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Entomological Investigation and Control of a Chikungunya Cluster in Singapore

In August 2008, a team from the National Environmental Agency conducted an entomological investigation of a chikungunya cluster in Singapore, with the primary aim of identifying the vector responsible for the outbreak and to assess the vector control operation. A total of 173 adult mosquitoes were c... Full description

Journal Title: Vector borne and zoonotic diseases (Larchmont N.Y.), 2011, Vol.11 (4), p.383-390
Main Author: Tan, Cheong Huat
Other Authors: Wong, Pei Sze Jeslyn , Li, Mei Zhi Irene , Tan, Siok Yin Sharon , Lee, Tze Kwang Caleb , Pang, Sook Cheng , Lam-Phua, Sai Gek , Maideen, Nasir , Png, Ah Bah , Koou, Sin Ying , Lu, Deng , Ng, Lee-Ching
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: United States: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc
ID: ISSN: 1530-3667
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21395419
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recordid: cdi_pubmedcentral_primary_oai_pubmedcentral_nih_gov_3129687
title: Entomological Investigation and Control of a Chikungunya Cluster in Singapore
format: Article
creator:
  • Tan, Cheong Huat
  • Wong, Pei Sze Jeslyn
  • Li, Mei Zhi Irene
  • Tan, Siok Yin Sharon
  • Lee, Tze Kwang Caleb
  • Pang, Sook Cheng
  • Lam-Phua, Sai Gek
  • Maideen, Nasir
  • Png, Ah Bah
  • Koou, Sin Ying
  • Lu, Deng
  • Ng, Lee-Ching
subjects:
  • Aedes - virology
  • Aedes albopictus
  • Alphavirus Infections - epidemiology
  • Alphavirus Infections - prevention & control
  • Alphavirus Infections - transmission
  • Animals
  • Anopheles
  • Chikungunya
  • Chikungunya Fever
  • Chikungunya virus - genetics
  • Chikungunya virus - isolation & purification
  • Cluster Analysis
  • Culex - virology
  • Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control
  • Disease transmission
  • Entomology
  • Female
  • fungi
  • Health aspects
  • Humans
  • Insect Vectors - virology
  • Male
  • Mosquito Control - methods
  • Mosquito Nets
  • Original
  • Original Articles
  • parasitic diseases
  • Pirimiphos-methyl
  • Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
  • Risk factors
  • Sequence Analysis
  • Singapore
  • Singapore - epidemiology
  • Vector control
  • virus diseases
  • viruses
ispartof: Vector borne and zoonotic diseases (Larchmont, N.Y.), 2011, Vol.11 (4), p.383-390
description: In August 2008, a team from the National Environmental Agency conducted an entomological investigation of a chikungunya cluster in Singapore, with the primary aim of identifying the vector responsible for the outbreak and to assess the vector control operation. A total of 173 adult mosquitoes were caught using both the sweep-net method and the BG Sentinel Traps in and around the affected workers' quarters. Of these, 120 (69.4%) were Aedes albopictus and the rest were Culex quinquefasciatus . More than 2700 Ae. albopictus larvae were also collected from 33 breeding habitats detected. No Aedes aegypti was found. During the preintervention period, 6 (8.4%) out of 71 adult female Ae. albopictus were found positive for the chikungunya virus (CHIKV). Vector control measures resulted in a 90% reduction of adult Ae. albopictus caught by BG Sentinel Traps. Postintervention surveillance revealed the presence of CHIKV-positive mosquitoes. These findings led to continued intensive vector control operation in the affected area that further reduced vector population and interrupted the transmission of the disease. The E1 gene sequence of the CHIKV was identical to those of CHIKV isolated from human chikungunya cases working in the affected area, and contained the A226V mutation. The incrimination of Ae. albopictus as a major vector involved in the transmission of A226V CHIKV had led to the revision of chikungunya control strategy in Singapore. This study suggests the benefit of a vector control program that includes the evaluation of control measures in conjunction to virological surveillance in vector population.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 1530-3667
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 1530-3667
  • 1557-7759
url: Link


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titleEntomological Investigation and Control of a Chikungunya Cluster in Singapore
creatorTan, Cheong Huat ; Wong, Pei Sze Jeslyn ; Li, Mei Zhi Irene ; Tan, Siok Yin Sharon ; Lee, Tze Kwang Caleb ; Pang, Sook Cheng ; Lam-Phua, Sai Gek ; Maideen, Nasir ; Png, Ah Bah ; Koou, Sin Ying ; Lu, Deng ; Ng, Lee-Ching
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descriptionIn August 2008, a team from the National Environmental Agency conducted an entomological investigation of a chikungunya cluster in Singapore, with the primary aim of identifying the vector responsible for the outbreak and to assess the vector control operation. A total of 173 adult mosquitoes were caught using both the sweep-net method and the BG Sentinel Traps in and around the affected workers' quarters. Of these, 120 (69.4%) were Aedes albopictus and the rest were Culex quinquefasciatus . More than 2700 Ae. albopictus larvae were also collected from 33 breeding habitats detected. No Aedes aegypti was found. During the preintervention period, 6 (8.4%) out of 71 adult female Ae. albopictus were found positive for the chikungunya virus (CHIKV). Vector control measures resulted in a 90% reduction of adult Ae. albopictus caught by BG Sentinel Traps. Postintervention surveillance revealed the presence of CHIKV-positive mosquitoes. These findings led to continued intensive vector control operation in the affected area that further reduced vector population and interrupted the transmission of the disease. The E1 gene sequence of the CHIKV was identical to those of CHIKV isolated from human chikungunya cases working in the affected area, and contained the A226V mutation. The incrimination of Ae. albopictus as a major vector involved in the transmission of A226V CHIKV had led to the revision of chikungunya control strategy in Singapore. This study suggests the benefit of a vector control program that includes the evaluation of control measures in conjunction to virological surveillance in vector population.
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subjectAedes - virology ; Aedes albopictus ; Alphavirus Infections - epidemiology ; Alphavirus Infections - prevention & control ; Alphavirus Infections - transmission ; Animals ; Anopheles ; Chikungunya ; Chikungunya Fever ; Chikungunya virus - genetics ; Chikungunya virus - isolation & purification ; Cluster Analysis ; Culex - virology ; Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control ; Disease transmission ; Entomology ; Female ; fungi ; Health aspects ; Humans ; Insect Vectors - virology ; Male ; Mosquito Control - methods ; Mosquito Nets ; Original ; Original Articles ; parasitic diseases ; Pirimiphos-methyl ; Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction ; Risk factors ; Sequence Analysis ; Singapore ; Singapore - epidemiology ; Vector control ; virus diseases ; viruses
ispartofVector borne and zoonotic diseases (Larchmont, N.Y.), 2011, Vol.11 (4), p.383-390
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6Lam-Phua, Sai Gek
7Maideen, Nasir
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descriptionIn August 2008, a team from the National Environmental Agency conducted an entomological investigation of a chikungunya cluster in Singapore, with the primary aim of identifying the vector responsible for the outbreak and to assess the vector control operation. A total of 173 adult mosquitoes were caught using both the sweep-net method and the BG Sentinel Traps in and around the affected workers' quarters. Of these, 120 (69.4%) were Aedes albopictus and the rest were Culex quinquefasciatus . More than 2700 Ae. albopictus larvae were also collected from 33 breeding habitats detected. No Aedes aegypti was found. During the preintervention period, 6 (8.4%) out of 71 adult female Ae. albopictus were found positive for the chikungunya virus (CHIKV). Vector control measures resulted in a 90% reduction of adult Ae. albopictus caught by BG Sentinel Traps. Postintervention surveillance revealed the presence of CHIKV-positive mosquitoes. These findings led to continued intensive vector control operation in the affected area that further reduced vector population and interrupted the transmission of the disease. The E1 gene sequence of the CHIKV was identical to those of CHIKV isolated from human chikungunya cases working in the affected area, and contained the A226V mutation. The incrimination of Ae. albopictus as a major vector involved in the transmission of A226V CHIKV had led to the revision of chikungunya control strategy in Singapore. This study suggests the benefit of a vector control program that includes the evaluation of control measures in conjunction to virological surveillance in vector population.
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0Aedes - virology
1Aedes albopictus
2Alphavirus Infections - epidemiology
3Alphavirus Infections - prevention & control
4Alphavirus Infections - transmission
5Animals
6Anopheles
7Chikungunya
8Chikungunya Fever
9Chikungunya virus - genetics
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12Culex - virology
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16Female
17fungi
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20Insect Vectors - virology
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28Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
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30Sequence Analysis
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34virus diseases
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authorTan, Cheong Huat ; Wong, Pei Sze Jeslyn ; Li, Mei Zhi Irene ; Tan, Siok Yin Sharon ; Lee, Tze Kwang Caleb ; Pang, Sook Cheng ; Lam-Phua, Sai Gek ; Maideen, Nasir ; Png, Ah Bah ; Koou, Sin Ying ; Lu, Deng ; Ng, Lee-Ching
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abstractIn August 2008, a team from the National Environmental Agency conducted an entomological investigation of a chikungunya cluster in Singapore, with the primary aim of identifying the vector responsible for the outbreak and to assess the vector control operation. A total of 173 adult mosquitoes were caught using both the sweep-net method and the BG Sentinel Traps in and around the affected workers' quarters. Of these, 120 (69.4%) were Aedes albopictus and the rest were Culex quinquefasciatus . More than 2700 Ae. albopictus larvae were also collected from 33 breeding habitats detected. No Aedes aegypti was found. During the preintervention period, 6 (8.4%) out of 71 adult female Ae. albopictus were found positive for the chikungunya virus (CHIKV). Vector control measures resulted in a 90% reduction of adult Ae. albopictus caught by BG Sentinel Traps. Postintervention surveillance revealed the presence of CHIKV-positive mosquitoes. These findings led to continued intensive vector control operation in the affected area that further reduced vector population and interrupted the transmission of the disease. The E1 gene sequence of the CHIKV was identical to those of CHIKV isolated from human chikungunya cases working in the affected area, and contained the A226V mutation. The incrimination of Ae. albopictus as a major vector involved in the transmission of A226V CHIKV had led to the revision of chikungunya control strategy in Singapore. This study suggests the benefit of a vector control program that includes the evaluation of control measures in conjunction to virological surveillance in vector population.
copUnited States
pubMary Ann Liebert, Inc
pmid21395419
doi10.1089/vbz.2010.0022
oafree_for_read