , Irene, Li Mei Zhi , Sung, Lee Kim , Jarrod, Lee Piao , Singh, Balbir , Ching, Ng Lee
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: United States: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc
ID: ISSN: 1530-3667
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20586605
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title: Molecular Epidemiological Investigation of Plasmodium knowlesi in Humans and Macaques in Singapore
format: Article
creator:
  • Jeslyn, Wong Pei Sze
  • Huat, Tan Cheong
  • Vernon, Lee
  • Irene, Li Mei Zhi
  • Sung, Lee Kim
  • Jarrod, Lee Piao
  • Singh, Balbir
  • Ching, Ng Lee
subjects:
  • Adult
  • Animals
  • Causes of
  • Circumsporozoite genes
  • Diagnosis
  • Epidemiology
  • Health aspects
  • Humans
  • long-tailed macaques
  • Macaca
  • Macaques
  • Malaria
  • Malaria - epidemiology
  • Malaria - parasitology
  • Malaria - transmission
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Molecular Epidemiology
  • Monkey Diseases - epidemiology
  • Monkey Diseases - parasitology
  • Monkey Diseases - transmission
  • Original
  • Original Articles
  • parasitic diseases
  • Phylogeny
  • Plasmodium
  • Plasmodium Knowlesi
  • Plasmodium knowlesi - classification
  • Plasmodium knowlesi - genetics
  • Plasmodium knowlesi - physiology
  • Protozoan Proteins - genetics
  • Research
  • Singapore
  • Young Adult
  • Zoonoses - epidemiology
  • Zoonoses - parasitology
  • Zoonoses - transmission
ispartof: Vector borne and zoonotic diseases (Larchmont, N.Y.), 2011-02-01, Vol.11 (2), p.131-135
description: Singapore reported its first locally acquired human Plasmodium knowlesi infection in 2007, involving a soldier who had undergone training in a forested area where long-tailed macaques are frequently seen. Comprehensive disease surveillance and monitoring system that was set up after the initial case detected four additional human P. knowlesi cases in 2007 and one in 2008. All involved military personnel who had undergone training in the forested area, and none had traveled out of Singapore 1 month before the onset of symptoms. Screening for malaria parasites on blood obtained from long-tailed macaques revealed that wild monkeys ( n  = 3) caught from the forested area were infected with P. knowlesi , whereas peri-domestic monkeys ( n  = 10) caught from a nature reserve park were not infected with any malaria parasites. Phylogenetic analysis of the nonrepeat region of the P. knowlesi csp genes showed that the sequences obtained from the human cases were not distinct from those obtained from wild monkeys. Further, certain genotypes were shared between samples from humans and macaques. Our findings provide evidence that long-tailed macaques are the natural hosts of P. knowlesi in Singapore and the human cases acquired their infection in the same vicinity where these monkeys are found. Further, the risk of acquiring P. knowlesi infection among the general population of Singapore is small as evident from the absence of P. knowlesi in peri-domestic monkeys.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 1530-3667
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 1530-3667
  • 1557-7759
url: Link


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creatorJeslyn, Wong Pei Sze ; Huat, Tan Cheong ; Vernon, Lee ; Irene, Li Mei Zhi ; Sung, Lee Kim ; Jarrod, Lee Piao ; Singh, Balbir ; Ching, Ng Lee
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descriptionSingapore reported its first locally acquired human Plasmodium knowlesi infection in 2007, involving a soldier who had undergone training in a forested area where long-tailed macaques are frequently seen. Comprehensive disease surveillance and monitoring system that was set up after the initial case detected four additional human P. knowlesi cases in 2007 and one in 2008. All involved military personnel who had undergone training in the forested area, and none had traveled out of Singapore 1 month before the onset of symptoms. Screening for malaria parasites on blood obtained from long-tailed macaques revealed that wild monkeys ( n  = 3) caught from the forested area were infected with P. knowlesi , whereas peri-domestic monkeys ( n  = 10) caught from a nature reserve park were not infected with any malaria parasites. Phylogenetic analysis of the nonrepeat region of the P. knowlesi csp genes showed that the sequences obtained from the human cases were not distinct from those obtained from wild monkeys. Further, certain genotypes were shared between samples from humans and macaques. Our findings provide evidence that long-tailed macaques are the natural hosts of P. knowlesi in Singapore and the human cases acquired their infection in the same vicinity where these monkeys are found. Further, the risk of acquiring P. knowlesi infection among the general population of Singapore is small as evident from the absence of P. knowlesi in peri-domestic monkeys.
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subjectAdult ; Animals ; Causes of ; Circumsporozoite genes ; Diagnosis ; Epidemiology ; Health aspects ; Humans ; long-tailed macaques ; Macaca ; Macaques ; Malaria ; Malaria - epidemiology ; Malaria - parasitology ; Malaria - transmission ; Male ; Middle Aged ; Molecular Epidemiology ; Monkey Diseases - epidemiology ; Monkey Diseases - parasitology ; Monkey Diseases - transmission ; Original ; Original Articles ; parasitic diseases ; Phylogeny ; Plasmodium ; Plasmodium Knowlesi ; Plasmodium knowlesi - classification ; Plasmodium knowlesi - genetics ; Plasmodium knowlesi - physiology ; Protozoan Proteins - genetics ; Research ; Singapore ; Young Adult ; Zoonoses - epidemiology ; Zoonoses - parasitology ; Zoonoses - transmission
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descriptionSingapore reported its first locally acquired human Plasmodium knowlesi infection in 2007, involving a soldier who had undergone training in a forested area where long-tailed macaques are frequently seen. Comprehensive disease surveillance and monitoring system that was set up after the initial case detected four additional human P. knowlesi cases in 2007 and one in 2008. All involved military personnel who had undergone training in the forested area, and none had traveled out of Singapore 1 month before the onset of symptoms. Screening for malaria parasites on blood obtained from long-tailed macaques revealed that wild monkeys ( n  = 3) caught from the forested area were infected with P. knowlesi , whereas peri-domestic monkeys ( n  = 10) caught from a nature reserve park were not infected with any malaria parasites. Phylogenetic analysis of the nonrepeat region of the P. knowlesi csp genes showed that the sequences obtained from the human cases were not distinct from those obtained from wild monkeys. Further, certain genotypes were shared between samples from humans and macaques. Our findings provide evidence that long-tailed macaques are the natural hosts of P. knowlesi in Singapore and the human cases acquired their infection in the same vicinity where these monkeys are found. Further, the risk of acquiring P. knowlesi infection among the general population of Singapore is small as evident from the absence of P. knowlesi in peri-domestic monkeys.
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30Protozoan Proteins - genetics
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authorJeslyn, Wong Pei Sze ; Huat, Tan Cheong ; Vernon, Lee ; Irene, Li Mei Zhi ; Sung, Lee Kim ; Jarrod, Lee Piao ; Singh, Balbir ; Ching, Ng Lee
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abstractSingapore reported its first locally acquired human Plasmodium knowlesi infection in 2007, involving a soldier who had undergone training in a forested area where long-tailed macaques are frequently seen. Comprehensive disease surveillance and monitoring system that was set up after the initial case detected four additional human P. knowlesi cases in 2007 and one in 2008. All involved military personnel who had undergone training in the forested area, and none had traveled out of Singapore 1 month before the onset of symptoms. Screening for malaria parasites on blood obtained from long-tailed macaques revealed that wild monkeys ( n  = 3) caught from the forested area were infected with P. knowlesi , whereas peri-domestic monkeys ( n  = 10) caught from a nature reserve park were not infected with any malaria parasites. Phylogenetic analysis of the nonrepeat region of the P. knowlesi csp genes showed that the sequences obtained from the human cases were not distinct from those obtained from wild monkeys. Further, certain genotypes were shared between samples from humans and macaques. Our findings provide evidence that long-tailed macaques are the natural hosts of P. knowlesi in Singapore and the human cases acquired their infection in the same vicinity where these monkeys are found. Further, the risk of acquiring P. knowlesi infection among the general population of Singapore is small as evident from the absence of P. knowlesi in peri-domestic monkeys.
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