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Weight Bias and Weight Loss Treatment Outcomes in Treatment-Seeking Adults

Background Few studies have explored the relationship between weight bias and weight loss treatment outcomes. Purpose This investigation examined the relationship between implicit and explicit weight bias and (a) program attrition, (b) weight loss, (c) self-monitoring adherence, (d) daily exercise l... Full description

Journal Title: Annals of behavioral medicine 2009, Vol.37 (3), p.350-355
Main Author: Carels, Robert A
Other Authors: Young, Kathleen M , Wott, Carissa B , Harper, Jessica , Gumble, Amanda , Oehlof, Marissa Wagner , Clayton, Anna Marie
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: New York: Springer-Verlag
ID: ISSN: 0883-6612
Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19548044
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recordid: cdi_pubmedcentral_primary_oai_pubmedcentral_nih_gov_3538814
title: Weight Bias and Weight Loss Treatment Outcomes in Treatment-Seeking Adults
format: Article
creator:
  • Carels, Robert A
  • Young, Kathleen M
  • Wott, Carissa B
  • Harper, Jessica
  • Gumble, Amanda
  • Oehlof, Marissa Wagner
  • Clayton, Anna Marie
subjects:
  • Adult
  • Article
  • Behavior Therapy - methods
  • Caloric intake
  • Diet
  • Energy Intake
  • Energy Metabolism
  • Exercise
  • Family Medicine
  • Female
  • general
  • General Practice
  • Health Psychology
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Medicine
  • Medicine & Public Health
  • Nutrition
  • Obesity
  • Obesity - psychology
  • Obesity - therapy
  • Overweight - psychology
  • Overweight - therapy
  • Patient Compliance - psychology
  • Patient Dropouts - psychology
  • Prejudice
  • Rapid Communication
  • Self-monitoring
  • Stigma
  • Treatment Outcome
  • Weight control
  • Weight Loss
ispartof: Annals of behavioral medicine, 2009, Vol.37 (3), p.350-355
description: Background Few studies have explored the relationship between weight bias and weight loss treatment outcomes. Purpose This investigation examined the relationship between implicit and explicit weight bias and (a) program attrition, (b) weight loss, (c) self-monitoring adherence, (d) daily exercise levels and overall caloric expenditure, (e) daily caloric intake, and (f) daily caloric deficit among overweight/obese treatment-seeking adults. Methods Forty-six overweight/obese adults (body mass index ≥ 27 kg/m 2 ) participating in an 18-week, stepped-care, behavioral weight loss program completed implicit and explicit measures of weight bias. Participants were instructed to self-monitor and electronically report daily energy intake, exercise, and energy expenditure. Results Greater weight bias was associated with inconsistent self-monitoring, greater caloric intake, lower energy expenditure and exercise, creation of a smaller caloric deficit, higher program attrition, as well as less weight loss during the self-help phase of the stepped-care treatment. Conclusions Weight bias may interfere with overweight/obese treatment-seeking adults' ability to achieve optimal health.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0883-6612
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0883-6612
  • 1532-4796
url: Link


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creatorCarels, Robert A ; Young, Kathleen M ; Wott, Carissa B ; Harper, Jessica ; Gumble, Amanda ; Oehlof, Marissa Wagner ; Clayton, Anna Marie
creatorcontribCarels, Robert A ; Young, Kathleen M ; Wott, Carissa B ; Harper, Jessica ; Gumble, Amanda ; Oehlof, Marissa Wagner ; Clayton, Anna Marie
descriptionBackground Few studies have explored the relationship between weight bias and weight loss treatment outcomes. Purpose This investigation examined the relationship between implicit and explicit weight bias and (a) program attrition, (b) weight loss, (c) self-monitoring adherence, (d) daily exercise levels and overall caloric expenditure, (e) daily caloric intake, and (f) daily caloric deficit among overweight/obese treatment-seeking adults. Methods Forty-six overweight/obese adults (body mass index ≥ 27 kg/m 2 ) participating in an 18-week, stepped-care, behavioral weight loss program completed implicit and explicit measures of weight bias. Participants were instructed to self-monitor and electronically report daily energy intake, exercise, and energy expenditure. Results Greater weight bias was associated with inconsistent self-monitoring, greater caloric intake, lower energy expenditure and exercise, creation of a smaller caloric deficit, higher program attrition, as well as less weight loss during the self-help phase of the stepped-care treatment. Conclusions Weight bias may interfere with overweight/obese treatment-seeking adults' ability to achieve optimal health.
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subjectAdult ; Article ; Behavior Therapy - methods ; Caloric intake ; Diet ; Energy Intake ; Energy Metabolism ; Exercise ; Family Medicine ; Female ; general ; General Practice ; Health Psychology ; Humans ; Male ; Medicine ; Medicine & Public Health ; Nutrition ; Obesity ; Obesity - psychology ; Obesity - therapy ; Overweight - psychology ; Overweight - therapy ; Patient Compliance - psychology ; Patient Dropouts - psychology ; Prejudice ; Rapid Communication ; Self-monitoring ; Stigma ; Treatment Outcome ; Weight control ; Weight Loss
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descriptionBackground Few studies have explored the relationship between weight bias and weight loss treatment outcomes. Purpose This investigation examined the relationship between implicit and explicit weight bias and (a) program attrition, (b) weight loss, (c) self-monitoring adherence, (d) daily exercise levels and overall caloric expenditure, (e) daily caloric intake, and (f) daily caloric deficit among overweight/obese treatment-seeking adults. Methods Forty-six overweight/obese adults (body mass index ≥ 27 kg/m 2 ) participating in an 18-week, stepped-care, behavioral weight loss program completed implicit and explicit measures of weight bias. Participants were instructed to self-monitor and electronically report daily energy intake, exercise, and energy expenditure. Results Greater weight bias was associated with inconsistent self-monitoring, greater caloric intake, lower energy expenditure and exercise, creation of a smaller caloric deficit, higher program attrition, as well as less weight loss during the self-help phase of the stepped-care treatment. Conclusions Weight bias may interfere with overweight/obese treatment-seeking adults' ability to achieve optimal health.
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abstractBackground Few studies have explored the relationship between weight bias and weight loss treatment outcomes. Purpose This investigation examined the relationship between implicit and explicit weight bias and (a) program attrition, (b) weight loss, (c) self-monitoring adherence, (d) daily exercise levels and overall caloric expenditure, (e) daily caloric intake, and (f) daily caloric deficit among overweight/obese treatment-seeking adults. Methods Forty-six overweight/obese adults (body mass index ≥ 27 kg/m 2 ) participating in an 18-week, stepped-care, behavioral weight loss program completed implicit and explicit measures of weight bias. Participants were instructed to self-monitor and electronically report daily energy intake, exercise, and energy expenditure. Results Greater weight bias was associated with inconsistent self-monitoring, greater caloric intake, lower energy expenditure and exercise, creation of a smaller caloric deficit, higher program attrition, as well as less weight loss during the self-help phase of the stepped-care treatment. Conclusions Weight bias may interfere with overweight/obese treatment-seeking adults' ability to achieve optimal health.
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