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Modifiable risk factors for prostate cancer mortality in London: forty years of follow-up in the Whitehall study

Background: The determinants of prostate cancer—aside from established but non-modifiable risk factors of increased age, black ethnicity, and a positive family history— are poorly understood. Methods: We examined the association of a series of baseline socioeconomic, behavioral, and metabolic charac... Full description

Journal Title: Cancer causes & control 2011, Vol.22 (2), p.311-318
Main Author: Batty, G. David
Other Authors: Kivimäki, Mika , Clarke, Robert , Davey Smith, George , Shipley, Martin J
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: Dordrecht: Springer
ID: ISSN: 0957-5243
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21116843
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recordid: cdi_pubmedcentral_primary_oai_pubmedcentral_nih_gov_3226949
title: Modifiable risk factors for prostate cancer mortality in London: forty years of follow-up in the Whitehall study
format: Article
creator:
  • Batty, G. David
  • Kivimäki, Mika
  • Clarke, Robert
  • Davey Smith, George
  • Shipley, Martin J
subjects:
  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Article
  • Biomedical and Life Sciences
  • Biomedicine
  • Blood plasma
  • Body mass index
  • BRIEF REPORT
  • Cancer Research
  • Carcinoma - epidemiology
  • Carcinoma - mortality
  • Cholesterols
  • Cohort Studies
  • Death
  • Demographic aspects
  • Diabetes
  • Effect Modifier, Epidemiologic
  • Epidemiology
  • Exercise
  • Follow-Up Studies
  • general
  • Hematology
  • Humans
  • London - epidemiology
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Mortality
  • Oncology
  • P values
  • Patient outcomes
  • Predisposing factors
  • Prostate cancer
  • Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology
  • Prostatic Neoplasms - mortality
  • Public Health
  • Risk Factors
  • Time Factors
ispartof: Cancer causes & control, 2011, Vol.22 (2), p.311-318
description: Background: The determinants of prostate cancer—aside from established but non-modifiable risk factors of increased age, black ethnicity, and a positive family history— are poorly understood. Methods: We examined the association of a series of baseline socioeconomic, behavioral, and metabolic characteristics with the risk of prostate cancer mortality in a 40-year follow-up of study members from the original Whitehall cohort study. During this period there were 578 prostate cancer deaths in 17,934 men. Results: After adjustment for a series of baseline covariates, results from proportional hazards regression analyses indicated that marital status (hazard ratio; 95% confidence interval: widowed/divorced vs. married: 1.44; 0.95, 2.18), raised blood cholesterol (tertile 3 vs. 1: 1.35; 1.11,1.65), and increased physical stature (tertile 3 vs. 1: 1.37; 1.09, 1.74) were associated with death from prostate cancer, although statistical significance at conventional levels was not apparent in all analyses. There was no evidence that physical activity, smoking habit, socio-economic status, component of either blood pressure or diabetes predicted the risk of death from this malignancy herein. Conclusions: In the present study, there was a suggestion that marital status, blood cholesterol, and height were risk indices for death from prostate cancer.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0957-5243
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0957-5243
  • 1573-7225
url: Link


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titleModifiable risk factors for prostate cancer mortality in London: forty years of follow-up in the Whitehall study
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creatorcontribBatty, G. David ; Kivimäki, Mika ; Clarke, Robert ; Davey Smith, George ; Shipley, Martin J
descriptionBackground: The determinants of prostate cancer—aside from established but non-modifiable risk factors of increased age, black ethnicity, and a positive family history— are poorly understood. Methods: We examined the association of a series of baseline socioeconomic, behavioral, and metabolic characteristics with the risk of prostate cancer mortality in a 40-year follow-up of study members from the original Whitehall cohort study. During this period there were 578 prostate cancer deaths in 17,934 men. Results: After adjustment for a series of baseline covariates, results from proportional hazards regression analyses indicated that marital status (hazard ratio; 95% confidence interval: widowed/divorced vs. married: 1.44; 0.95, 2.18), raised blood cholesterol (tertile 3 vs. 1: 1.35; 1.11,1.65), and increased physical stature (tertile 3 vs. 1: 1.37; 1.09, 1.74) were associated with death from prostate cancer, although statistical significance at conventional levels was not apparent in all analyses. There was no evidence that physical activity, smoking habit, socio-economic status, component of either blood pressure or diabetes predicted the risk of death from this malignancy herein. Conclusions: In the present study, there was a suggestion that marital status, blood cholesterol, and height were risk indices for death from prostate cancer.
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descriptionBackground: The determinants of prostate cancer—aside from established but non-modifiable risk factors of increased age, black ethnicity, and a positive family history— are poorly understood. Methods: We examined the association of a series of baseline socioeconomic, behavioral, and metabolic characteristics with the risk of prostate cancer mortality in a 40-year follow-up of study members from the original Whitehall cohort study. During this period there were 578 prostate cancer deaths in 17,934 men. Results: After adjustment for a series of baseline covariates, results from proportional hazards regression analyses indicated that marital status (hazard ratio; 95% confidence interval: widowed/divorced vs. married: 1.44; 0.95, 2.18), raised blood cholesterol (tertile 3 vs. 1: 1.35; 1.11,1.65), and increased physical stature (tertile 3 vs. 1: 1.37; 1.09, 1.74) were associated with death from prostate cancer, although statistical significance at conventional levels was not apparent in all analyses. There was no evidence that physical activity, smoking habit, socio-economic status, component of either blood pressure or diabetes predicted the risk of death from this malignancy herein. Conclusions: In the present study, there was a suggestion that marital status, blood cholesterol, and height were risk indices for death from prostate cancer.
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abstractBackground: The determinants of prostate cancer—aside from established but non-modifiable risk factors of increased age, black ethnicity, and a positive family history— are poorly understood. Methods: We examined the association of a series of baseline socioeconomic, behavioral, and metabolic characteristics with the risk of prostate cancer mortality in a 40-year follow-up of study members from the original Whitehall cohort study. During this period there were 578 prostate cancer deaths in 17,934 men. Results: After adjustment for a series of baseline covariates, results from proportional hazards regression analyses indicated that marital status (hazard ratio; 95% confidence interval: widowed/divorced vs. married: 1.44; 0.95, 2.18), raised blood cholesterol (tertile 3 vs. 1: 1.35; 1.11,1.65), and increased physical stature (tertile 3 vs. 1: 1.37; 1.09, 1.74) were associated with death from prostate cancer, although statistical significance at conventional levels was not apparent in all analyses. There was no evidence that physical activity, smoking habit, socio-economic status, component of either blood pressure or diabetes predicted the risk of death from this malignancy herein. Conclusions: In the present study, there was a suggestion that marital status, blood cholesterol, and height were risk indices for death from prostate cancer.
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