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Efficiency of CCR5 Coreceptor Utilization by the HIV Quasispecies Increases over Time, But Is Not Associated with Disease Progression

CCR5 is the primary coreceptor for HIV entry. Early after infection, the HIV viral population diversifies rapidly into a quasispecies. It is not known whether the initial efficiency of the viral quasispecies to utilize CCR5 is associated with HIV disease progression or if it changes in an infected i... Full description

Journal Title: AIDS research and human retroviruses 2012, Vol.28 (3), p.289-294
Main Author: Redd, Andrew D.
Other Authors: Laeyendecker, Oliver , Kong, Xiangrong , Kiwanuka, Noah , Lutalo, Tom , Huang, Wei , Gray, Ronald H. , Wawer, Maria J. , Serwadda, David , Eshleman, Susan H. , Quinn, on behalf of the Rakai Health Sciences Program, Thomas C.
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: New Rochelle, NY: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc
ID: ISSN: 0889-2229
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title: Efficiency of CCR5 Coreceptor Utilization by the HIV Quasispecies Increases over Time, But Is Not Associated with Disease Progression
format: Article
creator:
  • Redd, Andrew D.
  • Laeyendecker, Oliver
  • Kong, Xiangrong
  • Kiwanuka, Noah
  • Lutalo, Tom
  • Huang, Wei
  • Gray, Ronald H.
  • Wawer, Maria J.
  • Serwadda, David
  • Eshleman, Susan H.
  • Quinn, on behalf of the Rakai Health Sciences Program, Thomas C.
subjects:
  • Adult
  • AIDS/HIV
  • Biological and medical sciences
  • CCR5 protein
  • CD4 Lymphocyte Count
  • CXCR4 protein
  • Data processing
  • Disease Progression
  • Female
  • Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology
  • HIV Envelope Protein gp120 - metabolism
  • HIV Seropositivity - epidemiology
  • HIV Seropositivity - metabolism
  • HIV-1
  • Host-Pathogen Interactions
  • Human immunodeficiency virus
  • Human viral diseases
  • Humans
  • Infection
  • Infectious diseases
  • Longitudinal Studies
  • Male
  • Medical sciences
  • Microbiology
  • Middle Aged
  • Miscellaneous
  • Pathogenesis
  • Proportional Hazards Models
  • Receptors, CCR5 - metabolism
  • Receptors, CXCR4 - metabolism
  • Retrovirus
  • Seroconversion
  • Uganda - epidemiology
  • Viral diseases
  • Virology
  • virus diseases
ispartof: AIDS research and human retroviruses, 2012, Vol.28 (3), p.289-294
description: CCR5 is the primary coreceptor for HIV entry. Early after infection, the HIV viral population diversifies rapidly into a quasispecies. It is not known whether the initial efficiency of the viral quasispecies to utilize CCR5 is associated with HIV disease progression or if it changes in an infected individual over time. The CCR5 and CXCR4 utilization efficiencies (R5-UE and X4-UE) of the HIV quasispecies were examined using a pseudovirus, single-round infection assay for samples obtained from known seroconverters from Rakai district, Uganda ( n =88). Initial and longitudinal R5-UE values were examined to assess the association of R5-UE with HIV disease progression using multivariate Cox proportional hazard models. Longitudinal samples were analyzed for 35 seroconverters who had samples available from multiple time points. There was no association between initial or longitudinal changes in R5-UE and the hazard of HIV disease progression ( p =0.225 and p =0.942, respectively). In addition, R5-UE increased significantly over time after HIV seroconversion ( p
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 0889-2229
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0889-2229
  • 1931-8405
url: Link


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titleEfficiency of CCR5 Coreceptor Utilization by the HIV Quasispecies Increases over Time, But Is Not Associated with Disease Progression
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creatorRedd, Andrew D. ; Laeyendecker, Oliver ; Kong, Xiangrong ; Kiwanuka, Noah ; Lutalo, Tom ; Huang, Wei ; Gray, Ronald H. ; Wawer, Maria J. ; Serwadda, David ; Eshleman, Susan H. ; Quinn, on behalf of the Rakai Health Sciences Program, Thomas C.
creatorcontribRedd, Andrew D. ; Laeyendecker, Oliver ; Kong, Xiangrong ; Kiwanuka, Noah ; Lutalo, Tom ; Huang, Wei ; Gray, Ronald H. ; Wawer, Maria J. ; Serwadda, David ; Eshleman, Susan H. ; Quinn, on behalf of the Rakai Health Sciences Program, Thomas C. ; Rakai Health Sciences Program
descriptionCCR5 is the primary coreceptor for HIV entry. Early after infection, the HIV viral population diversifies rapidly into a quasispecies. It is not known whether the initial efficiency of the viral quasispecies to utilize CCR5 is associated with HIV disease progression or if it changes in an infected individual over time. The CCR5 and CXCR4 utilization efficiencies (R5-UE and X4-UE) of the HIV quasispecies were examined using a pseudovirus, single-round infection assay for samples obtained from known seroconverters from Rakai district, Uganda ( n =88). Initial and longitudinal R5-UE values were examined to assess the association of R5-UE with HIV disease progression using multivariate Cox proportional hazard models. Longitudinal samples were analyzed for 35 seroconverters who had samples available from multiple time points. There was no association between initial or longitudinal changes in R5-UE and the hazard of HIV disease progression ( p =0.225 and p =0.942, respectively). In addition, R5-UE increased significantly over time after HIV seroconversion ( p <0.001), regardless of HIV subtype or the emergence of CXCR4-tropic virus. These data demonstrate that the R5-UE of the viral quasispecies early in HIV infection is not associated with disease progression, and that R5-UE levels increase in HIV-infected individuals over time.
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subjectAdult ; AIDS/HIV ; Biological and medical sciences ; CCR5 protein ; CD4 Lymphocyte Count ; CXCR4 protein ; Data processing ; Disease Progression ; Female ; Fundamental and applied biological sciences. Psychology ; HIV Envelope Protein gp120 - metabolism ; HIV Seropositivity - epidemiology ; HIV Seropositivity - metabolism ; HIV-1 ; Host-Pathogen Interactions ; Human immunodeficiency virus ; Human viral diseases ; Humans ; Infection ; Infectious diseases ; Longitudinal Studies ; Male ; Medical sciences ; Microbiology ; Middle Aged ; Miscellaneous ; Pathogenesis ; Proportional Hazards Models ; Receptors, CCR5 - metabolism ; Receptors, CXCR4 - metabolism ; Retrovirus ; Seroconversion ; Uganda - epidemiology ; Viral diseases ; Virology ; virus diseases
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descriptionCCR5 is the primary coreceptor for HIV entry. Early after infection, the HIV viral population diversifies rapidly into a quasispecies. It is not known whether the initial efficiency of the viral quasispecies to utilize CCR5 is associated with HIV disease progression or if it changes in an infected individual over time. The CCR5 and CXCR4 utilization efficiencies (R5-UE and X4-UE) of the HIV quasispecies were examined using a pseudovirus, single-round infection assay for samples obtained from known seroconverters from Rakai district, Uganda ( n =88). Initial and longitudinal R5-UE values were examined to assess the association of R5-UE with HIV disease progression using multivariate Cox proportional hazard models. Longitudinal samples were analyzed for 35 seroconverters who had samples available from multiple time points. There was no association between initial or longitudinal changes in R5-UE and the hazard of HIV disease progression ( p =0.225 and p =0.942, respectively). In addition, R5-UE increased significantly over time after HIV seroconversion ( p <0.001), regardless of HIV subtype or the emergence of CXCR4-tropic virus. These data demonstrate that the R5-UE of the viral quasispecies early in HIV infection is not associated with disease progression, and that R5-UE levels increase in HIV-infected individuals over time.
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titleEfficiency of CCR5 Coreceptor Utilization by the HIV Quasispecies Increases over Time, But Is Not Associated with Disease Progression
authorRedd, Andrew D. ; Laeyendecker, Oliver ; Kong, Xiangrong ; Kiwanuka, Noah ; Lutalo, Tom ; Huang, Wei ; Gray, Ronald H. ; Wawer, Maria J. ; Serwadda, David ; Eshleman, Susan H. ; Quinn, on behalf of the Rakai Health Sciences Program, Thomas C.
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abstractCCR5 is the primary coreceptor for HIV entry. Early after infection, the HIV viral population diversifies rapidly into a quasispecies. It is not known whether the initial efficiency of the viral quasispecies to utilize CCR5 is associated with HIV disease progression or if it changes in an infected individual over time. The CCR5 and CXCR4 utilization efficiencies (R5-UE and X4-UE) of the HIV quasispecies were examined using a pseudovirus, single-round infection assay for samples obtained from known seroconverters from Rakai district, Uganda ( n =88). Initial and longitudinal R5-UE values were examined to assess the association of R5-UE with HIV disease progression using multivariate Cox proportional hazard models. Longitudinal samples were analyzed for 35 seroconverters who had samples available from multiple time points. There was no association between initial or longitudinal changes in R5-UE and the hazard of HIV disease progression ( p =0.225 and p =0.942, respectively). In addition, R5-UE increased significantly over time after HIV seroconversion ( p <0.001), regardless of HIV subtype or the emergence of CXCR4-tropic virus. These data demonstrate that the R5-UE of the viral quasispecies early in HIV infection is not associated with disease progression, and that R5-UE levels increase in HIV-infected individuals over time.
copNew Rochelle, NY
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pmid21663455
doi10.1089/aid.2011.0006
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