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Better Off Jobless? Scarring Effects of Contingent Employment in Japan

Previous research fails to address whether contingent employment benefits individuals' careers more than the alternative they often face: being without a job. Using work history data from Japan, this study shows that accepting a contingent job delays individuals' transition to standard employment mo... Full description

Journal Title: Social forces 2012-03-01, Vol.90 (3), p.735-768
Main Author: Yu, Wei-hsin
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Men
Quelle: Alma/SFX Local Collection
Publisher: Chapel Hill, NC: Oxford University Press
ID: ISSN: 0037-7732
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recordid: cdi_pubmedcentral_primary_oai_pubmedcentral_nih_gov_3408094
title: Better Off Jobless? Scarring Effects of Contingent Employment in Japan
format: Article
creator:
  • Yu, Wei-hsin
subjects:
  • Article
  • CAREERS
  • Contract labor
  • Educational standards
  • Employment
  • Japan
  • Labor Market
  • Labor markets
  • Labour market
  • Males
  • Men
  • Modeling
  • Part-time employment
  • Research
  • Scope of employment
  • Seasonal labor
  • Self employment
  • Sociology
  • Sociology of work
  • Sociology of work and sociology of organizations
  • Standards
  • Stigma
  • Temporary employment
  • Unemployment
  • Wages
  • Work
  • Workers
  • Working population. Employment. Women's work
  • Working women
ispartof: Social forces, 2012-03-01, Vol.90 (3), p.735-768
description: Previous research fails to address whether contingent employment benefits individuals' careers more than the alternative they often face: being without a job. Using work history data from Japan, this study shows that accepting a contingent job delays individuals' transition to standard employment more than remaining jobless. Moreover, having a contingent job, rather than having no job, leads Japanese men to have lower occupational status after they transition back to standard employment. I argue that in a highly segmented labor market like Japan's, the strict separation of labor pools for standard and contingent jobs makes being labeled as a contingent worker particularly detrimental. Meanwhile, the legacy of Japans welfare corporatism alleviates the stigma of unemployment, making individuals better off jobless than having a contingent job. This research thus demonstrates the importance of labor-market contexts in shaping the scarring effects of contingent work arrangements.
language: eng
source: Alma/SFX Local Collection
identifier: ISSN: 0037-7732
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0037-7732
  • 1534-7605
url: Link


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descriptionPrevious research fails to address whether contingent employment benefits individuals' careers more than the alternative they often face: being without a job. Using work history data from Japan, this study shows that accepting a contingent job delays individuals' transition to standard employment more than remaining jobless. Moreover, having a contingent job, rather than having no job, leads Japanese men to have lower occupational status after they transition back to standard employment. I argue that in a highly segmented labor market like Japan's, the strict separation of labor pools for standard and contingent jobs makes being labeled as a contingent worker particularly detrimental. Meanwhile, the legacy of Japans welfare corporatism alleviates the stigma of unemployment, making individuals better off jobless than having a contingent job. This research thus demonstrates the importance of labor-market contexts in shaping the scarring effects of contingent work arrangements.
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subjectArticle ; CAREERS ; Contract labor ; Educational standards ; Employment ; Japan ; Labor Market ; Labor markets ; Labour market ; Males ; Men ; Modeling ; Part-time employment ; Research ; Scope of employment ; Seasonal labor ; Self employment ; Sociology ; Sociology of work ; Sociology of work and sociology of organizations ; Standards ; Stigma ; Temporary employment ; Unemployment ; Wages ; Work ; Workers ; Working population. Employment. Women's work ; Working women
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abstractPrevious research fails to address whether contingent employment benefits individuals' careers more than the alternative they often face: being without a job. Using work history data from Japan, this study shows that accepting a contingent job delays individuals' transition to standard employment more than remaining jobless. Moreover, having a contingent job, rather than having no job, leads Japanese men to have lower occupational status after they transition back to standard employment. I argue that in a highly segmented labor market like Japan's, the strict separation of labor pools for standard and contingent jobs makes being labeled as a contingent worker particularly detrimental. Meanwhile, the legacy of Japans welfare corporatism alleviates the stigma of unemployment, making individuals better off jobless than having a contingent job. This research thus demonstrates the importance of labor-market contexts in shaping the scarring effects of contingent work arrangements.
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