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Testing the priority-of-access model in a seasonally breeding primate species

In mammals, when females are clumped in space, male access to receptive females is usually determined by a dominance hierarchy based on fighting ability. In polygynandrous primates, as opposed to most mammalian species, the strength of the relationship between male social status and reproductive suc... Full description

Journal Title: Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology 2011, Vol.65 (8), p.1615-1627
Main Author: Dubuc, Constance
Other Authors: Muniz, Laura , Heistermann, Michael , Engelhardt, Antje , Widdig, Anja
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Poa
Publisher: Berlin/Heidelberg: Springer
ID: ISSN: 0340-5443
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21874084
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recordid: cdi_pubmedcentral_primary_oai_pubmedcentral_nih_gov_3134767
title: Testing the priority-of-access model in a seasonally breeding primate species
format: Article
creator:
  • Dubuc, Constance
  • Muniz, Laura
  • Heistermann, Michael
  • Engelhardt, Antje
  • Widdig, Anja
subjects:
  • access model
  • Analysis
  • Animal behavior
  • Animal Ecology
  • Animal Science
  • Behavior
  • Behavioral Sciences
  • Behavioural Sciences
  • Biomedical and Life Sciences
  • Breeding of animals
  • Breeding seasons
  • Degree of synchrony
  • Dominance
  • Ecology
  • Evolution
  • Evolutionary Biology
  • Female animals
  • Genetic paternity analysis
  • Human sexual behavior
  • Infants
  • Life Sciences
  • Macaca mulatta
  • Male animals
  • Mating behavior
  • Mating skew
  • Modeling
  • Original Paper
  • Poa
  • Primates
  • Priority
  • Priority-of-access model
  • Reproductive skew
  • Reproductive success
  • Rhesus macaques
  • Seasons
  • Sexual behavior
  • Social behavior
  • Systematics
  • Universities and colleges
  • Zoology
ispartof: Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 2011, Vol.65 (8), p.1615-1627
description: In mammals, when females are clumped in space, male access to receptive females is usually determined by a dominance hierarchy based on fighting ability. In polygynandrous primates, as opposed to most mammalian species, the strength of the relationship between male social status and reproductive success varies greatly. It has been proposed that the degree to which paternity is determined by male rank decreases with increasing female reproductive synchrony. The priority-of-access model (PoA) predicts male reproductive success based on female synchrony and male dominance rank. To date, most tests of the PoA using paternity data involved nonseasonally breeding species. Here, we examine whether the PoA explains the relatively low reproductive skew in relation to dominance rank reported in the rhesus macaque, a strictly seasonal species. We collected behavioral, genetic, and hormonal data on one group of the free-ranging population on Cayo Santiago (Puerto Rico) for 2 years. The PoA correctly predicted the steepness of male reproductive skew, but not its relationship to male dominance: the most successful sire, fathering one third of the infants, was high but not top ranking. In contrast, mating success was not significantly skewed, suggesting that other mechanisms than social status contributed to male reproductive success. Dominance may be less important for paternity in rhesus macaques than in other primate species because it is reached through queuing rather than contest, leading to alpha males not necessarily being the strongest or most attractive male. More work is needed to fully elucidate the mechanisms determining paternity in rhesus macaques.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0340-5443
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0340-5443
  • 1432-0762
url: Link


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descriptionIn mammals, when females are clumped in space, male access to receptive females is usually determined by a dominance hierarchy based on fighting ability. In polygynandrous primates, as opposed to most mammalian species, the strength of the relationship between male social status and reproductive success varies greatly. It has been proposed that the degree to which paternity is determined by male rank decreases with increasing female reproductive synchrony. The priority-of-access model (PoA) predicts male reproductive success based on female synchrony and male dominance rank. To date, most tests of the PoA using paternity data involved nonseasonally breeding species. Here, we examine whether the PoA explains the relatively low reproductive skew in relation to dominance rank reported in the rhesus macaque, a strictly seasonal species. We collected behavioral, genetic, and hormonal data on one group of the free-ranging population on Cayo Santiago (Puerto Rico) for 2 years. The PoA correctly predicted the steepness of male reproductive skew, but not its relationship to male dominance: the most successful sire, fathering one third of the infants, was high but not top ranking. In contrast, mating success was not significantly skewed, suggesting that other mechanisms than social status contributed to male reproductive success. Dominance may be less important for paternity in rhesus macaques than in other primate species because it is reached through queuing rather than contest, leading to alpha males not necessarily being the strongest or most attractive male. More work is needed to fully elucidate the mechanisms determining paternity in rhesus macaques.
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subjectaccess model ; Analysis ; Animal behavior ; Animal Ecology ; Animal Science ; Behavior ; Behavioral Sciences ; Behavioural Sciences ; Biomedical and Life Sciences ; Breeding of animals ; Breeding seasons ; Degree of synchrony ; Dominance ; Ecology ; Evolution ; Evolutionary Biology ; Female animals ; Genetic paternity analysis ; Human sexual behavior ; Infants ; Life Sciences ; Macaca mulatta ; Male animals ; Mating behavior ; Mating skew ; Modeling ; Original Paper ; Poa ; Primates ; Priority ; Priority-of-access model ; Reproductive skew ; Reproductive success ; Rhesus macaques ; Seasons ; Sexual behavior ; Social behavior ; Systematics ; Universities and colleges ; Zoology
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descriptionIn mammals, when females are clumped in space, male access to receptive females is usually determined by a dominance hierarchy based on fighting ability. In polygynandrous primates, as opposed to most mammalian species, the strength of the relationship between male social status and reproductive success varies greatly. It has been proposed that the degree to which paternity is determined by male rank decreases with increasing female reproductive synchrony. The priority-of-access model (PoA) predicts male reproductive success based on female synchrony and male dominance rank. To date, most tests of the PoA using paternity data involved nonseasonally breeding species. Here, we examine whether the PoA explains the relatively low reproductive skew in relation to dominance rank reported in the rhesus macaque, a strictly seasonal species. We collected behavioral, genetic, and hormonal data on one group of the free-ranging population on Cayo Santiago (Puerto Rico) for 2 years. The PoA correctly predicted the steepness of male reproductive skew, but not its relationship to male dominance: the most successful sire, fathering one third of the infants, was high but not top ranking. In contrast, mating success was not significantly skewed, suggesting that other mechanisms than social status contributed to male reproductive success. Dominance may be less important for paternity in rhesus macaques than in other primate species because it is reached through queuing rather than contest, leading to alpha males not necessarily being the strongest or most attractive male. More work is needed to fully elucidate the mechanisms determining paternity in rhesus macaques.
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atitleTesting the priority-of-access model in a seasonally breeding primate species
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abstractIn mammals, when females are clumped in space, male access to receptive females is usually determined by a dominance hierarchy based on fighting ability. In polygynandrous primates, as opposed to most mammalian species, the strength of the relationship between male social status and reproductive success varies greatly. It has been proposed that the degree to which paternity is determined by male rank decreases with increasing female reproductive synchrony. The priority-of-access model (PoA) predicts male reproductive success based on female synchrony and male dominance rank. To date, most tests of the PoA using paternity data involved nonseasonally breeding species. Here, we examine whether the PoA explains the relatively low reproductive skew in relation to dominance rank reported in the rhesus macaque, a strictly seasonal species. We collected behavioral, genetic, and hormonal data on one group of the free-ranging population on Cayo Santiago (Puerto Rico) for 2 years. The PoA correctly predicted the steepness of male reproductive skew, but not its relationship to male dominance: the most successful sire, fathering one third of the infants, was high but not top ranking. In contrast, mating success was not significantly skewed, suggesting that other mechanisms than social status contributed to male reproductive success. Dominance may be less important for paternity in rhesus macaques than in other primate species because it is reached through queuing rather than contest, leading to alpha males not necessarily being the strongest or most attractive male. More work is needed to fully elucidate the mechanisms determining paternity in rhesus macaques.
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